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View TimInIndiana's profile

Shop on a Hypothetical Budget

by TimInIndiana
posted 01-10-2018 01:44 AM


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53 replies

53 replies so far

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

612 posts in 738 days


#1 posted 01-10-2018 02:20 AM

Well thats a loaded question in my opinion.
might first decide type of project you will try to accomplish, list them, and then review tools that MAY be needed, as there are so many specialty tools available, one might find one tool can and will do many aspects of a project.

its not about the money, to buy as needed, its about the skill to use what you have and only buy that which is needed to increase your skill

jmo
and good luck with shop, if you find yourself with a few extra dugas, i’m sure a few folks here will take’m off yer hands.
Rj in az

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

30458 posts in 2874 days


#2 posted 01-10-2018 02:23 AM

Welcome to Lumberjocks

First decide what you want to make, then decide how you will get there.

-- Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View TimInIndiana's profile

TimInIndiana

149 posts in 676 days


#3 posted 01-10-2018 02:27 AM

Thanks for the feedback. I’d like to work up to building furniture; on my short list is a nice chest of drawers.

But getting started, I’m interested in more attainable goals to pick up some skills. Cutting boards, coasters, boxes, you name it.

My wife really likes live edge slab stuff, so I expect something along those lines in near future.

One goal I have is to use rough cut lumber and dimension it myself for use in my projects.

I see myself as being more of a power tool type, but have great respect for hand tools and would enjoy to acquire and learn to properly use at least the basic ones!

Tomorrow I start an 8-week (meeting once a week) woodworking course that should give me a better feel for the tools and what type of work I’d like to get into.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

6065 posts in 2256 days


#4 posted 01-10-2018 02:31 AM

I would buy used: 1) cabinet saw $1000. 2) dust collector $300. 3) bench top planer $250. 4) 14” bandsaw $350. 5) 6” jointer $150. 6) 6” belt x 12” disc sander $450.

All of these are close to what I can easily find in my area given enough time. This also doesn’t include any hand held power tools like a drill, router or sanders + consumables.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8343 posts in 3911 days


#5 posted 01-10-2018 02:43 AM

It really depends on what you want to do. For furniture and general woodworking, I would start with a good full size TS, router, portable planer, 14” BS, DP, bench, palm sander, jack plane, block plane, and DC. Look to used where feasible, and add a jointer if you can.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View playingwithmywood's profile

playingwithmywood

444 posts in 2133 days


#6 posted 01-10-2018 02:55 AM

14” bandsaw used maybe 500 to 700 used table saw used $500
a router DEWALT DW618PK $213
narex chisels 4 set $50
planer DeWALT DW735 Heavy-Duty 13’’ 600
floor drill press ridgid 429 home depot or a used drill press to save money
and then jointer I would bite the bullet for a 8” 750-1000 but if you buy a 6” buy it cheap knowing that you will probally grow out of it so you can sell and get your money back

simple if you look around and buy used you can get deal but it is not the big tools that really cost it is the little stuff you end up buying and then the cost of good wood to turn into saw dust later

View playingwithmywood's profile

playingwithmywood

444 posts in 2133 days


#7 posted 01-10-2018 02:59 AM


14” bandsaw used maybe 500 to 700 used table saw used $500
a router DEWALT DW618PK $213
narex chisels 4 set $50
planer DeWALT DW735 Heavy-Duty 13 600
floor drill press ridgid 429 home depot or a used drill press to save money
and then jointer I would bite the bullet for a 8” 750-1000 but if you buy a 6” buy it cheap knowing that you will probally grow out of it so you can sell and get your money back

simple if you look around and buy used you can get deal but it is not the big tools that really cost it is the little stuff you end up buying and then the cost of good wood to turn into saw dust later

and speaking dust I would have bought a good cyclone dust collector to start with maybe Grizzly G0703 $1000 I did the harbor freight thing and then upgrade and upgraded it should have just started bigger and saved time and money

- playingwithmywood

oops please delete

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1343 posts in 1031 days


#8 posted 01-10-2018 03:12 AM


Tomorrow I start an 8-week (meeting once a week) woodworking course that should give me a better feel for the tools and what type of work I d like to get into.

