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All Replies on Running air lines for a new Husky 60 gallon compressor

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View SweetTea's profile

Running air lines for a new Husky 60 gallon compressor

by SweetTea
posted 10-26-2017 11:14 AM


45 replies so far

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

1076 posts in 2098 days


#1 posted 10-26-2017 11:26 AM

can ya get us some pics of where the lines are going?

edit:
no matter what piping is used, its a good idea to have a flex line similar to this
https://www.amazon.com/Flexible-Connector-compressor-stainless-braided/dp/B004S4FEE6

off of the compressor and to the line.

are you planning on mounting the compressor to the floor? with some rubber pads between the compressor and floor, my compressor was a lot quieter running.

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

478 posts in 1539 days


#2 posted 10-26-2017 01:22 PM

V


can ya get us some pics of where the lines are going?

edit:
no matter what piping is used, its a good idea to have a flex line similar to this
https://www.amazon.com/Flexible-Connector-compressor-stainless-braided/dp/B004S4FEE6

off of the compressor and to the line.

are you planning on mounting the compressor to the floor? with some rubber pads between the compressor and floor, my compressor was a lot quieter running.

- tomsteve

I plan to leave the compressor on the pallet it came on. See post below for pics.

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

478 posts in 1539 days


#3 posted 10-26-2017 01:23 PM

Pics:

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

478 posts in 1539 days


#4 posted 10-26-2017 01:25 PM

See that door in the back ground inside the hallway? The line will run through the top left corner of that door, and onto the left side of the wall on room on the other side of that door.

View Robert's profile

Robert

4035 posts in 2359 days


#5 posted 10-26-2017 03:36 PM

Here is a quote from a thread on Sawmillcreek:

I sent an email to a company that supplies PEX (pexconnection.com) here is what he said when I asked about using PEX for compressed air in a hobby woodworking shop

” Air is routinely used for pressure testing PEX plumbing systems, and we use it here to distribute the air for our air compressor, so I would say that it should not be a problem for you to do that.”

Then I asked about exposure to fluorescent lights in my shop. And his reply was:
“For best results, you will most likely need to cover it. PEX should not be exposed to direct UV light for more than 30 days. I will say, however, that the PEX we are using (for water and air) is exposed to direct fluorescent light and indirect sunlight and is performing well. Still, the recommendation is that it not be exposed to UV light.”

I used PEX for the first time to move a toilet supply in our basement. It is so much nicer to work with than copper.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6102 posts in 3188 days


#6 posted 10-26-2017 11:54 PM

http://www.hoseandfittingsetc.com/our-blog/bid/94802/what-type-of-pipe-should-i-use-for-my-air-compressor

I don’t see pex on this list. Do it right with recommend materials. I’m often times disappointed when I do thing cheap and easy.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6102 posts in 3188 days


#7 posted 10-27-2017 12:00 AM



can ya get us some pics of where the lines are going?

edit:
no matter what piping is used, its a good idea to have a flex line similar to this
https://www.amazon.com/Flexible-Connector-compressor-stainless-braided/dp/B004S4FEE6

off of the compressor and to the line.

are you planning on mounting the compressor to the floor? with some rubber pads between the compressor and floor, my compressor was a lot quieter running.

- tomsteve


Good advice

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

308 posts in 1654 days


#8 posted 10-27-2017 12:53 AM

I used Pex in my shop,never again. I installed it properly but it leaks down. Leaks are very small and silent but there are many.
Use black pipe,or soldered copper.

View msinc's profile

msinc

567 posts in 1382 days


#9 posted 10-27-2017 01:34 AM

Aside from metal pipe, such as black iron or galvanized, the only proper air line I am aware of that is a plastic type is ABS. Many shops have their airlines plumbed with PVC and have probably never had a problem…yet….but PVC is dangerous because if it breaks it shatters like glass into big sharp shards that can and will inflict severe wounds or cuts. You definitely do not want to be in the same room when a PVC airline decides to fail.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13503 posts in 3259 days


#10 posted 10-27-2017 01:34 AM

Why not use air hose? It’s fairly inexpensive and designed to hold air.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View pontic's profile

pontic

801 posts in 1487 days


#11 posted 10-27-2017 02:43 AM



I used Pex in my shop,never again. I installed it properly but it leaks down. Leaks are very small and silent but there are many.
Use black pipe,or soldered copper.

