LumberJocks

has anyone run into this ?

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by recycle1943 posted 05-26-2019 02:57 PM 501 reads 0 times favorited 22 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’ve been commissioned to make an item (actually 2 items) that are 1/2” thick, basically 8” wide and up to 19” wide with irregular shapes. Both items are near carbon copies of each other but different in their own way.

Here is my dilemma – both will be mounted to a corrugated aluminum sign board. The board is rather simple in that it is 2 very thin sheets of aluminum with plasti corrugation between them and 1/4” thick. The board will be 8’ wide and 10’ high with my portion will be taking up 2 areas of 48” and 54” by up to 19” wide wich will be the right and left hands as pictured below.
The picture is the artists concept of the end result which I am trying to attain. It’s neither here nor there but the hands are walnut with butternut as the lighter accent.

Herein lies my dilimma – I have decided to mount the “hands” using super glue in moderate amounts so as not to squeeze out from under the hands.
It has been mentioned that there should be screws from the back into the wood to hold the hands in place. I should mention that the board will be mounted on a wall just as the picture shows.

Has anybody had any experience with a situation like this and what was the long term result ?

the real question – super glue alone ? super glue with screws ?

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them



22 comments so far

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

3176 posts in 2036 days


#1 posted 05-26-2019 04:36 PM

You’re adhesing two disparate materials. Super glue could break down in the wrong conditions or over time. Epoxy would be a far better choice, but honestly, if it were me, I’d take a clue from our construction site brothers and use liquid nails. Screws are completely unnecessary.

-- There are good ships and there are wood ships, the ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships and may they always be. http://www.geraldlhunsucker.com/

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

101 posts in 115 days


#2 posted 05-26-2019 04:57 PM

Why not use screws?
I would in a heartbeat. You’ll never have to worry about whether your adhesive is going to hold or not.
I would use the screws and some Loctite (PL) premium 3x construction adhesive.
Liquid Nail sucks! But that’s just my opinion from the experiences I have had with it.

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2770 posts in 2578 days


#3 posted 05-26-2019 06:15 PM

Dick,
I think screws are the best choice. Glue, epoxy, liquid nails, etc. are great for captive components like a tenon in a mortise, but if I correctly understand the situation, these hands are surface mounted and the force on the glue will be in shear. I don’t believe any glue offers strength in shear, and will eventually fail, but I also am assuming that these hands have some weight to them.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

2905 posts in 2010 days


#4 posted 05-26-2019 06:17 PM



You’re adhesing two disparate materials. Super glue could break down in the wrong conditions or over time. Epoxy would be a far better choice, but honestly, if it were me, I’d take a clue from our construction site brothers and use liquid nails. Screws are completely unnecessary.

- Jerry

Thanks Jerry,
Epoxy is just about out of the question because of squeeze out and as well, applying pressure to hold it in place till it dries it nearly impossible

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

2905 posts in 2010 days


#5 posted 05-26-2019 06:24 PM



Why not use screws?
I would in a heartbeat. You ll never have to worry about whether your adhesive is going to hold or not.
I would use the screws and some Loctite (PL) premium 3x construction adhesive.
Liquid Nail sucks! But that s just my opinion from the experiences I have had with it.

- LeeRoyMan

construction adhesive could be an answer but the viscosity of it becomes a problem. When I say problem, I’m refering to the thickness of it and applying pressure to hold it. The fingers WILL NOT accept any pressure applied because of the grain pattern of the wood. It will snap off, don’t ask how I know that !

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

2905 posts in 2010 days


#6 posted 05-26-2019 06:35 PM


Dick,
I think screws are the best choice. Glue, epoxy, liquid nails, etc. are great for captive components like a tenon in a mortise, but if I correctly understand the situation, these hands are surface mounted and the force on the glue will be in shear. I don t believe any glue offers strength in shear, and will eventually fail, but I also am assuming that these hands have some weight to them.

