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Reply by CaptainKlutz

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Posted on Garage Workshop / Shared Space

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CaptainKlutz

2059 posts in 2060 days


#1 posted 11-09-2018 11:31 AM

+1 Gas powered equipment should not be stored in garage attached to living space, ESPECIALLY if you have gas hot water heater in garage. I use a mid sized outdoor rubber maid storage box for lawn mower, chain saw, and fuels.

I keep all my shop solvents, paints in industrial flammable storage cabinet picked up at auction cheap.

Solution(s) I adopted to help make shop easy to clean and reconfigure as needed:

1) Use wire rack shelving units on wheels for near wall storage. BORG sells them cheap. As long as the heavy stuff is on bottom, stable & easy to move around. If you keep the wood tools, separate from car tools, separate from house repair storage, separate from camping stuff, etc; you can ‘stack’ the racks tight side by side to each other with short side against wall, and move them apart to gain access as needed, like moving library shelves. Makes storage extremely flexible, sometimes I have them all against one wall, and other times I line them up them against 2 side walls. Thanks to wire shelves and everything inside a storage container or box, can use air gun and compressor to de-dust the racks the day before I start any finishing work (with dust filter running overnight).

2) Storing bikes in wood shop is royal pain. Best solution I have found is this rack from HF. It is not perfect. Wobbles some when you move it around fully loaded, wheels are sort of small if you have large seams in concrete, but it gets 4 bikes off the ground & they all can be used/moved as needed as one unit. Note – it does require person to lift the top wheel off the rack, so young kids can’t really get bikes down.

3) Storing long handled yard tools, like shovel, rake, brooms, etc; I use a Rubbermaid commercial ‘Brute’ trash can with lid and mobile base (dolly). Punch or hole saw cut 1.5 – 2” holes for handles of tools to stick down thru lid. Make 1-2 opening(s) 2” wide and 6-12” long for weird stuff like electric hedge trimmers. As long as you have some heavy stuff like sledge hammer, axe with short handles to keep some eight near lid, it moves and stores ok. If it gets top heavy with only long shovels/rakes, put a couple of thin sand bags in can along sides to prevent tipping over, that or a couple inches of gravel.

4) If do not have attic/indoor space for seasonal stuff, then I use cheap Hyloft ceiling mounted racks above the garage door. Can usually get 15-16” of space in garage, which is enough for one layer of (6) storage boxes. 29-30” will get you 2 layers and a lot of space for stuff like xmas decorations. Can also buy a more expensive heavy duty version, or make you own and use it for wood storage.

In case it is not apparent; my storage is all extremely mobile. Currently renting my domicile. This is 3rd place in last 5 years. Only thing I hang on walls is my wood storage racks, some ceiling racks, or occasional used upper kitchen cabinets when I find them for $10 at a garage sale. Moving above rolling racks for short in-town move is easy: wrap in shrink wrap and roll onto moving truck/trailer – no need to pack/unpack.
When I had more permanent shop, I built wall cabinets for storing stuff, that fit above my rolling wire shelves.

Thanks for reading to bottom of long response, hope it helps!
Best Luck outfitting your work shop.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!


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