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Miter Saw / Planer Station

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Project by Ken Van Der Griend posted 04-03-2021 11:52 AM 1131 views 8 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I designed and built this miter saw / planer station which has really saved me a lot of space and has proven to be very functional. I modified the design for the miter saw fences from a Fine Woodworking magazine article – # 209 – Tools & Shops 2010. The fences can slide to the side providing additional support when needed. The height of the arms is higher than my benches and, along with the t-tracks, provides an excellent work surface for up-close work, routing mortices or to mount my dovetail jig. The arms are supported with folding-shelf brackets that can support 500 pounds per pair. I mounted two Kreg Precession Track & Stop systems on the fences which works great. The fences start about 15” from the blade on both sides. For shorter cuts I use a 1×1 x 20” hardwood stick and add 20” to the measurement. I mounted the first 14” cut-off from the Kreg-supplied measuring tapes to the front of the fence as a quick guide.
I couldn’t pass up the opportunity for drawer storage in the arms. However, I wanted to be able to access the stuff in the drawers even when the arms were down. So, I came up with the “J-shaped” drawer. In the horizontal position it has one side left off and half of a top. Of course, I had to limit the types of things I could store in them – i.e. nothing that would become disorganized or come rolling out by changing the arm orientation. So I store things like sanding disks, sanding blocks, roles of PSA sand paper and router parts and jigs I use with my dovetail jig. In the other two drawers I store paint brushes, painter’s points, tack clothes, etc. These two are normal drawers with a sliding lid. When the arms are in the vertical position, I pull the entire box out of the arm holding onto the lid tightly and then set it down horizontally before accessing the contents. I turned the drawer fronts out of 5/4 stock so I wouldn’t have hardware pulls in the way.
Having the planer slide out from under the saw means I no longer have to move that 90+ pounds off of a shelf and onto a bench. I put its shelf on drawer slides and put two legs under the front just so it wouldn’t tip over. I just slide it out, drop the tables, attach the dust port to the planer and a dust collection bag and plan away.
I was also able to tuck my compressor under the planner out of the way.

-- Measure twice. Buy once - Ken Van Der Griend - Oak Park Illonois - USA





16 comments so far

View Eric's profile

Eric

1501 posts in 987 days


#1 posted 04-03-2021 12:33 PM

Nice idea, and compact. So no support for the out feed wings? The drawers are a great idea. As for the planner, it looks like it would be set to low for use. I have seen designs where the shelf would slide out and swing up to a working height. Just saying.

Overall, great job.

-- Eric, building the dream

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1934 days


#2 posted 04-03-2021 01:06 PM

Cool design ’VDG... Like the idea of drawers “under” the wings and the design of both vertical and horizontal functionality.
Would appreciate more specs on those wing supports as I’d expect some weight behind it… are they heavy-duty-beefy, or do you need to compensate for any sag? That D4R with timber and router would make me seem like a lightweight.

Do agree with Eric that the thicknesser seems a tad low to me… however, if your back can take it I can just envy (your back).

If I had to comment adversely, I’d question your choice of wheels (size)... The way you’ve mounted them (+1), could afford larger ones without affecting the centre of gravity. In all my experience cracks in concrete never decrease but grow… and you seem to be nurturing some annoying growth.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Ken Van Der Griend's profile

Ken Van Der Griend

12 posts in 1784 days


#3 posted 04-03-2021 01:23 PM

Good morning guys. Thanks for the comments. The planner bed is above my knees – 26” off the floor if memory serves – and works well for me. The folding-shelf supports hold 500 lbs. per pair (according to the manufacturer). The wings do deflect a bit – about 1/2” at the ends – which doesn’t really impact cutting but it does makes me uncomfortable so I do support them. The left wing normally hoovers over my router table so I just put a couple of shims under it. I have just a 1×2 stick under the right wing to the floor. These are just to take the stress off of the folding-support hardware.

LBD – your right about my floor cracks. The side walls (cinder block & face bricks) cracked the floor and the walls tip out a bit. But the cracks don’t come into play in the middle of the back wall where the station lives. The normal use case, I move the station 3 feet out to raise or lower an arm and then 3 feet back. Expecting that, I used double locking casters in the front. My regret is using straight casters in the back. It was quite a feet moving the station to the other side of the shop for some of the shots. I’m glad I passed 3-point turns in drivers ed.

-- Measure twice. Buy once - Ken Van Der Griend - Oak Park Illonois - USA

View Eric's profile

Eric

1501 posts in 987 days


#4 posted 04-03-2021 01:37 PM

I think I would support those wings just the same, and not rely on the hardware. Also gives you better support for the cross cuts on the longer lumber, without it lifting up after the cut through. Just saying.

