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Mystery Wood

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Project by MovingChips posted 02-01-2022 03:51 PM 946 views 0 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This project started off as a mystery, in more then one way. Not only did I have no idea what I would make from this piece of wood, but I have no idea what the species of wood is.

I am very happy with the wood colors, the grain structure, the shape of the bowl. Everything seemed to fall into place. I just don’t know what wood it is.

This weeks video: Noodle Bowl

Thanks





21 comments so far

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

1807 posts in 1401 days


#1 posted 02-01-2022 04:18 PM

Cedar

-- You know, this site doesn't require woodworking skills, but you should know how to write.

View pottz's profile

pottz

26631 posts in 2482 days


#2 posted 02-01-2022 04:18 PM

nice little bowl chips,that wood im not even gonna guess.lets just call it pretty wood.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

7087 posts in 3120 days


#3 posted 02-01-2022 04:32 PM

I’m betting on aromatic cedar and Ramen noodles with green onion tips – YUM ! for both

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

9799 posts in 2885 days


#4 posted 02-01-2022 05:27 PM

If it is cedar, the smell would leave little doubt. It is also pretty soft and light. My first impression was mesquite but they usually don’t have that much sapwood, here in TX anyway. Regardless, it is pretty.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View LesB's profile

LesB

3506 posts in 4940 days


#5 posted 02-01-2022 05:56 PM

Pretty bowl.

You said it was heavy and watching the turning process the way it cut and how quickly our fiinish built up to a shine it is obviously not a soft cedar wood. I’m going to speculate and say it is Juniper....

-- Les B, Oregon

View pottz's profile

pottz

26631 posts in 2482 days


#6 posted 02-01-2022 06:05 PM



Pretty bowl.

You said it was heavy and watching the turning process the way it cut and how quickly our fiinish built up to a shine it is obviously not a soft cedar wood. I m going to speculate and say it is Juniper....

- LesB


+1 cedar is way too soft and you would easily be able to tell from the scent.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

9799 posts in 2885 days


#7 posted 02-01-2022 07:29 PM

Fun fact, there are no native cedars in North America. Most trees we call cedar are in the the cypress family which includes the junipers and arborvitae. True cedars (genus Cedrus) are in the pine family. Deodar cedar which is a true cedar is often planted as an ornamental and probably the only true cedar that most of us have seen. Eastern red and mountain or Ashe cedars are junipers while western red cedar is one of the arborvitae species.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View MovingChips's profile

MovingChips

561 posts in 739 days


#8 posted 02-01-2022 08:26 PM



Cedar

- Phil32

Looking at it I would have said cedar too. BUT it doesn’t smell, cut or feel (weight wise for the size) to be cedar. Good guess though and for all we know it might be. Thanks

View MovingChips's profile

MovingChips

561 posts in 739 days


#9 posted 02-01-2022 08:26 PM



nice little bowl chips,that wood im not even gonna guess.lets just call it pretty wood.

- pottz

LOL pretty wood is a good species :)

View MovingChips's profile

MovingChips

561 posts in 739 days


#10 posted 02-01-2022 08:28 PM



I m betting on aromatic cedar and Ramen noodles with green onion tips – YUM ! for both

- recycle1943

I would ahve thought cedar too, by the looks. However, it doesn’t have the smell of cedar and its much harder. But it could be a strange breed of cedar I’ve not seen before. Thanks

View MovingChips's profile

MovingChips

561 posts in 739 days


#11 posted 02-01-2022 08:33 PM



If it is cedar, the smell would leave little doubt. It is also pretty soft and light. My first impression was mesquite but they usually don t have that much sapwood, here in TX anyway. Regardless, it is pretty.

- Lazyman

I love your thought process, because I went through the same steps in my head… except mesquite. I didn’t think to look at that and to your point (judging by the sap ring size) it was a huge tree (roughly 3ft dia.?). Only the bowl knows and it aint talking! LOL

View MovingChips's profile

MovingChips

561 posts in 739 days


#12 posted 02-01-2022 08:36 PM



Pretty bowl.

You said it was heavy and watching the turning process the way it cut and how quickly our fiinish built up to a shine it is obviously not a soft cedar wood. I m going to speculate and say it is Juniper....

- LesB

Yeah I don’t know much about Juniper trees, so… maybe? Yeah it was certainly not soft wood and didn’t have the cedar smell. Thanks for watching the video

View MovingChips's profile

MovingChips

561 posts in 739 days


#13 posted 02-01-2022 08:44 PM



Fun fact, there are no native cedars in North America. Most trees we call cedar are in the the cypress family which includes the junipers and arborvitae. True cedars (genus Cedrus) are in the pine family. Deodar cedar which is a true cedar is often planted as an ornamental and probably the only true cedar that most of us have seen. Eastern red and mountain or Ashe cedars are junipers while western red cedar is one of the arborvitae species.

- Lazyman

Looking at the data I could find about cyrpess trees, junipers and eastern or western cedars all seem to be softer wood, compared to the wood I turned. BUT there may be some harder wood… lets just umbrella them under cypress family name… that I am not aware of.

Some have suggested it might be cocobolo? I dismissed cocobolo because the wood I turned was more red and I thought cocobolo was more brown. Any thoughts on that?

View pottz's profile

pottz

26631 posts in 2482 days


#14 posted 02-01-2022 10:50 PM


Fun fact, there are no native cedars in North America. Most trees we call cedar are in the the cypress family which includes the junipers and arborvitae. True cedars (genus Cedrus) are in the pine family. Deodar cedar which is a true cedar is often planted as an ornamental and probably the only true cedar that most of us have seen. Eastern red and mountain or Ashe cedars are junipers while western red cedar is one of the arborvitae species.

- Lazyman

Looking at the data I could find about cyrpess trees, junipers and eastern or western cedars all seem to be softer wood, compared to the wood I turned. BUT there may be some harder wood… lets just umbrella them under cypress family name… that I am not aware of.

Some have suggested it might be cocobolo? I dismissed cocobolo because the wood I turned was more red and I thought cocobolo was more brown. Any thoughts on that?

- MovingChips


that wasn’t coco or even close.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View rtbrmb's profile (online now)

rtbrmb

916 posts in 3886 days


#15 posted 02-01-2022 11:44 PM

The grain, shape, heartwood/sapwood contrast….. a very attractive noodle bowl.

Thanks for posting.

Bill in MI

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