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Reply by knotscott

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Posted on thin kerf blade for ridgid r4512 - how useful is 0.06 thinner kerf?

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knotscott

8385 posts in 4223 days


#1 posted 08-18-2018 12:18 PM

As mentioned, stock blades are typically pretty poor examples of saw blades….whatever is cheapest will usually do in the minds of the supplier. Buying a better blade should yield better results than a stock blade, should have better edge life, and are usually worth the cost of having resharpened. As long as the blade creates a kerf wide enough for the riving knife to pass through, the difference in widths of a typical 3/32” TK blade should be fine whether 0.093 or 0.098, or even 0.104”....it’s really a fairly small percentage change. Keep in mind that the total kerf includes the width of the teeth, plus any blade and arbor runout.

A decent 40T or 50T tooth TK is a jack of all trades type blade that will give good results in many applications, but excellent results in none. A 60T to 80T crosscut blade will have less tearout in crosscuts and ply than a 40T or 50T blade, but will create more heat and burning in thicker rip cuts, which is where adding a 24T rip blade comes in. The suitable Freud crosscut models are the LU88, LU74, or LU79 (Diablo D1060 or D1080) +LU87 or D1024 rip blade, but Marples, Infinity, CMT, Amana, Tenryu, and others have good choices are reasonable prices too. While I’m not a fan of many of the current Oldham blades, in this case the Oldham Pro 100PT80 80T is still a good bet IMO for an 80T crosscut blade if cost is a concern. Separate blades do cost more overall, but they will also last longer and get the most performance from the saw. It really depends on you and your objectives.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....


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