LumberJocks

Shelf / photo examples

  • Advertise with us
Project by SST posted 03-13-2007 05:52 PM 2695 views 2 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I see we’re talking about photographing our projects, so here’s an example of a before and after pic of my shelf project using a digital camera and a photoshop type program to crop, enhance tone, and remove distracting background.

This is a small shelf I made for my son that will mount below a hallway mirror. I wanted to give more substance (for lack of a better term) so I made it thicker by trying kerfing for the first time and adding upper and lower “decks” to go better with the mass of the mirror. I was able to use pine and just seal it as it will be antiqued to match the mirror. I wasn’t as happy as I’d have liked with the bending job, but it was my first try since I learned the procedure (in shop class in the last millennium), so if I try again, I’ll get better. -SST

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you





14 comments so far

View BassBully's profile

BassBully

261 posts in 4662 days


#1 posted 03-13-2007 06:05 PM

SST,

Can you describe how you hang this shelf. I would like to begin creating floating shelves but I’m not sure how they would safely hang on the wall. Thank you.

-- There are three types of people in the world, those who can count and those who can't!

View Brandon 's profile

Brandon

30 posts in 4737 days


#2 posted 03-13-2007 06:08 PM

Nice looking design and looks great for a first time bend job! The first one I did (TV shelf) was just paneling and that was difficult enough.

Kudos to you :-)

-- Brandon, Maine, www.maineweddingtrellis.com

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18619 posts in 4725 days


#3 posted 03-13-2007 07:30 PM

how wonderful!!
another amazing “FIRST”

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribele, Young Living Wellness )

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 4879 days


#4 posted 03-13-2007 07:38 PM

Pine and other soft woods are the hardest to bend due to their longer fibers. It looks real good to me.

View Don's profile

Don

2603 posts in 4742 days


#5 posted 03-14-2007 12:35 AM

Nice piece, SST. With what are you unhappy? Looks good to me.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://www.dpb-photos.com/

View SST's profile

SST

790 posts in 4760 days


#6 posted 03-14-2007 03:29 PM

There was a question about how I hang the shelf, so I’ll post a pic and diagram on the backside of it as well. As to my unhappiness, I can notice a little evidence of the kerfing on the front of the bent piece in that the bend is not always smooth, but seems to have little flat spots as well. I’m thinking if I try this again, I’d use a thin kerf blade and more cuts per inch to smooth it out. My daughter-in-law loves it, though, so I guess I’m always my own worst critic.
I guess that’s at least part of what drives us all to create nice stuff.
When I look at some of the pieces on this site, it’s really very humbling to see what some of you are producing, yet that’s another part of what drives me to say “there’s no reason why I can’t do something like that”, and then move up to more demanding projects. I think that’s how we keep getting better. -SST

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18619 posts in 4725 days


#7 posted 03-14-2007 04:59 PM

Lumberjocks.com really is a great place, isn’t it!! ? !

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribele, Young Living Wellness )

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 4726 days


#8 posted 03-14-2007 05:04 PM

A nice shelf SST. That curved design is definitely eye catching.

Yes, we are definitely our own worse critics. Each item I build I find flaws, but the customers just love them. Go figure…

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4563 posts in 4876 days


#9 posted 03-17-2007 04:08 AM

Great looking shelf. What problems did you encounter using the kerfing that you weren’t pleased with? I’ve been wanting to try it. I guess I’ll get around to it, soon.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View SST's profile

SST

790 posts in 4760 days


#10 posted 03-17-2007 08:27 PM

As to my kerfing issues, I used a 64 tooth carbide tip blade on my first try and found, at least with the pine, that the wood was chipping out on the remaining portion between the cuts, so I switched to an old, but unused, Vermont American plywood blade I had on the wall with about a bazillion teeth (can you tell that I’m not much of a blade connoisseur) and that helped a lot.
I’ll probably learn more on the whole blade thing from hanging out here, but keep in mind that I’m doing my woodworking on a pair of 55 year old shopsmiths, and I think the blades I’ve been used to were from the bronze age.
Anyway, that’s not why I was disappointed with my project. What I didn’t like in the result was that at certain angles, you could see evidence of the kerfing on the outside of the curve, in that the curve was not perfectly smooth. It showed little segments where the wood had been cut on the other side. I’m not sure if I’m describing that so you can understand but, simplistically, it would be like if you made 6 kerf cuts and when you bent it into a circle, you got a hexagon instead, each part between kerfs had a little flat spot, even though I seemed to be making the cuts as close together as I could. Anyway, it came out nice enough that I’ll probably try another project sometime and see if I can improve on the first one. After all, where would all the sawdust in the world come from if we quit trying? -SST

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you

View Karson's profile

Karson

35209 posts in 4965 days


#11 posted 03-17-2007 11:18 PM

I was wondering what would happen if you cut the portion that you wanted to bend, and made a mdf fill strip that had the curve that you wanted and you just bent it around the mdf. then fasten it like you did with the existing one. You would need to use a bandsaw to cut the strip that you wanted to bend.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Appomattox Virginia [email protected]

View SST's profile

SST

790 posts in 4760 days


#12 posted 03-17-2007 11:47 PM

Actually, Karson, you just gave me an idea that might solve my problem. Next time I try this, I might kerf it with my bandsaw. With the very thin blade, I could do more cuts/inch and maybe that would smooth it out. Who knows…anyway, it’s always fun to try new ways to do stuff. I’m not sure what you meant by mdf strip, although by the description, I think I got it figured out, and it seems worth trying. -SST

-- Accuracy is not in your power tool, it's in you

View Karson's profile

Karson

35209 posts in 4965 days


#13 posted 03-18-2007 12:49 AM

I was saying (at least was trying to say. Make an mdf block and attach it to the shelf in the position that you want the bend. Then you bend the thin wood around the corner. Think of it as thin veneer bent around the solid mdf filler strip. Keep your solid wood in the center and slice it thinner at the ends where you want to bend it.

Maybe it isn’t any more clear this time either.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Appomattox Virginia [email protected]

View WistysWoodWorkingWonders's profile

WistysWoodWorkingWonders

12785 posts in 3722 days


#14 posted 03-09-2010 05:13 AM

great job on this… the curves look great in the pics… nice job for your first attempt at curving (bending) wood…

-- New Project = New Tool... it's just the way it is, don't fight it... :)

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com