- TimInIndiana


Wait until after your class. You will have a much better idea of what you need then. Good tools can last a lifetime, don’t rush.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

1080 posts in 2820 days


#9 posted 01-10-2018 03:33 AM

Wood Magazine ran a good series that you may be interested in. Idea Shop 6 takes you from no tools to a decently equipped shop. The setup may not be ideal for everyone, but it will probably help you make your decisions. Here is a link:

https://www.woodmagazine.com/workshop/idea-shop-6

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

495 posts in 3106 days


#10 posted 01-10-2018 04:35 AM

My budget IS hypothetical..

View Bill Berklich's profile

Bill Berklich

935 posts in 924 days


#11 posted 01-10-2018 11:49 AM



My budget IS hypothetical..

- jerkylips

ROFL… It’s only hypothetical because you have not started buying. Once the “Tool Bug” bites it’s hard to stop. And Playingwithmywood is right about two things. All the little things add up and go big in the dust collection up front. I didn’t either and have spent more in “upgrades” than if I just went out an bought a decent cyclone out of the gate. Go as big as you can then go $500 bigger. It will still be cheaper than the buying changing, fixing, upgrading, buying routine.

-- Bill - Rochester MI

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1183 days


#12 posted 01-10-2018 11:51 AM

If I had a $10,000 budget, I would erect a $5000 building and equip it exactly as it is now … completely unplugged with roughly $250 of essential hand tools, $150 of supplies … and spend the remaining $4600 on lumber!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5799 posts in 3029 days


#13 posted 01-10-2018 12:08 PM

I like your plan just fine…I would start with a table saw and maybe a select group of hand tools, and go from there. One point that yeti made, it’s easy to overlook dust collection. After all, the machine does nothing directly to the wood, and it does cost some money. Yet I see it as extremely important; worthy of being very high on the “next to buy” list. So as you consider your subsequent purchases, keep that in mind.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

489 posts in 918 days


#14 posted 01-10-2018 12:22 PM

-Table saw
-Router with plunge and fixed base
-Clamps, lots and lots of clamps. You’ll need more than you think.
-Bench top disc/belt sander
-Drill press
-Misc straight edge/squaring tools
-5” random orbital sander
-Dust collection with cyclone, could be as simple as a shop vac to start. ; a remote on/off is SUPER handy to have, but you don’t need one of these fancy “remote vacuum starters”. Go to Lowe’s and pickup one in the electrical or seasonal isle for half the price.
-Flush cut Japanese saw.

Craigslist and patience is your friend, patience the best one. The deals will come by you if you can be patient and persistent. Retail/full price is for suckers.

View Firewood's profile

Firewood

981 posts in 2170 days


#15 posted 01-10-2018 01:17 PM

TimInIndiana, welcome to LJ. I’m with supercubber on reviewing the IdeaShop 6 article in Wood Magazine. Not only does it show how to build a shop on a budget over time, it also increases your skills through the various projects needed to build out the shop.

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

View TimInIndiana's profile

TimInIndiana

149 posts in 676 days


#16 posted 01-10-2018 01:20 PM

Thanks for the welcome!

I like that article from Wood Magazine and have bookmarked it.

View Holt's profile

Holt

280 posts in 3165 days


#17 posted 01-10-2018 02:10 PM

Buy the best deal you can find on a quality used cabinet saw, Powertmatic, Unisaw, I’m sure there are other good choices. Find a cheap Shopsmith with tons of accessories (band saw, jointer, any of the sanders). Get a good lunchbox planer. On the planer, I’d go new. Most of those (maybe all) have universal motors and I’m not sure about the longevity. Plus, folks try to do all kinds of crazy things with them. The Shopsmith will fill in the gaps as time goes by, you can start replacing its functions with stand alone tools. Once you have stand a stand alone band saw, jointer, and drill press, you can use the Shopsmith as the best sanding station in the world, platform for shop made tools (drum sander!), and you have a horizontal boring machine. Some folks would use the Shopsmith as a table saw, but I’ve never been fond of that function (although it makes a good dado blade station).

-- ...Specialization is for insects.

View Robert's profile

Robert

3555 posts in 2016 days


#18 posted 01-10-2018 02:17 PM

$2500 will get you somewhere, but not very far if you plan on buying quality tools. You could easily spend it all on just a tablesaw.

$5K is a more reasonable budget. Starting out, I’d probably be looking at Grizzly. Best bang for the buck IMO. With the exception of a miter saw, I would stay away from consumer machines you see in the big box stores.

