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3D Endgrain cutting board

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Project by Sawdust2012 posted 07-13-2021 10:47 AM 1343 views 0 times favorited 32 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is from one of those 3D plans from MTM. It’s Walnut, Cherry, and Maple. This was a huge (for me) undertaking. I’d really like to hear lessons learned from experience about how to prevent misalignment in the glue up. There are so many strips that it seems impossible to keep them from slipping out of alignment. Also, I ended up pretty badly out of square, which is disguised by the optical illusion. I see it however! If anyone knows the etiology of that problem, I’m listening. It could be my saw, or it could be something I’ve done in the glue up. Any advice?

I doubt that I’ll review the SuperMax 19/38 drum sander I bought to complete this and other cutting boards, but it is indispensable. If you make end grain boards and don’t have a drum sander, the first time you run one through it will just about bring you to tears.





32 comments so far

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

5421 posts in 3277 days


#1 posted 07-13-2021 10:58 AM

I like the illusion.

View Sawdust2012's profile

Sawdust2012

298 posts in 3001 days


#2 posted 07-13-2021 11:05 AM



I like the illusion.

- Redoak49


Thanks! That’s what drew me…well, my wife, to it.

View ohwoodeye's profile

ohwoodeye

2710 posts in 4442 days


#3 posted 07-13-2021 12:22 PM

I think that you thinking you are out of square is strictly an illusion. :) I don’t see it.
Looks like it weighs 100 pounds.
Nice job.

-- "Fine Woodworking" is the name given to a project that takes 3 times longer than normal to finish because you used hand tools instead of power tools. ----Mike, Waukesha, WI

View 987Ron's profile

987Ron

2458 posts in 605 days


#4 posted 07-13-2021 12:26 PM

nice work. Don’t be over critical of ones own work.

-- Ron

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

5975 posts in 2910 days


#5 posted 07-13-2021 12:33 PM

beautiful example of planning and perseverance
You are absolutely correct about your drum sander, I resisted for years and finally got a 16/32 one of the best investments yet

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

9105 posts in 3865 days


#6 posted 07-13-2021 12:59 PM

Fascinating thanks for posting!

View Sawdust2012's profile

Sawdust2012

298 posts in 3001 days


#7 posted 07-13-2021 05:29 PM



I think that you thinking you are out of square is strictly an illusion. :) I don t see it.
Looks like it weighs 100 pounds.
Nice job.

- ohwoodeye

Thanks! It is very heavy. I’m betting 25 lbs

View Sawdust2012's profile

Sawdust2012

298 posts in 3001 days


#8 posted 07-13-2021 05:30 PM



nice work. Don t be over critical of ones own work.

- 987Ron

Thanks a lot! I am pretty critical, but I know where all the mistakes are!

View Sawdust2012's profile

Sawdust2012

298 posts in 3001 days


#9 posted 07-13-2021 05:31 PM



beautiful example of planning and perseverance
You are absolutely correct about your drum sander, I resisted for years and finally got a 16/32 one of the best investments yet

- recycle1943


Thanks! It was weeks in the making. Would have been months without the drum sander.

View awsum55's profile

awsum55

1196 posts in 1797 days


#10 posted 07-13-2021 05:51 PM

WOW! That is an incredible undertaking, and it looks fantastic. I don’t think I could ever pull that off. Did you ever count the pieces?

-- John D, OP, KS

View Sawdust2012's profile

Sawdust2012

298 posts in 3001 days


#11 posted 07-13-2021 06:10 PM



WOW! That is an incredible undertaking, and it looks fantastic. I don t think I could ever pull that off. Did you ever count the pieces?

- awsum55


There’s over 1100 segments, but it’s all done by gluing up 4 boards of 33 strips of prescribed width and wood type. Then those are crosscut into prescribed width and arranged based on from which original board they came. THEN, those are cut, and arranged on end grain, again according to a prescribed plan concocted by either a genius or mental patient. The guy who sells the plans is from Russia, and sells several plans for 3D boards. I get a little skittish sending my debit card info to Russia, but so far I haven’t been cleaned out, and I can still fly on an airplane.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gliOZyHkdps

Here’s a link to one of his videos. I’m not trying to promote the guy’s stuff, but if it can get me to making this cutting board, it must be of some value.

View Mike_190930's profile

Mike_190930

55 posts in 796 days


#12 posted 07-13-2021 08:21 PM

Great piece of work !

This may not have been concocted by a mental patient, but could make one out of you by the end :).

As for square, lord there are so many ways to fall off that trolley (I did watch the video). All I can add is check each step for absolutely uniform thickness in each board, down to the thousandth. Or compensate by alternating ends where possible to get a uniform stack thickness. An error of even a couple of thousandths on each strip could potentially add up to 0.050 over or under on one end. Also, if I were to do this (unlikely since I want to maintain my admittedly current shaky level of sanity), I would measure across each stacked glue up and adjust the clamping pressure a little until the width is uniform across the stack. Glue squeeze out differences in the thousandths range can also throw it off kilter.

Drum sanders are priceless when working end grain.

-- Huh? Whadaya mean it ain't "measure once cut twice"?

View Sawdust2012's profile

Sawdust2012

298 posts in 3001 days


#13 posted 07-13-2021 08:37 PM



Great piece of work !

This may not have been concocted by a mental patient, but could make one out of you by the end :).

As for square, lord there are so many ways to fall off that trolley (I did watch the video). All I can add is check each step for absolutely uniform thickness in each board, down to the thousandth. Or compensate by alternating ends where possible to get a uniform stack thickness. An error of even a couple of thousandths on each strip could potentially add up to 0.050 over or under on one end. Also, if I were to do this (unlikely since I want to maintain my admittedly current shaky level of sanity), I would measure across each stacked glue up and adjust the clamping pressure a little until the width is uniform across the stack. Glue squeeze out differences in the thousandths range can also throw it off kilter.

Drum sanders are priceless when working end grain.

- Mike_190930

Wow! That is great advice. I would never have thought to check the boards during glue up. There are 33 slats in both directions so that could have easily accounted for the bow on one side. The thinnest slats are 5 mm thick. That width a board would be easily influenced by clamping pressure.

View oldrivers's profile

oldrivers

2816 posts in 2855 days


#14 posted 07-13-2021 08:43 PM

Awesome build, great work congratulations.

-- Soli Deo gloria!

View Sawdust2012's profile

Sawdust2012

298 posts in 3001 days


#15 posted 07-13-2021 08:47 PM



Awesome build, great work congratulations.

- oldrivers


Thanks!

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