- Richard Lee


I too experienced this. I went back to soldered copper for 125psi. I recommend black pipe for higher pressures.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6102 posts in 3188 days


#12 posted 10-27-2017 03:23 AM

Each to their own, I went with type M copper and sliver solder. Type M is the thicker walled and is approved for air. Home Depot has it. Silver solder is recommend for fire reason so I read. Higher melting point in case of a shop fire.

The potential problem with just running standard hose is if you don’t keep it straight every little dip will be a possible water trap. Read up on running you lines to take care of moisture in the system. This is all on line for the reading;

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1383 posts in 1374 days


#13 posted 10-27-2017 03:31 AM

For safety reasons you should never use plastic pipe for compressed air systems. Use only copper or black iron. if it is a temporary system you could just run a big air hose as previously mentioned (3/8” or 1/2”).

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View TheTurtleCarpenter's profile

TheTurtleCarpenter

1053 posts in 1945 days


#14 posted 10-27-2017 05:22 AM



For safety reasons you should never use plastic pipe for compressed air systems. Use only copper or black iron. if it is a temporary system you could just run a big air hose as previously mentioned (3/8” or 1/2”).

- TungOil
</blockquot

True ! I am guilty as anybody but my insurance writer at my previous buisness informed me that a plastic or rubber line that was exposed to heat and failed, would fuel a fire and intenseify it.

-- "Tying shoelaces was way harder than learning to Whistle"

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1745 posts in 3688 days


#15 posted 10-27-2017 11:43 AM



Why not use air hose? It s fairly inexpensive and designed to hold air.

- Rick_M

Hahaha !.....I didn’t want to say anything

View pontic's profile

pontic

801 posts in 1487 days


#16 posted 10-27-2017 12:55 PM



Each to their own, I went with type M copper and sliver solder. Type M is the thicker walled and is approved for air. Home Depot has it. Silver solder is recommend for fire reason so I read. Higher melting point in case of a shop fire.

The potential problem with just running standard hose is if you don t keep it straight every little dip will be a possible water trap. Read up on running you lines to take care of moisture in the system. This is all on line for the reading;
When I said copper I meant type M and solder was silver. I agree with you 100% In my neck of the woods if you have a compressor that runs delivery lines higher than 126psi. you gotta use black pipe.
- AlaskaGuy


-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View richardchaos's profile

richardchaos

583 posts in 1258 days


#17 posted 10-27-2017 01:08 PM

Thats funny? ...Your Compressor looks a lot like a DeWalt Planner!


Pics:

- SweetTea

-- “In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.” ― George Orwell

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

1076 posts in 2098 days


#18 posted 10-27-2017 05:14 PM



Thats funny? ...Your Compressor looks a lot like a DeWalt Planner!

- SweetTea
- richardchaos

with the 20 gallon compressor attachment

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

1076 posts in 2098 days


#19 posted 10-27-2017 05:17 PM

one thing ive learned:
there were times i though some concept would be cheap and easy and it turned out to be difficult and more expensive than how its usually done.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13503 posts in 3259 days


#20 posted 10-27-2017 06:04 PM



The potential problem with just running standard hose is if you don t keep it straight every little dip will be a possible water trap. Read up on running you lines to take care of moisture in the system. This is all on line for the reading;

- AlaskaGuy

You’re not going to get puddles, it has compressed air running through it.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

609 posts in 2348 days


#21 posted 10-27-2017 08:12 PM



For safety reasons you should never use plastic pipe for compressed air systems. Use only copper or black iron. if it is a temporary system you could just run a big air hose as previously mentioned (3/8” or 1/2”).

- TungOil

Plastic is not always PVC.

There are hundreds of different kinds of plastic. Some are suitable for compressed air, and some are not. Pex will not shatter at all. I think it maintains some degree of flexibility even down to cryogenic temperatures, like if dipped in liquid nitrogen.

Another cheap tubing for compressed air is DOT-rated Nylon, it’s sold in large rolls and is used on freight trucks for air brake systems. It typically has a 300PSI working pressure and a 900PSI burst pressure and is available in a bunch of sizes.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1383 posts in 1374 days


#22 posted 10-27-2017 09:31 PM



Plastic is not always PVC.