I think the minimum to set up a shop would be:

1. Machines:

2HP Hybrid TS,
14” BS,
8” jointer,
12” – 15”planer (not a lunchbox!!).

2. Hand helds:

Cordeless drills (at least 2), router (at least 2), random orbital sander, air nailers (pin and 15ga brad), impact drivers are nice, circ saw, jig saw to name a few.

3. Hand tools:

Chisels, hammers, saws, measuring, marking, etc.

Keep in mind you also have shop projects like cabinets, workbenches, outfeed tables, etc. Quality ply and hardware are not cheap.

Good luck take it one step at a time. Get the tablesaw first.

If I had a $10,000 budget, I would erect a $5000 building and equip it exactly as it is now … completely unplugged with roughly $250 of essential hand tools, $150 of supplies … and spend the remaining $4600 on lumber!
Not sure how much building you can get for $5K, but I like it!!!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

495 posts in 3106 days


#19 posted 01-10-2018 03:30 PM


My budget IS hypothetical..

- jerkylips

ROFL… It s only hypothetical because you have not started buying. Once the “Tool Bug” bites it s hard to stop. And Playingwithmywood is right about two things. All the little things add up and go big in the dust collection up front. I didn t either and have spent more in “upgrades” than if I just went out an bought a decent cyclone out of the gate. Go as big as you can then go $500 bigger. It will still be cheaper than the buying changing, fixing, upgrading, buying routine.

- Bluenote38

oh, I have it. I’m in the doghouse with the misses right now because I bought a jointer & a bandsaw without her knowing…hid them in the back of the garage, but forgot to hide the receipt – she found it going through mail & gave me the, “can you explain this?” hahahah

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117745 posts in 4113 days


#20 posted 01-10-2018 03:45 PM

Hi Tim Welcome to Ljs
I’m a woodworking instructor,I find some of my students buy equipment and end up only doing one aspect of woodworking such as: turning on a lathe, scroll saw work or even carving. I would suggest you enroll in a woodworking class to see what you like in addition you will get a feel for what equipment you will use plus the big issue of learning about the safe use of all the tools.

View TimInIndiana's profile

TimInIndiana

149 posts in 676 days


#21 posted 01-10-2018 03:55 PM



Hi Tim Welcome to Ljs
I m a woodworking instructor,I find some of my students buy equipment and end up only doing one aspect of woodworking such as: turning on a lathe, scroll saw work or even carving. I would suggest you enroll in a woodworking class to see what you like in addition you will get a feel for what equipment you will use plus the big issue of learning about the safe use of all the tools.

- a1Jim

This is excellent advice. I’m trawling Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace to see if I can improve my skills in identifying good deals, but I’m not planning any substantial equipment purchases until I finish a course or two. My first course starts tonight!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117745 posts in 4113 days


#22 posted 01-10-2018 04:10 PM

I hope you enjoy your class Tim, it seems you were several steps ahead of me already. :)

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

3676 posts in 2393 days


#23 posted 01-10-2018 04:20 PM

Go to auctionzip.com and look at some auctions. We have very good tool auctions here in Indiana. I see you are in Jeff as am I so we have very good auctions and woodcraft has a couple free demo classes a month check them out also.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12924 posts in 2916 days


#24 posted 01-10-2018 07:27 PM

High quality cabinet saw
Plunge router
Cordless drill & bits
Set of chisels #4 or #5 hand plane
Sharpening stones
High quality combination square, PEC, Starrett, don’t waste money on cheap ones.
Those things will let you make a lot of furniture.

Circular saw
Planer
Jointer
Scrapers
Open you up to working with rough lumber.

Band saw
Drill press
Router table
Expand your capabilities and make some things easier.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2022 days


#25 posted 01-10-2018 07:34 PM

A note on Craigslist. I picked up what I think is the best steals on there. 1 weeks apart. The key? I watched it for 2 years straight once or twice a day. I tried to be the first to call and I made sure to be as friendly and convenient as possible. I had enough cash for asking If the price couldn’t be talked down. And I had cash or a readily accessible cash flow the wife didn’t know about :)

You have to jump when the time comes.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View PPK's profile

PPK

1544 posts in 1345 days


#26 posted 01-10-2018 07:42 PM



If I had a $10,000 budget, I would erect a $5000 building and equip it exactly as it is now … completely unplugged with roughly $250 of essential hand tools, $150 of supplies … and spend the remaining $4600 on lumber!

