LumberJocks

Reply by TungOil

  • Advertise with us

Posted on Joiner

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1383 posts in 1371 days


#1 posted 08-08-2017 10:22 PM

It may depend on the preferred workflow. My workflow has the jointer first, not the planer. Goes like this, I would imagine that some others have a very similar workflow as well. This assumes rough cut stock (surfaced no sides).

1) rough cut to length (radial arm/miter sawl)
2) straighten one edge (jointer)
3) for very wide stock I may rough rip to width, perhaps 1/4 oversize (TS). This helps with the next step
4) flatten one face (jointer)
5) final thickness (planer)

Then I move on to final dimensioning cuts:

6) final CTL (radial arm/chop saw)
7) If needed, re-joint the previously jointed edge, only if stress relief from the previous cuts has allowed a hook
8) rip to final width +1/32” (TS)
9) clean up the final cut with a 1/32” pass (jointer)

This workflow can be simplified greatly by buying S2S lumber and eliminating the planer, but you will need to carefully select material to avoid boards with any significant cup/bow. The workflow for me would simplify to:

1) rough cut to length (radial arm/miter sawl)
2) straighten one edge (jointer)
3) rip slightly oversize (TS)

Then I move on to final dimensioning cuts:

4) final CTL (radial arm/chop saw)
5) If needed, re-joint the previously jointed edge, only if stress relief from the previous cuts has allowed a hook
6) rip to final width +1/32” (TS)
7) clean up the final cut with a 1/32” pass (jointer)

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"


DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com