There are hundreds of different kinds of plastic. Some are suitable for compressed air, and some are not.

- William Shelley

Yes, there are many different types of plastics, but the ones suitable for compressed air and the associated fittings can be expensive. The last time I ran CA piping in the plant the only permissible plastics were ABS, PE and HDPE. I elected to stay with black iron based on cost and feedback from our risk group, who checked with the insurance company (exactly the reason stated above).

This might be useful. From the Piping Handbook, 6th ed., pages C.156-C.157:

….compressed air contains stored energy and system failure can result in explosive reactions…..Do not use PVC or CPVC or any material subject to brittle failure for compressed air. Other thermoplastics which which are not subject to brittle failure may be used. Check with the manufacturer of the material to be sure it is recommended for compressed air service. Steel and copper pipe with malleable iron, cast-iron, or copper fittings are suitable materials for compressed air

Personally, I would use black iron or copper. It is inexpensive, easily obtainable from the local hardware store, and the rigidity will allow it to be installed with the proper slope and drip legs to control moisture- critical if you are feeding a spray application. But that’s just me. If you decide to use PEX or other plastic tubing, be sure to check with the manufacturer to see if it is suitable for CA use and install it somewhere that it is not likely to be damaged.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View jonah's profile

jonah

2129 posts in 4177 days


#23 posted 10-27-2017 11:14 PM

Pex is cross linked polyethylene. It isn’t subject to brittle failure and won’t explode into shrapnel like PVC if it fails.

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

478 posts in 1539 days


#24 posted 10-28-2017 09:05 AM

Ok so now I have a different question now that I got my air lines done. What exactly should I have inline between the compressor and the paint gun? I am thinking a filter, regulator, and water separator. Are there any all in one units that you guys would recommend?

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

1076 posts in 2098 days


#25 posted 10-28-2017 10:34 AM

seperator/filter, regulator. a reg at the gun is wise.
are ya lookin to go cheap? if so, build a water seperator. i cant find a pic of mine, but heres a pic to go off of

this isnt something to use pex pipe on- youre going to want copper to help cool the air and condense it.
after that,this or something similar

https://www.autobodytoolmart.com/devilbiss-finishline-120cfm-air-line-filter-50cfm-regulator-130099-p-14418.aspx

if ya want to spend some $$$$ then something similar to this
https://www.autobodytoolmart.com/devilbiss-camair-ct30-series-desiccant-air-dryerfilter-system-ct-plus-p-15078.aspx

althouth ill say that with my copper pipe seperator and devilbiss filter/ regulator, over about 20 vehicles painted, a dozen sets of mc tins,tons of woodworking projects, and lots of odds and ends people would bring to me to paint, i havent ever had a moisture problem.

one note:
its wise to have an airhose dedicated to spraying.

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

478 posts in 1539 days


#26 posted 10-28-2017 11:58 AM



seperator/filter, regulator. a reg at the gun is wise.
are ya lookin to go cheap? if so, build a water seperator. i cant find a pic of mine, but heres a pic to go off of

this isnt something to use pex pipe on- youre going to want copper to help cool the air and condense it.
after that,this or something similar

https://www.autobodytoolmart.com/devilbiss-finishline-120cfm-air-line-filter-50cfm-regulator-130099-p-14418.aspx

if ya want to spend some $$$$ then something similar to this
https://www.autobodytoolmart.com/devilbiss-camair-ct30-series-desiccant-air-dryerfilter-system-ct-plus-p-15078.aspx

althouth ill say that with my copper pipe seperator and devilbiss filter/ regulator, over about 20 vehicles painted, a dozen sets of mc tins,tons of woodworking projects, and lots of odds and ends people would bring to me to paint, i havent ever had a moisture problem.

one note:
its wise to have an airhose dedicated to spraying.

- tomsteve

I had already planned to run my line like the picture you posted. I also plan on buying a dedicated hose for spraying. But I can not afford a $200+ dollar filter+regulator. I am planning to order a QualSpray HVLP gun and one of their air line filters. Their filter is $50. I am also planning to use a regulator from Lowes at the compressor and on my gun. Unless you can give me any reason not to use those? Would I need anything else?