- Ron Aylor

We need more guys like you, Ron… we really do. You’re not afraid of work. You make truly beautiful pieces… :-)

-- Pete

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PPK

1544 posts in 1345 days


#27 posted 01-10-2018 07:51 PM

I started out with about a $2500 shop…

$1000 Delta X5 tablesaw
$200 10” Dewalt chop saw
$500 Delta X5 6” jointer
$150 Porter Cable router, and a $50 set of router bits
$200 for Dewalt random orbital sander and Porter Cable belt sander
$90 Bosch Jig saw
$125 Makita circular saw, along with a nice straight edge I used for cutting long sheets.

I think that leaves about $200 for misc. hand tools and consumables. I made a lot of fun projects in my dad’s shop with these tools. Mainly cabinet and furniture type stuff. My very first “real” project was a dresser. I built it twice, because in my excitement to get the most out of a sheet of plywood, I oriented the grain horizontal instead of vertical. It looked awful :-)

I now have a shop that’s worth about $25K, and can do anything I want, pretty much. But it took awhile to get there!

-- Pete

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

888 posts in 3035 days


#28 posted 01-11-2018 10:57 AM

I would say like Ron Aylor + going to a hand woodworking course.
But if you wife expect a new kitchen for the day before yeasterday, take the machining route.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1183 days


#29 posted 01-11-2018 11:23 AM



I would say like Ron Aylor + going to a hand woodworking course.
But if you wife expect a new kitchen for the day before yeasterday, take the machining route.

- Sylvain

OR … find a more patient bride … LOL!

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1183 days


#30 posted 01-11-2018 11:24 AM


If I had a $10,000 budget, I would erect a $5000 building and equip it exactly as it is now … completely unplugged with roughly $250 of essential hand tools, $150 of supplies … and spend the remaining $4600 on lumber!

- Ron Aylor

We need more guys like you, Ron… we really do. You re not afraid of work. You make truly beautiful pieces… :-)

- PPK

Thank you, Pete. I really appreciate that!

View fuigb's profile

fuigb

564 posts in 3493 days


#31 posted 01-11-2018 11:58 AM

OP is taking a class: I say buy nothing at all until inspiration strikes for a specific skill or project then begin looking for used equipment to satisfy that need/urge. Anyone in this game knows that any fixed amount won’t be enough no matter the amount, so buy what you need and ease in.

One other thought: do you ever wonder about the barely-used equipment that shows up at estate sales and Craig’s list? The nightmare scenarios are that some craftsman bought his X and then promptly died of excitement or maybe a pro had a moment of carelessness and cut off both of his hands on the inaugural run. More likely, i feel, this equipment was picked up on impulse by someone inexperienced who had more money than real insight into woodworkng as a lifestyle. I’m not picking specifically on the OP, but questions such as the one asked here usually bring to mind those unused gems that we all see and ask ourselves ” why did the seller spend so much for a table saw/chisel set/hand saw/ plane/whatever and then not use the damn thing?” Lack of impulse control, of course. Good on the OP fortaking a class and so having the opportunity to determine his true level of interest before just jumping in with a checkbook.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

975 posts in 1755 days


#32 posted 01-11-2018 06:28 PM


My wife really likes live edge slab stuff, so I expect something along those lines in near future.

- TimInIndiana

youre wife liking the woodworking projects you can do- THAT is your ace in the hole for budget. once you start, you will find projects requiring new techniques,requiring new tools, requiring the OK from headquarters.
which if headquarters is liking the projects, approval for budget increase is easier.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1453 posts in 3296 days


#33 posted 01-12-2018 04:19 PM

I’m a long time woodworker and my firm opinion is that same as bigblockyeti – buy USED! Yes, it takes patience and some time, but you double your budget buying capability and end up with very nice light industrial machines. The truth is good older industrial machines are built like tanks and though they may be somewhat battle scarred, down beneath they are usually solid as a rock. I have almost all 1940s through 1960s used machines all over my shop. I have never had a problem of the machine being worn out or the bearings need replacing. Just a good clean up and some de-rusting here and there which is an enjoyable project in itself. Re-paint with a good oil-base enamel and these machines can appear like they just came out of the factory – and work that way. Contact the industrial suppliers that sell these machines new. They often take older machines in trade. Watch auctions, government auctions, county and state auctions (state schools sell their older machines), eBay, Craigs List, etc.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1183 days


#34 posted 01-12-2018 04:39 PM


... I have almost all 1940s through 1960s used machines all over my shop …

- Planeman40

Rufus, you need to post some photos of your shop … you’ve got some really nice equipment! A little to electrical for my taste, but nice equipment nonetheless!

