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Hickory End Table

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Project by MrBob54 posted 05-16-2021 12:32 AM 504 views 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is the first time I tried hickory for a project. I really like the look. It is a very open grain wood so I used Aqua Coat grain filler and it turned out very smooth to the touch. Also my first time using grain filler. The finish is shellac with water based poly over it to give the top durability, followed by paste wax.

-- “Each of us has to do his little bit toward transforming this spirit of the times.” Albert Einstein





6 comments so far

View BB1's profile

BB1

2211 posts in 1967 days


#1 posted 05-16-2021 02:08 AM

I love the look of hickory even if it can be a bit difficult to work with. Very nice table, with clean lines that let’s the beauty of the wood take the attention.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

5284 posts in 2342 days


#2 posted 05-16-2021 09:45 PM

Great form and construction!

I really like hickory, beautiful wood, but it takes dedication. Are you going to build more pieces?

View MrBob54's profile

MrBob54

16 posts in 1505 days


#3 posted 05-16-2021 10:55 PM



Great form and construction!

I really like hickory, beautiful wood, but it takes dedication. Are you going to build more pieces?

- splintergroup


I do like the color and grain, it is a very hard, tough wood though. I guess that is why they used to make wagon wheels out of it. I cut myself on a sharp edge in the process. Also router bits want to burn. But I am sure I will use it again sometime…must be glutton for punishment. I am trying new woods right now. I think I will try Beech next, what do you know about it?

-- “Each of us has to do his little bit toward transforming this spirit of the times.” Albert Einstein

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splintergroup

5284 posts in 2342 days


#4 posted 05-16-2021 11:43 PM

Beech is quite tool friendly, doesn’t want to splinter or explode from router bits like hickory does 8^)

Color and grain is rather bland but some boards have varying colors and neat grains. Quarter sawn wood also can have a nice figure. It tends to move around (expand/contract) a bit more than other woods

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MrBob54

16 posts in 1505 days


#5 posted 05-17-2021 12:52 AM



Beech is quite tool friendly, doesn t want to splinter or explode from router bits like hickory does 8^)

Color and grain is rather bland but some boards have varying colors and neat grains. Quarter sawn wood also can have a nice figure. It tends to move around (expand/contract) a bit more than other woods

- splintergroup


I read that you want to avoid having sap wood and heart wood on the same board due to difference in wood movement between the two. Have you found that to be true?

-- “Each of us has to do his little bit toward transforming this spirit of the times.” Albert Einstein

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

5284 posts in 2342 days


#6 posted 05-17-2021 02:17 PM

I haven’t noticed any issues like that, but using the contrast between sap and heart wood can be a neat design element. Walnut rules on that feature due to the contrast, beech, not so much since the heart wood is light colored.

If you design for wood movement, the problem tends to disappear.

Table tops held on with fasteners that allow for the top to expand/contract
Tenons that are only glued into mortises over a few inches of width in the center if the tenon board is fairly wide.
Frame and panel construction that allows the panel to “float” with expansion room (if the panel is solid wood).

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