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

6784 posts in 2599 days


#27 posted 10-28-2017 12:29 PM


Each to their own, I went with type M copper and sliver solder. Type M is the thicker walled and is approved for air. Home Depot has it.
- AlaskaGuy

Thicker than what, M copper pipe is the thinnest available in my area?

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

1076 posts in 2098 days


#28 posted 10-28-2017 12:47 PM

if the qualspray filter youre referring to is similar to this:
https://www.amazon.com/Biltek-Compressor-Filter-Regulator-Pressure/dp/B00K326BT4

imo, they arent the best for the price. they dont filter the air good enough;the reason i went to the system i mentioned above- i was getting oil and dirt in my finishes.

imo, this or something similar would be better
https://www.amazon.com/Motor-Guard-M-60-Submicronic-Compressed/dp/B000WZYKAE
theres a cartridge inside thats replacable and does a good job of removing all contaminates.

HOWEVER, jeff jewitt has qualspray on his site
http://homesteadfinishingproducts.com
and i tend to trust what he says.

im not sure the quality of the lowes regulators, but try em and find out.

anything else ya need?? ALWAYS!!!LOLOLOL

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1383 posts in 1374 days


#29 posted 10-28-2017 12:53 PM

It find it easier to dial in my spray gun if i filter and regulate right at the base of the gun.

I use this compact regulator and gauge combo

DeVilbiss HAV511 Air Adjusting Valve with Gauge https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000M1DCQ6/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_O0h9zb7AY22F0

And a small inline filter like this

DeVilbiss HAF507K2 Whirlwind Disposable Air Filter, (Pack of 2) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002NIXNAG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_l2h9zbFY4WV4V

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

478 posts in 1539 days


#30 posted 10-28-2017 02:30 PM



It find it easier to dial in my spray gun if i filter and regulate right at the base of the gun.

I use this compact regulator and gauge combo

DeVilbiss HAV511 Air Adjusting Valve with Gauge https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000M1DCQ6/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_O0h9zb7AY22F0

And a small inline filter like this

DeVilbiss HAF507K2 Whirlwind Disposable Air Filter, (Pack of 2) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002NIXNAG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_l2h9zbFY4WV4V

- TungOil

I plan to have the QualSpray filter (and whatever regulator I go with) next to my air line drop in my paint room. Then run an in-line filter and regulator on my spray gun.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

5857 posts in 2266 days


#31 posted 10-28-2017 06:23 PM

You might want to look into Maxline tubing kits that are made just for this. Amazon and other places sell various length kits with joints and other attachments.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

478 posts in 1539 days


#32 posted 10-29-2017 12:12 PM



seperator/filter, regulator. a reg at the gun is wise.
are ya lookin to go cheap? if so, build a water seperator. i cant find a pic of mine, but heres a pic to go off of

this isnt something to use pex pipe on- youre going to want copper to help cool the air and condense it.
after that,this or something similar

https://www.autobodytoolmart.com/devilbiss-finishline-120cfm-air-line-filter-50cfm-regulator-130099-p-14418.aspx

if ya want to spend some $$$$ then something similar to this
https://www.autobodytoolmart.com/devilbiss-camair-ct30-series-desiccant-air-dryerfilter-system-ct-plus-p-15078.aspx

althouth ill say that with my copper pipe seperator and devilbiss filter/ regulator, over about 20 vehicles painted, a dozen sets of mc tins,tons of woodworking projects, and lots of odds and ends people would bring to me to paint, i havent ever had a moisture problem.

one note:
its wise to have an airhose dedicated to spraying.

- tomsteve

Would you guys recommend that when I copy this diagram on this post from Tomsteve with regards to my airlines that I put this up/down up/down piping next to my compressor, or would it be better to locate it in my paint room on the last end of the air line before my hose + paint gun?

In the diagram posted above it appears to be located next to the compressor. But to me it would make more sense to locate it in the paint room closer to where I will have my drop for the paint gun. I already plan to have my main leg going from the compressor to the entrance of my hall way slopes downward towards my compressor.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

1076 posts in 2098 days


#33 posted 10-29-2017 12:49 PM

imo, its wise to catch the moisture and cool the air as soon as it comes out of the tank. ive seen a few setups where the air is piped right off the pump through the cooler then through the tank.
the other filter and regulator id say put in the paint room.
a little extra insurance is to, in the paint booth, put a “T” in the air line, have the filter and regulator come off of that, then run a foot or so of piping off the “T” down a foot or so with another petcock/drain.