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1453 posts in 3296 days


#35 posted 01-12-2018 05:13 PM

Thanks Ron, I should do that. However, compared to you, EVERYBODY on this forum has a nicer shop than you do! ; )

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117745 posts in 4113 days


#36 posted 01-12-2018 05:22 PM

I agree with Rob in that older equipment can be built like tanks and bulletproof,but there are some provisos, such as their size and weight they can take lots of room that more current machines don’t and that some machines have to be modified to work with today’s standards such as replacing babbitted bearings, riving knives etc. This means you need the know how space and time to restore such beautiful machines or the funds to pay someone else to do the job. If you do your time and efforts will be rewarded with a beautiful work of art and amazing
functionality, not to mention a great investment

View AlmostRetired's profile

AlmostRetired

220 posts in 1250 days


#37 posted 01-12-2018 05:23 PM

Welcome! I agree with bigblockyeti as the used purchases are probably a good thing to get you started…after your class is over.

View TimInIndiana's profile

TimInIndiana

149 posts in 676 days


#38 posted 01-12-2018 05:25 PM

Just to make sure I understand what everyone is telling me, I should start my tool collection with this, right?

https://louisville.craigslist.org/tls/d/super-duty-do-all-saw-auto/6454448601.html

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16234 posts in 3154 days


#39 posted 01-12-2018 05:35 PM



Just to make sure I understand what everyone is telling me, I should start my tool collection with this, right?

https://louisville.craigslist.org/tls/d/super-duty-do-all-saw-auto/6454448601.html

- TimInIndiana

Hypothetically, yes.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1453 posts in 3296 days


#40 posted 01-12-2018 05:37 PM

Babbit bearings can be found in some really old machines from the early 1900’s. However from the World War 2 era on almost all light industrial machines have ball bearings. And in case a ball bearing should be bad, they are usually standard items still available from bearing and drive houses. A quick Internet search should find you whatever is needed. What often cannot be replaced are broken castings. These are usually cast iron. Sometimes these cast iron castings can be repaired by brazing (using brass rod and a oxy-acetelyne torch). Most welding shops should be able to do this. Not particularly expensive. I have this capability in my shop and have done it myself.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1461 posts in 1759 days


#41 posted 01-12-2018 05:46 PM

I don’t think I saw it but if if you’re doing live edge furniture, I think a track saw really comes in handy.

If you need to split a slab to flatten and then glue up again, you will need it. Also, large slabs are difficult to get a glue joint on a jointer of you’re a single person working in the shop.

I just got mine for quick cuts here and there but I have a sliding table saw to do everything I’m talking about. Since you’re just starting, I don’t know if you’d have the room for a slider so that’s why I’m thinking a track saw would really be a critical tool. If you’re going to use a lot of sheet goods, it will also come in handy.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117745 posts in 4113 days


#42 posted 01-12-2018 10:14 PM

if your not buy new and if you want to drive a little bit jump on this saw,It will be gone quickly.

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/255913

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4183 days


#43 posted 01-12-2018 10:31 PM

If I had $10k in a 2 car garage and intended
to make slab furniture:

18” bandsaw. Probably Rikon as it looks like a
decent value from what I’ve read $1600

12” Jointer/planer combo. Grizzly maybe.
Spiral cutterhead probably. $3k.

Festool TS75 with a couple of rails and a TSO
square. $1500

Any contractor saw. For cutting joints, squaring
smaller parts, etc. $600

Plunge router/fixed base combo. Any brand $300.

Basic single bag dust collector. $250.

Tool triggered vacuum. $300-$600

That leaves some left over for hand tools, sanders,
hoses, saw horses, vise and bench, etc. One could
blow $1500 on a Domino XL but a plunge router
makes right angle mortises easily too.

A modest lathe for turning table legs might be useful
as would a miter saw and belt/disc sander. None
of those would need to be fancy or top-of-line
for me.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1872 posts in 2852 days


#44 posted 01-13-2018 06:04 AM

The more experienced I become, the more I stick to buying only what I need, when I need it. It saves a lot of time and money in the long run. Due to high-quality tastes, I tend to buy used since I can seldom afford the level of quality I like in tools. The $25,000 sliding table saws have the features I want but an old $500 Minimax s250 with $300 of accessories added on comes as close as I can get to that.