- Oldtool

I just weighed one arm and hand ( 3.4 lbs ) they are a 2 piece with each being around 24” each. That’s about as long as I could handle on the scroll saw and you are right about the shear. Never thought about that being a factor. For some reason shear just never occured to me.
I attached a picture – perhaps a half dozen stragically placed screws on each one is the answer. I still believe super glue will capture it long enough to get screws installed.

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

864 posts in 1498 days


#7 posted 05-26-2019 11:12 PM

Morning Dick
Just thinking out loud here, could you tie wire them on?
Home Depot sells some really thin good stainless steel wire.
Drill two small holes, run the wire through then tie at the back with pliers, the wire should pull tight and countersink itself, then maybe some putty over the wire on the face.
Just a thought.

Regards
Anthm

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

2905 posts in 2010 days


#8 posted 05-26-2019 11:33 PM

It’s been decided that the surface not be marred with anything. I’ve already spent nearly a month and more than several board feet of both specie trying to accomplish an acceptable grain continuity.
This is going to be a giving tree with 300 plus donor leaves in their new $500,000 recreation hall

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

864 posts in 1498 days


#9 posted 05-27-2019 12:31 AM

Understood and rightly so , They look great, Nice job, Hmm difficult one, Can you house thin aluminium strips on the back side and then tie wire through the aluminium? Or sonething like that, tiny Wooden blocks glued on the back side
Not sure.
Anth

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

864 posts in 1498 days


#10 posted 05-27-2019 12:32 AM

Any pics of the aluminium sign board that they need attached to????

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

2905 posts in 2010 days


#11 posted 05-27-2019 12:58 AM



Any pics of the aluminium sign board that they need attached to????

- anthm27


I was given a sample of the sign board – it’s totally rigid regarding flex but really fragile regarding dents etc because the aluminum is so thin.
The board looks just like the wall of a card board box except aluminum on both sides of the corrugation

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

864 posts in 1498 days


#12 posted 05-27-2019 01:05 AM

Seems glue maybe the only option, That liquid nails is OK at the start but doesn’t age well, Being inside it may be OK though.
Interesting problem you have on your hands there.

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

2905 posts in 2010 days


#13 posted 05-27-2019 01:37 AM



Seems glue maybe the only option, That liquid nails is OK at the start but doesn t age well, Being inside it may be OK though.
Interesting problem you have on your hands there.

- anthm27


I’m afraid of anything but super glue and clear gorilla glue with super being my preference.
I glued a couple pieces of walnut and butternut to the board sample using both glues and it took a hell of a whack with a hammer to get them off. I think my real concern is will loctite super glue degrade and release if it spends its life between a hunk of wood and aluminum and indoors in a controlled environment.
Controlled environment in this case is 50 to 70 or so degrees

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2685 posts in 1610 days


#14 posted 05-27-2019 02:10 PM

Here’s what I’d do.

Use silicone, E6000 in particular is very strong. Apply a band down the long axis (with the grain) using enough to avoid squeeze out. Roughen up the aluminum in this area a bit with some coarse paper for a better adhesive bite.

Place the wood and then put sand bags over the top to both conform to the shape and allow a heavy object to be placed on top of the bags to compress everything. As an alternative to sand bags, you could place a layer of Saran wrap atop the wood then add a layer of fine sand. Trowel it out flat then place a flat board with weight on top of that.

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

2905 posts in 2010 days


#15 posted 05-27-2019 02:46 PM



Here s what I d do.

Use silicone, E6000 in particular is very strong. Apply a band down the long axis (with the grain) using enough to avoid squeeze out. Roughen up the aluminum in this area a bit with some coarse paper for a better adhesive bite.

Place the wood and then put sand bags over the top to both conform to the shape and allow a heavy object to be placed on top of the bags to compress everything. As an alternative to sand bags, you could place a layer of Saran wrap atop the wood then add a layer of fine sand. Trowel it out flat then place a flat board with weight on top of that.

- splintergroup

Do you think that would eliminate screws from the back side – I’m pretty aprehensive about screws thru aluminum into 1/2” walnut

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

showing 1 through 15 of 22 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com