View Sparks500's profile

Sparks500

279 posts in 1209 days


#34 posted 10-29-2017 01:08 PM

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

478 posts in 1539 days


#35 posted 10-29-2017 01:10 PM



imo, its wise to catch the moisture and cool the air as soon as it comes out of the tank. ive seen a few setups where the air is piped right off the pump through the cooler then through the tank.
the other filter and regulator id say put in the paint room.
a little extra insurance is to, in the paint booth, put a “T” in the air line, have the filter and regulator come off of that, then run a foot or so of piping off the “T” down a foot or so with another petcock/drain.

- tomsteve

What kind of drain/petcock would be suitable for these air lines? I will likely be using either 3/4” black pipe or 3/4” Pex. Also, what fittings would I use to connect my filter + regulator, the petcock/drain and the air hose (on both ends of the line)? For either 3/4” black pipe or 3/4” Pex?

View pontic's profile

pontic

801 posts in 1487 days


#36 posted 10-29-2017 02:20 PM

I use a desiccant dryer after the tank and use a HYVAC rater compressor. (Copeland dual piston is what I have)
It costs a little more about 15-20% more. The tolerances are much tighter so the blowby is soooo much les and you have negligible oil in your lines and therefore on your finishes. Water is easy to get out oil is not. Runup to working psi is also faster as well. You also can get the job done with a smaller compressor. That’s what I think.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

1076 posts in 2098 days


#37 posted 10-29-2017 03:01 PM

if using 3/4” back pipe, a 3/4” ball valve will work for a drain

on those threaded fittings, its wise to use pipe dope over teflon tape. seals much better.

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

478 posts in 1539 days


#38 posted 10-29-2017 04:21 PM



if using 3/4” back pipe, a 3/4” ball valve will work for a drain

on those threaded fittings, its wise to use pipe dope over teflon tape. seals much better.

- tomsteve

So what if I were to use 3/4” Pex? How would I get the ball valve, the air fittings and the regulator + filter to mate up to the pex?

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6102 posts in 3188 days


#39 posted 10-29-2017 07:51 PM

Each to their own, I went with type M copper and sliver solder. Type M is the thicker walled and is approved for air. Home Depot has it.
- AlaskaGuy

Thicker than what, M copper pipe is the thinnest available in my area?

- bigblockyeti


I got my numbers mixed up. There is type M and L. One it thicker that the other. This link should you out immensely.

https://www.familyhandyman.com/plumbing/plumbing-repair/copper-pipe-types/view-all/

A quick Google search would have cleared in up for you.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

6784 posts in 2599 days


#40 posted 10-29-2017 08:34 PM

Zero confusion on my part, just wondering if you were referencing M as thicker than something that is not readily available.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View jonah's profile

jonah

2129 posts in 4177 days


#41 posted 10-29-2017 10:33 PM

So what if I were to use 3/4” Pex? How would I get the ball valve, the air fittings and the regulator + filter to mate up to the pex?

- SweetTea


They make ball valves with compression fittings that connect to Pex.

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

934 posts in 2463 days


#42 posted 10-30-2017 02:14 AM

The Northern Tool item that was linked by Sparks500 makes the most sense to me if there is much of a run or system of connection points involved. Amazon has a number of air supply kits as well.

For a short simple air header, I’d just use black pipe and get on with it. I cannot say that I find soldering copper to be any fun, but to each his own, of course.
.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View Arlin Eastman's profile

Arlin Eastman

4544 posts in 3440 days


#43 posted 10-30-2017 02:21 AM

Any way you can more the compressor to the paint shop?

Also me and the vets are wanting a air compressor like the one you have and wondering where you got it and how much?

-- It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

View jonah's profile

jonah

2129 posts in 4177 days


#44 posted 10-30-2017 02:35 AM

The Husky brand is sold at Home Depot.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

1076 posts in 2098 days


#45 posted 10-30-2017 01:49 PM


Also me and the vets are wanting a air compressor like the one you have and wondering where you got it and how much?

- Arlin Eastman

if youre referring to the planer with compressor attachment, i think thats special order. :)
if youre referring to the 60 gal husky, looks like this one

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-60-Gal-Stationary-Electric-Air-Compressor-C602H/205389936

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