LumberJocks

Celtic Knots - How To

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Project by adot45 posted 08-12-2021 03:15 PM 970 views 5 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I can only use 6 pictures to try and illustrate the steps in making these so you may have to read between the lines and make some assumptions. So:
Start with as square of a blank as you can and number the sides 1 2 3 4. I usually do these on my table saw but thought I would try one with a miter saw, seemed to work ok. Depending on the length of your blank and the desired placement of the knots—set a stop to the left of the blade and (I) set my blade to 30 you can use less of an angle or more of an angle to make the knots skinny or wide. 30 is just my personal preference and I think it makes an attractive sized knot-YMMV What you are going to do is make a cut and glue an inlay in and put the blank back together. Start with “1” facing up and make your first cut- see picture 2 wait an appropriate amount of time and make second cut with side “3” facing up, glue another inlay in and clamp it up, now you should have an “X” see picture 3. When enough time has allowed your second glueup to set, unclamp your blank and put side “2” facing up and repeat the cut and inlay glueup – see picture 4 After that has set turn the blank to side “4” and do the dance one more time. Your blank should look like this now-see picture 5. Let the glue cure (I let it go overnight) and you are ready to turn it. See turned blank, I glued ends on so I could drill them out for salt and pepper shakers. I hope this has made the process a little more clear and not added to the confusion…
Regards, Dave

-- “Often wrong but never in doubt”. Dave in WV.





21 comments so far

View Eric's profile

Eric

1905 posts in 1112 days


#1 posted 08-12-2021 03:58 PM

Thanks for the explanation, it does seems like a long setup, but the results are impressive for turnings.

-- Eric, building the dream

View rtbrmb's profile

rtbrmb

818 posts in 3627 days


#2 posted 08-12-2021 04:13 PM

Thanks for taking the time to detail the process. I really want to try a celtic knot project this winter.

Thanks for posting.

Bill in MI

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

3437 posts in 4766 days


#3 posted 08-12-2021 04:19 PM

Thanks for posting this tutorial.

If you want to add more photos, you can put them in with the text.

-- "Join the chorus if you can. It'll make of you an honest man." - I. Anderson

View adot45's profile

adot45

387 posts in 1863 days


#4 posted 08-12-2021 04:21 PM

Yes Eric, it is kind of fiddly, and the wait times between glueups makes it kind of an ordeal….(doing more than one at a time helps). But after you get your blank finished and start to turn it and you see the knot developing, I guarantee it will bring a smile to your face.

-- “Often wrong but never in doubt”. Dave in WV.

View adot45's profile

adot45

387 posts in 1863 days


#5 posted 08-12-2021 04:21 PM

Thanks Chuck, I wasn’t aware of that, good tip.

-- “Often wrong but never in doubt”. Dave in WV.

View northwoodsman's profile

northwoodsman

671 posts in 4985 days


#6 posted 08-12-2021 04:42 PM

Best explanation I’ve seen yet! Thanks for posting.

-- NorthWoodsMan

View adot45's profile

adot45

387 posts in 1863 days


#7 posted 08-12-2021 04:57 PM



Best explanation I ve seen yet! Thanks for posting.

- northwoodsman

Thank you very much northwoodsman, I appreciate it,

-- “Often wrong but never in doubt”. Dave in WV.

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

5845 posts in 2861 days


#8 posted 08-12-2021 06:26 PM

Nice, I’m pretty sure I’ll try it. I have VERY little experience on a lathe but I have a LOT of time

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

3993 posts in 3189 days


#9 posted 08-12-2021 07:40 PM

Thanks for the detail, and it looks good

-- Petey

View ClaudeF's profile

ClaudeF

1380 posts in 2946 days


#10 posted 08-12-2021 09:25 PM

Looks great! Have you tried one yet with sides 1 and 3 having the white insert, and sides 2 and 4 having the dark one?

Claude

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

View 987Ron's profile

987Ron

2162 posts in 555 days


#11 posted 08-12-2021 09:51 PM

Thanks for posting the how to. Nice work.

-- Ron

View adot45's profile

adot45

387 posts in 1863 days


#12 posted 08-12-2021 10:10 PM


Looks great! Have you tried one yet with sides 1 and 3 having the white insert, and sides 2 and 4 having the dark one?

Claude

- ClaudeF

Thanks! I’ve thought about doing that for a decorative effect on something like a mallet handle…..I kept these all one color because they are for salt and pepper shakers.

Thank you Ron

-- “Often wrong but never in doubt”. Dave in WV.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

8828 posts in 1813 days


#13 posted 08-12-2021 10:33 PM

Great instruction, you’ve made it easy to follow. Just not sure what to do without a lathe? Nope not another slippery slope. :-)

It actually seems like the woodworking part is quick and easy, all the time is waiting for glue to dry.

-- Think safe, be safe

View adot45's profile

adot45

387 posts in 1863 days


#14 posted 08-12-2021 10:46 PM



Great instruction, you ve made it easy to follow. Just not sure what to do without a lathe? Nope not another slippery slope. :-)

It actually seems like the woodworking part is quick and easy, all the time is waiting for glue to dry.

- therealSteveN

Thank you Steve. You are correct in thinking this is quick and easy, it is. Each knot is just four cuts on a chop saw. Doing multiple glue ups helps the time go by quicker. Waiting between glueups IS the hard part.
Keep your eye out for a used lathe, a midi or even a mini will provide a lot of enjoyment.

-- “Often wrong but never in doubt”. Dave in WV.

View MrWolfe's profile

MrWolfe

1669 posts in 1362 days


#15 posted 08-13-2021 02:18 AM

Thanks for sharing!

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