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Pot Trivet With Rare Earth Magnets.

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Project by James E McIntyre posted 12-28-2021 08:08 PM 972 views 3 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I noticed other lumberjocks were posting really cool pot trivets and decided to make my own version.

While working on the design and building the stained glass for a Greene & Greene inspired ceiling light, I needed to take a break and had some leftover Mahogany that looked perfect for this project.

This is one of those simple but fun projects I did just to give myself a brake from the more complex one I’m working on.

Here are some photos of the build.


Screwing down the cups and the washers that attract the magnets.


It doesn’t take much coaxing to get the magnets into the cups

The trivet can also be separated for larger pans.

One tip is to put the red dots on the magnets up on one stick and on the other put the the red dots down this will insure that when storing them the magnets won’t repel each other and line up. They will still attract each other but will be a little out of line as they are in this photo.

The only problem with this type of magnetic trivet is don’t forget to remove them before putting the pot back on the stove. I will look like your cooking on a wood burning stove.

Thanks for visiting.

-- James E McIntyre





21 comments so far

View mafe's profile

mafe

13872 posts in 4581 days


#1 posted 12-28-2021 08:39 PM

That’s really clever, I can imagine that being really useful at serving.
Bravo.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1935 posts in 2784 days


#2 posted 12-28-2021 08:40 PM



That s really clever, I can imagine that being really useful at serving.
Bravo.
Best thoughts,
Mads

- mafe

Thanks Mads.

-- James E McIntyre

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

27799 posts in 4597 days


#3 posted 12-28-2021 08:44 PM

Great idea!! Nice work on it…...........Cheers,Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View oldrivers's profile

oldrivers

3148 posts in 3058 days


#4 posted 12-28-2021 09:02 PM

Neat idea thAt should be really nice to have, good job

-- Soli Deo gloria!

View Eric's profile

Eric

5736 posts in 1365 days


#5 posted 12-28-2021 09:30 PM

That is a wonderful idea James, nice simple design.
Appears that the shiplap joint is tight which is good. I do not see any maginet holding the joint

What finish did you use? I have found that butcher block oil make the grain n in Mahogany pop.

-- Eric, building the dream. the "Loft"

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1935 posts in 2784 days


#6 posted 12-28-2021 09:33 PM

Thanks Eric. I ran out of magnets but it stays together when attached to the pot.

I could add one when I order more magnets.

I used 4 coats of tong oil. It seems to take forever for it to dry.

-- James E McIntyre

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

10487 posts in 2074 days


#7 posted 12-28-2021 09:38 PM

Nice, James! Clever design and good execution. My experience with tung oil is that I dilute it 50-50 with mineral spirits, and soak the piece, then wipe clean. Wait 2 or 3 days, then do it again. After three of those soakings, I can switch to straight tung oil and a coat will cure overnight. Maybe two or three full strength coats and I’m done. Very slow process, but worth the wait if you have the time.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1935 posts in 2784 days


#8 posted 12-28-2021 09:51 PM



Neat idea thAt should be really nice to have, good job

- oldrivers

Thanks Oldrivers. I think it would also make a cool gift for friends and family.

-- James E McIntyre

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1935 posts in 2784 days


#9 posted 12-28-2021 09:54 PM



Nice, James! Clever design and good execution. My experience with tung oil is that I dilute it 50-50 with mineral spirits, and soak the piece, then wipe clean. Wait 2 or 3 days, then do it again. After three of those soakings, I can switch to straight tung oil and a coat will cure overnight. Maybe two or three full strength coats and I’m done. Very slow process, but worth the wait if you have the time.

- Dave Polaschek

Thanks Dave. Great advice. I was wondering if it could be mixed with Poly-Wipe-On. I’m going to experiment with it. Have you ever tried it?

-- James E McIntyre

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

10487 posts in 2074 days


#10 posted 12-28-2021 09:58 PM

I haven’t tried mixing it with anything other than mineral spirits so far. Well, and mixing it with shellac in a rag when applying it to a turned piece as a friction finish. That cures faster, but I still will leave the piece on the lathe overnight and then come back a day or two laterto add a second coat.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1935 posts in 2784 days


#11 posted 12-28-2021 10:07 PM



I haven’t tried mixing it with anything other than mineral spirits so far. Well, and mixing it with shellac in a rag when applying it to a turned piece as a friction finish. That cures faster, but I still will leave the piece on the lathe overnight and then come back a day or two laterto add a second coat.

- Dave Polaschek

Thanks again Dave. The finish from Tong Oil is so rich and warm it’s worth the wait if you have another project to work on while it drys.

It’s not good for professionals that have dead lines. Unless their true craftsman and the clients will wait.

-- James E McIntyre

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

7118 posts in 2714 days


#12 posted 12-29-2021 12:41 AM

Now you are cooking James!

The idea is one of those that is so obvious and useful, surprised I’ve never seen/heard of it before 8^)

You are a revolutionary my friend!

I know that RE magnets are sensitive to fairly low heat (demagnetizes them). They start to lose strength above 175F but if kept below 212F, the strength returns. Above 212 and the damage is permanent.

I can’t imagine anything boiling being served on the table so should be plenty safe. I doubt a pot of hearty green chile stew would have any effect, though it may make you feel like it will 8^)

View tynewman's profile

tynewman

240 posts in 1204 days


#13 posted 12-29-2021 12:53 AM

Love the idea, ill probably steal it

-- Ty

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1935 posts in 2784 days


#14 posted 12-29-2021 05:44 PM



Now you are cooking James!

The idea is one of those that is so obvious and useful, surprised I ve never seen/heard of it before 8^)

You are a revolutionary my friend!

I know that RE magnets are sensitive to fairly low heat (demagnetizes them). They start to lose strength above 175F but if kept below 212F, the strength returns. Above 212 and the damage is permanent.

I can t imagine anything boiling being served on the table so should be plenty safe. I doubt a pot of hearty green chile stew would have any effect, though it may make you feel like it will 8^)

- splintergroup

Thanks for the heads up Splinter. I now remember that forgers use magnets to check if the steel is ready for quenching.

-- James E McIntyre

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1935 posts in 2784 days


#15 posted 12-29-2021 05:50 PM


Now you are cooking James!

The idea is one of those that is so obvious and useful, surprised I ve never seen/heard of it before 8^)

You are a revolutionary my friend!

I know that RE magnets are sensitive to fairly low heat (demagnetizes them). They start to lose strength above 175F but if kept below 212F, the strength returns. Above 212 and the damage is permanent.

I can t imagine anything boiling being served on the table so should be plenty safe. I doubt a pot of hearty green chile stew would have any effect, though it may make you feel like it will 8^)

- splintergroup

Thanks Splinter. I know that forger’s use magnets to test when the steel is ready for a quench.

I found this on line.

-- James E McIntyre

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