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Traditional Routing planes

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Project by MikeB_UK posted 04-12-2021 09:28 AM 724 views 1 time favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

A pair of traditional router planes.
Made with hand tools only.

Lower angle (45 degree) one is made out of beech.
Blog of the build with pictures here.

Normal angle one is made out of spalted birch.
Blog of the build with pictures here.

Pics
1. Both Router planes.
2. Beech used
3. Beech router plane.
4. Birch used
4. Spalted birch router plane

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.





12 comments so far

View Eric's profile

Eric

1366 posts in 955 days


#1 posted 04-12-2021 11:03 AM

Nicely done.

-- Eric, building the dream

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

7455 posts in 1664 days


#2 posted 04-12-2021 11:41 AM

Nice, Mike! Sorry we couldn’t find someone from your side of the pond for the plane swap.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

396 posts in 2116 days


#3 posted 04-12-2021 12:18 PM

Eric – Cheers.

Dave, cheers mate, no worries, the plough plane idea will probably go horribly wrong anyway :)

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

5123 posts in 2304 days


#4 posted 04-12-2021 02:42 PM

A lot of work but the results are first rate.
Excellent!

View Tom's profile

Tom

269 posts in 973 days


#5 posted 04-12-2021 03:01 PM

Nice planes. Thanks for the blog and photos. Well done. :)

-- Tom

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

396 posts in 2116 days


#6 posted 04-12-2021 07:22 PM

Cheers Splinter, most of it went fairly well.
Biggest takeaway for me from this is work out the angles for the bed/wedge before cutting the hole, getting that dialled in right on the beech one took a while.

Cheers tom.

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View swirt's profile

swirt

6194 posts in 4054 days


#7 posted 04-13-2021 01:40 AM

Nice work.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

396 posts in 2116 days


#8 posted 04-13-2021 06:07 PM

Thanks swirt

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View mafe's profile

mafe

13188 posts in 4171 days


#9 posted 04-26-2021 09:19 AM

Nice planes.
Fine job and lovely spalted wood.
With the high angle I guess it’s more a scraper plane in a way… Our traditional types, have the cutter bend 90° and then sharpened to app 45° so, I were surprised to see a upright version like that. Do you have the bevel up or down on the blade then? If up, it will be almost a cabinet scraper.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View MikeB_UK's profile

MikeB_UK

396 posts in 2116 days


#10 posted 04-26-2021 10:34 AM

Hi Mads

Thanks, Bevel down

The old high angle ones do work a lot more like a scraper, that’s why I did the 45 degree one as well.
The main reason for making these over the bent cutter version was that I already had the plough plane blades so can go from 1/8th to 1/2 inch.
I’ll probably make one of the bent cutter ones as well at some point, they do have advantages on occasion :)

Around here all the old router planes were user made and used plough plane blades (or chisels), I thought the bent cutters were introduced with the metal bodied ones, but if they are traditional over there it must date back further than that.

-- Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

View mafe's profile

mafe

13188 posts in 4171 days


#11 posted 04-26-2021 03:11 PM

Hi Mike,
It all makes sense.

I don’t know the history of router planes, but the type we traditionally used in Europe is this, but I can imagine both types has been there at the same time:
https://www.omnia.ie/index.php?navigation_function=2&navigation_item=%2F440%2Fitem_PYKDLQGMBEVFUEYYY3WKMMHNIWMCWSWS&repid=1
This is the type I grew up with here:
https://www.tischlereicenter.eu/werkzeug/hobel/ulmia-grundhobel.html
Where they have made a wingnut tightener, to make adjustment easy I suppose, it was like wedges grew out of fashion at some point.

Here the parts:
http://www.woodworking.de/cgi-bin/forum/webbbs_config.pl/md/read/id/28757/sbj/grundhobel-eigenbau/

So we can see they date back to before 1777 at least in this small research.

I will personally guess, that they were originally just a block of wood that could hold your chisel in a steady height.

Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

View mafe's profile

mafe

13188 posts in 4171 days


#12 posted 04-26-2021 03:12 PM

Hmmmm perhaps I ned to fire up the forge and make a blade, for a traditional bend version with wedge, just for the fun of it. Smiles.

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect.

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