-- Eric, building the dream

View Bobsboxes's profile

Bobsboxes

1670 posts in 3778 days


#5 posted 04-03-2021 01:57 PM

Looks very handy, I like the drawers for storage. I used my planer on a low shelf for several years, like you have. Great build.

-- Bob in Montana. Kindness is the Language the blind can see and deaf can hear. - Mark Twain

View 987Ron's profile

987Ron

1357 posts in 430 days


#6 posted 04-03-2021 02:20 PM

Nice way to save some space. The wings with the storage is great. Thanks for posting

-- Ron

View Sark's profile

Sark

413 posts in 1474 days


#7 posted 04-03-2021 02:22 PM

Yes, great built, thanks for posting. Always looking for ways to cram more stuff into the same space…and I like having those fold-up drawers loaded with light weight disks.

View Brodan's profile

Brodan

314 posts in 2416 days


#8 posted 04-03-2021 02:50 PM

Nice build. Great idea for saving space. With my small space, I’m always looking for ways save space.

Thanks for posting

-- Dan, TN

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2831 posts in 1702 days


#9 posted 04-03-2021 02:54 PM

Excellent work.

I agree with Eric that the planer is too low. No feed supports mean it’ll snipe like hell and an 8’ 2×8 will break your back.

For the least amount of lifting all your work surfaces should be the same height. This allows you to use each tool as a support for the others. That left wing covering the router isn’t needed for support if the tops were even.

The folding arms are clever, but they don’t really save much since they cover your router table. I wonder how long you’ll pull the planer and compressor out, pull the stand out, raise the arms, make a cut, fold the arms, push it back, push the planer and compressor back and then rout an edge.

I hate long miter saw infeeds because its so much easier to position it next to a door. Think about it. How often are you cutting 8’ mouldings? Like never. So 8’ either side of a chop saw is a waste 99.9% of the time.

This is why miter saws are used on job sites — they’re portable! Got a couple of l-o-n-g boards? roll/carry it into the driveway and cut it there. Same-same for planer too. Keep it next to the doors for easy rollout for long boards. I can still use it for short stuff in situ.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

9539 posts in 3523 days


#10 posted 04-03-2021 04:54 PM

Looks like a nice unit. Creative design with the drawers.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7111 posts in 2501 days


#11 posted 04-04-2021 12:42 AM

Nice. Makes me rethink my plan for a flip top stand. I would prefer to have the planer higher while in use but I also don’t the idea of moving around 2 tools to use one of them. I might have to explore some sort of scissor lift mechanism to raise the planer up to a more comfortable level for use.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1827 posts in 841 days


#12 posted 04-04-2021 01:08 AM


Excellent work.

I agree with Eric that the planer is too low. No feed supports mean it ll snipe like hell and an 8 2×8 will break your back.

For the least amount of lifting all your work surfaces should be the same height. This allows you to use each tool as a support for the others. That left wing covering the router isn t needed for support if the tops were even.

The folding arms are clever, but they don t really save much since they cover your router table. I wonder how long you ll pull the planer and compressor out, pull the stand out, raise the arms, make a cut, fold the arms, push it back, push the planer and compressor back and then rout an edge.

I hate long miter saw infeeds because its so much easier to position it next to a door. Think about it. How often are you cutting 8 mouldings? Like never. So 8 either side of a chop saw is a waste 99.9% of the time.

This is why miter saws are used on job sites — they re portable! Got a couple of l-o-n-g boards? roll/carry it into the driveway and cut it there. Same-same for planer too. Keep it next to the doors for easy rollout for long boards. I can still use it for short stuff in situ.

- Madmark2


I disagree with all of this, except the excellent work part.

While the planer may be low, if you’re only doing short boards, it’s no big deal.
(so just depends how much of what you’re doing.)
The whole thing is portable on wheels so nothing is “blocking” the router table.
And I am always cutting boards (doesn’t have to be just molding) that are 8’ or longer.
The extra storage in the wings is just a bonus…
Nice work!

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3864 posts in 4551 days


#13 posted 04-04-2021 01:32 AM

We’ve seen a lot of miter stations here and various multi carts but I think this is a first with the drawers in the wings and such. A fairly intricate build. I think we might all be a bit impressed with the design.

I have the DW 734 planer. It has the outfeed tables. I find that even with an 8 ft bd going through it, If I just give it a bit of support when it’s long on the outfeed end, no snipe. In fact I really have never seen snipe in my planer unless I lift the wood by accident at the end.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

5480 posts in 2736 days


#14 posted 04-04-2021 10:51 AM

Well, I agree with some of the advise, disagree with some and most importantly have to say, I like the concept, love the drawer system and Ken – if it works for you that’s all that matters. Great build !

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

18028 posts in 4302 days


#15 posted 04-09-2021 01:48 PM

Very well done, Love the space saving. I use to have to do these kind of things in my old shop. Love it.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

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