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Japanese inspired cherry bench stool

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Project by grovemadman posted 02-13-2021 12:57 AM 920 views 2 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Made of Cherry and mostly with hand tools this stool features splayed legs in two directions. The legs are also tapered with a hand plane and are angled mortise and tenon in two directions. The top(as is all parts) are made of 8/4 cherry with some fairly wild grain. As I mentioned it is made mostly with hand tools with the exception of ripping the leg and stretcher stock down. The concave top and stringer were made using a scrub plane and then cleaning it up with a spoke shave, card scraper and double strength glass as a scraper. Everything was hand burnished with plane shavings and then finished with boiled linseed oil and some wax. I figure about 100 hours went into making this and I did it without a proper work bench which was a tedious feat at best. There are a few flaws, but I’m not telling!

-- "It is the job of the woodworker to hide his mistakes and keep a tight set of lips about them!"--Chuck





17 comments so far

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

8825 posts in 3465 days


#1 posted 02-13-2021 01:53 AM

Beautiful.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View pottz's profile

pottz

16236 posts in 2041 days


#2 posted 02-13-2021 01:54 AM

i truly believe in the beauty of simplicity and youve done that here,but i just cant afford to spend 100 hours on something like this,so id have to go power tool and knock it out in about 8! i appreciate you hand tool guys but life is just too short-lol. it’s a beautiful stool ,period!

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View grovemadman's profile

grovemadman

960 posts in 4828 days


#3 posted 02-13-2021 02:34 AM

Thanks Pottz! I don’t like sawdust, which is why I am transitioning to hand tool work mostly. I did not use any sand paper on this project and I wish you could feel it. I do see a place for power tools, I use them everyday to make a living. That being said, I think every woodworker could use some solid hand tool skills to improve the overall quality of their work. Using proper hand tool layout skills(I.E. face and edge reference markings etc.. helps produce more accurate work I believe. I am glad you like the stool and I have more work coming soon. Us hand tool guys aren’t so bad! hahaha Keep an eye out for my heart shaped purpleheart box for my Mother’s ashes.

-- "It is the job of the woodworker to hide his mistakes and keep a tight set of lips about them!"--Chuck

View pottz's profile

pottz

16236 posts in 2041 days


#4 posted 02-13-2021 02:40 AM



Thanks Pottz! I don t like sawdust, which is why I am transitioning to hand tool work mostly. I did not use any sand paper on this project and I wish you could feel it. I do see a place for power tools, I use them everyday to make a living. That being said, I think every woodworker could use some solid hand tool skills to improve the overall quality of their work. Using proper hand tool layout skills(I.E. face and edge reference markings etc.. helps produce more accurate work I believe. I am glad you like the stool and I have more work coming soon. Us hand tool guys aren t so bad! hahaha Keep an eye out for my heart shaped purpleheart box for my Mother s ashes.

- grovemadman


i hear ya,actually id say im a hybrid woodworker,one that uses power tools but incorporates hand tools.ive gotten into the maloof style of furniture and that requires a lot of hand tool work.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View grovemadman's profile

grovemadman

960 posts in 4828 days


#5 posted 02-13-2021 02:46 AM

Thanks Butcher!

-- "It is the job of the woodworker to hide his mistakes and keep a tight set of lips about them!"--Chuck

View Phil Stallings's profile

Phil Stallings

35 posts in 257 days


#6 posted 02-13-2021 11:17 AM

Nice Job

-- Phil Stallings, NC

View Eric's profile

Eric

1243 posts in 929 days


#7 posted 02-13-2021 11:32 AM

Very nice piece, and impressive with hand tools.

-- Eric, building the dream

View Eeyore's profile

Eeyore

106 posts in 272 days


#8 posted 02-13-2021 02:31 PM

Even in medieval Japan, you would have had some (ahem) mechanical help with serious sawing tasks.

-- Elliott C. "Eeyore" Evans

View Andre's profile

Andre

4460 posts in 2862 days


#9 posted 02-13-2021 03:55 PM

Very Nice, As Krenov said, not Flaws, Finger prints!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View grovemadman's profile

grovemadman

960 posts in 4828 days


#10 posted 02-13-2021 04:00 PM

Part of the reason it took so long Pottz is I had to make do without a proper bench. I’m solving that problem right now as we speak. Keep an eye out for my Moravian workbench coming soon to LJ’s!

-- "It is the job of the woodworker to hide his mistakes and keep a tight set of lips about them!"--Chuck

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1197 posts in 2348 days


#11 posted 02-13-2021 08:51 PM

Splayed legs aren’t easy. You did a great job. Love the Japanese style.

When I’m finished with our house I’m going to attempt some stools with splayed and raked legs.
What technique did you use?

-- James E McIntyre

View grovemadman's profile

grovemadman

960 posts in 4828 days


#12 posted 02-14-2021 12:57 AM

I used a hand plane to taper the legs. The angled cuts were done with a tenon saw. When your ready James let me know And I will bring it over so you can see it.

-- "It is the job of the woodworker to hide his mistakes and keep a tight set of lips about them!"--Chuck

View John's profile

John

2045 posts in 2326 days


#13 posted 02-14-2021 07:26 PM

You sure did a nice job, looks awesome! I haven’t done a project like this but I was planning on it soon. More of a rustic style, not nice wood like yours. Did you glue it together? Is there enough play in the fit to allow assembly or is it hard to get the pieces to go together? Last question, I don’t see a pin in the end of the crossmember, is there one?

-- John, Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada.

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1197 posts in 2348 days


#14 posted 02-14-2021 07:39 PM



Even in medieval Japan, you would have had some (ahem) mechanical help with serious sawing tasks.

- Eeyore

Funny watercolor Eeyore. Which one are you top or bottom? (:-)

-- James E McIntyre

View grovemadman's profile

grovemadman

960 posts in 4828 days


#15 posted 02-15-2021 05:03 AM

John, It is glued together and the joinery is as tight as I could get it. I used a mallet to bring the joints home, but not so tight that they would split the wood. The glue up is very complicated because there are so many joints and they must all come together at once. I used Tightbond II for it’s longer open working time, but I would have used a glue with more open working time if I thought I couldn’t get it together before the glue started to set up. The stringer has no pins yet, I could always add one later if needed.
I would recommend buying some nice straight grained wood to work with, something like spruce which is a strong wood for it’s density. Brush up on your math skills if you want to copy this because every joint is an angled joint and the leg mortises are compound angles as well as the leg bottoms. The stool you see here is very heavy for what it is. If you don’t feel comfortable with through angled mortise and tenon joints you could consider making the seat and undercarriage separate. You could use an apron between the tops of the legs and then use mechanical fasteners to mount the top from underneath, For aesthetics I would definitely use solid 8/4 lumber to make the seat, a glue lamination would work, but it won’t look as good. Take your time, post your project here and Good luck with your project.

-- "It is the job of the woodworker to hide his mistakes and keep a tight set of lips about them!"--Chuck

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