What I think many people forget to budget in is the cost of organization supplies and fixtures. About half my upgrade budget gets consumed with items like bins, shelves, casters and wood to make the shop clean and easy to work in. Even the best tools are useless if they are buried under junk.

So my approach now is to start with a woodworking project and determine what the minimum tools are to build it within an acceptable time-frame. Start there and and add whatever is needed to improve quality or save time.

I realize that I didn’t provide a specific list but that’s not possible with my method. It’s too project-dependent.

My approach wouldn’t change if the budget changes other than I might spend a little more for better tools that require less time to prepare for use.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

612 posts in 738 days


#45 posted 01-13-2018 02:20 PM

Yep, i’d work on the class, figure out a direction and purchase as skill set and need arises.
imo, most of the gents here have good intentions, but only you can decide a direction and what you need.
If you buy a gaggle of power tools, then opt to go the hand tool skill set, well, you kinda know where that went.
Most of us have already picked a direction, and have our lot cast, we know what we want, and an approximate direction to go in, that is your issue now, hummmm, what, where and how

When i put together the cabinet shop years ago, i bough deep, and a lot i had no regular need for, so the budget was off the chart, and abused.

even now i wished i had a few other things, the main one being space. lol

good luck, what an adventure you are embarking on, i stepped onto the gang plank in the early 70s and am still enjoying the walk.
rj in az

View jonal's profile

jonal

7 posts in 825 days


#46 posted 01-13-2018 03:09 PM

Hi Tim! I see you’re in Jeffersonville….me too!! Where did you find a local 8 week training course?

View TimInIndiana's profile

TimInIndiana

149 posts in 676 days


#47 posted 01-13-2018 03:39 PM

I’m taking the class at Ted Harlan’s school in Louisville: http://www.tedharlan.com/

Another jock did a review on it several years ago: http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/2345

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 1183 days


#48 posted 01-13-2018 08:48 PM


Thanks Ron, I should do that. However, compared to you, EVERYBODY on this forum has a nicer shop than you do! ; )

- Planeman40

That’s true. It’s a wonder I can build anything at all. LOL!

View msinc's profile

msinc

567 posts in 1039 days


#49 posted 01-13-2018 09:10 PM


Hi Tim Welcome to Ljs
I m a woodworking instructor,I find some of my students buy equipment and end up only doing one aspect of woodworking such as: turning on a lathe, scroll saw work or even carving. I would suggest you enroll in a woodworking class to see what you like in addition you will get a feel for what equipment you will use plus the big issue of learning about the safe use of all the tools.

- a1Jim

This!!!! I would also suggest that you don’t try to take a set amount of money and spend it all on what you either think you need or what someone has told you. I would get one or two machines that you know you can make some little items on that will sell easily and take the money you make when you have enough and buy decent stuff. That way you are not ending up replacing every machine in the shop at the end of the day. Example, a wood lathe is a blast of fun and can be used to quickly make all kinds of items that don’t cost you a lot and usually sell pretty easily.
As to the dust collector, this is just my opinion, forget it for now…a $2 dust mask will protect you….a dust collector while a good idea for later will yield zero profits. Best of luck.

Edit: this may sound a little hard, but forget about the wife and her live edge stuff…she is not going to buy anything from you, so why start out at the most critical time working for free when you need to be making some money to buy good stuff that you will need? I mean, if you are really serious about getting into some real wood working explain to her the plan. If she don’t get it then you might have to do something “different”. I like Mexican girls, they are the best!!!!!

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TimInIndiana

149 posts in 676 days


#50 posted 01-22-2018 12:06 PM

I appreciate all the replies on this thread. I’ve been trawling Craigslist, Facebook Market, OfferUp, etc. over the past couple of weeks and purchased my first table saw yesterday! It’s a Craftsman 113.298762. The top seems to be in great shape with very little cleanup needed. Motor runs fine, belt is in good shape. It still has the stock fence, which isn’t so great. I checked the arbor and lift/tilt mechanisms and they seemed to be in good working order. I think I managed a to find a decent saw for $40! May need to some help getting it tuned up just right…

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