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Endgrain floor

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Project by Thomas Porter posted 02-03-2007 06:29 AM 7726 views 14 times favorited 36 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Endgrain floor
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This is a redwood endgrain floor that I made from over 177 – 8ft. redwood beams. There are over 12,000 tiles laid here. More cuts and sanding than you can imagine, but well worth it.

-- Thomas Porter, Phoenix, AZ, www.thomasporter.com





36 comments so far

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 5211 days


#1 posted 02-03-2007 06:50 AM

Beautiful, I bet it looks better in real life. How thick are they ? That floor should last forever.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Thomas Porter's profile

Thomas Porter

127 posts in 5043 days


#2 posted 02-03-2007 06:59 AM

Each piece is 1” thick. It would take a lifetime of sanding to go through that floor.

-- Thomas Porter, Phoenix, AZ, www.thomasporter.com

View Don's profile

Don

2603 posts in 5088 days


#3 posted 02-03-2007 09:21 AM

Wow, this is incredible. I’ve never seen anything like it. Didi you glue each one to the sub floor? What goes between each tile.

-- CanuckDon "I just love small wooden boxes!" http://www.dpb-photos.com/

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18619 posts in 5072 days


#4 posted 02-03-2007 02:10 PM

and I was in awe by the WoodWhisperer’s end grain cutting board!! I thought that IT was a lot of work.. HA !
This is magnificent..

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribele, Young Living Wellness )

View Thomas Porter's profile

Thomas Porter

127 posts in 5043 days


#5 posted 02-03-2007 04:16 PM

I used a special mastic to adhere the pieces to the subfloor and laid it like tile. The gaps are filled with a sawdust/acrylic mixture that I made from the vast amounts of sawdust laying around after the cutting. Then, when you sand and finish the floor is smoother and sealed up.

One note, though. If I had it to do over again, I would put one coat of finish on prior to doing the gap filling, because it can seal up some of the endgrain and not allow it to be finished properly. It’s not very noticeable in the grand scheme, but if you’re a perfectionist, you’ll want to do it this way.

The largest room I’ve ever seen done is the Country Music Hall of Fame. You might be able to find pictures of their lobby in there. It’s gorgeous. There’s also a video floating around from This Old House about “cobblewood” flooring. It’s quick, but informative. I’ll try and find it and post a link.

-- Thomas Porter, Phoenix, AZ, www.thomasporter.com

View Karson's profile

Karson

35229 posts in 5312 days


#6 posted 02-03-2007 04:50 PM

What were the dimentions of the square ends of the beams, and did you try to true them up before cutting slices?

Very beautiful/

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Appomattox Virginia [email protected]

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 5226 days


#7 posted 02-03-2007 06:07 PM

I’ve never seen any thing like it. Thanks

View Obi's profile

Obi

2214 posts in 5148 days


#8 posted 02-03-2007 06:24 PM

WOW. And being endgrain, I’l bet it sucks up everything. Good point about one coat of finish. I’m tellin y’all, the ideas that are coming out of Lumberjocks makes every other Wood Forum look like a bunch of first-graders. Every other site wants to talk about making tables, and router techniques, but I’ve never seen anything like the stuff that comes out of here.

This site is the Greatest Site I’ve ever seen. The people are all friendly, the work is 11 on a scale of 10… gets my vote for “Woodworking Website of the Year”. Way to Go, Martin

View Karson's profile

Karson

35229 posts in 5312 days


#9 posted 02-03-2007 06:48 PM

Was this placed over cement of over a wooden subfloor?

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Appomattox Virginia [email protected]

View Thomas Porter's profile

Thomas Porter

127 posts in 5043 days


#10 posted 02-03-2007 08:03 PM

To answer your questions:

the tiles’ finished size is 2.5”x3.5”. I purchased the redwood at a Home Depot and had them deliver it to my house. I had to mill them all down to the same width in the planer beforehand so that they were more exacting.

As far as a subfloor… contrary to popular belief you do not have to use a subfloor. Preferably you would want 3/4” marine plywood, but Bruce Hardwood Floors makes a mastic for adhering wood to concrete that is also a moisture barrier. That is what I had to do with this condo, because I didn’t want to rework the doors/doorjams, etc. to fit a 2+” floor.

-- Thomas Porter, Phoenix, AZ, www.thomasporter.com

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 5239 days


#11 posted 02-03-2007 09:45 PM

Wow, that floor is fantastic…. it’s the largest cutting board I’ve ever seen :) they could host a Iron Chef style battle royale!

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View rookster's profile

rookster

67 posts in 5062 days


#12 posted 02-03-2007 10:32 PM

Wow! I’m almost afraid to ask: how long did it take you to do this?

-- Rookster, (http://www.robertkarl.org/woodworkingblog/)

View Thomas Porter's profile

Thomas Porter

127 posts in 5043 days


#13 posted 02-04-2007 06:04 AM

All together from milling to final finish it took ~150-200 hours. It’s hard to say. I had some help doing the cuts (which took the longest), and I had help laying the tiles (took 3 days). The finish work was more than I expected. Because it’s endgrain, it soaked up the first coat of acrylic so fast that I used 4 times the recommended amount just to feed the thirsty wood.

A fun side note. GM, GE, quite a few old workshops, and even some cities in Florida have had endgrain floors and even streets for years (in some cases 100’s of years). The endgrain soaks up the finish so well that it becomes even harder and water resistent. I’m going to be putting it in my current workshop. It’s softer than the concrete floors, looks nice, and is very durable.

When I was first starting this floor I made a test patch out of pine, finished it with acrylic, and took a hammer to it. It was easy to repair and replace. You can replace just one tile, or a section, and because it’s just a natural color, it’s easily matchable.

Can you tell I like endgrain floors? :-)

-- Thomas Porter, Phoenix, AZ, www.thomasporter.com

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 5211 days


#14 posted 02-04-2007 08:20 PM

One of my magazines’ had an article on endgrain floors so I ran a search for Endgrain Floors Check this out, it’s kind of interesting.
The town of Hibbing had to move, & relocate in the early 1920s because of Iron Ore beneath the town. The old town was paved with creasoted pine blocks. People used to burn them to heat there homes during the depression days. The move was completed in the early 1950s.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 5239 days


#15 posted 02-04-2007 09:06 PM

Thanks for sharing that link Dick. Wow the options and possibilities abound!

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

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