LumberJocks

Geometric wood stuffing (surrounded by metals), Small mitre

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Project by Bertha posted 02-09-2021 03:40 PM 981 views 1 time favorited 25 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have a bit of a man-crush on Bill Carter. I’m no Bill Carter but I gave it a whirl. I wanted to make a project out of wood, with some metal, that resembled a traditional woodworking mitre plane. After some debate, I went with a square back instead of round, mostly for the challenge. I’d go round if I had it to do over again.

I’ll start with the metal parts, but this is ultimately a project made of wood, for wood.

I chose 1/8 inch brass stock, 3/16 inch 01 steel, and E-bay ‘damascus’ (more later).

I sandwiched the brass sides together with carpet tape.

I marked out the sides as one does and started cutting the dovetails. I’m a Spiers guy, but I went a very weird direction with the sole at the mouth. I wanted to see, for future reference, how hard it would be to extend the iron to make a rebate plane. Since I’m learning, I wanted a window to view the iron and sole/’frog’ junction. It’s stable and I don’t get any clogging at the intentional/inadvertent ‘ejection’ ports. Anyhow, it’s weird, I know it, and that’s that.

I went ahead and ran the bridge now b/c I knew I’d lose the alignment if I didn’t.

I made a little wooden jig (made of wood) and shimmed it with veneer until I got some good perpendicularity (real word?). There’s no way I could have done this without the jig. I’m simply not that good cutting metal.

Transferred to the sole and cut the 01 which was an absolute nightmare. I knew tool steel probably wasn’t necessary and 3/16 inch definitely wasn’t.

Again, I used my jig for all this. I neglected to mention that I oversized the dovetails by 1/16 inch for later peening. I know some like to cut the dovetails with a slight void for the peening to fill, but that was a bit ambitious for me at my current skill level.

Like I said, cutting the 01 really sucked.

OK, so this project is all angles and it’s unforgiving. I want the iron bedded at 18 degrees, bevel up. If I had it to do over again, I’d shape the infill prior to enclosing the case, but that ship has sailed. I want the sole also at 18 degrees behind the mouth. I’m coming up on a disadvantage of using 3/16 inch for the sole

I’m to the point now to start addressing the mouth. Given that I wan’t the iron:sole junction exposed (explained earlier), and I chose 3/16 inch for the sole, I can only get the mouth so tight. I brought the sole angle, I’ll just call it a frog for simplicity, as thin as I could, but I don’t want the rear of the mouth too fragile. I also don’t want much of the iron unsupported b/w the frog and the infill.

I’d like to give a little ramp ahead of the mouth, continuous with the dovetail angle, to aid in chip ejection. This was a little difficult to maintain squareness at the mouth and will have to be corrected later.

Transferred and cut the dovetails on the anterior sole plate. The mouth isn’t great folks. It will have to be squared up later, but it probably required opening it by 1/32 inch or less, which is very valuable real estate on a mitre.

I got me some ‘damascus’ off ebay and I don’t know what it really is, but it’s outrageously hard. It laughed at everything but diamonds. I don’t know how many layers constitutes ‘damascus’ but I’m guessing it’s more than 3 lolol. Look closely at the primary bevel.

So I don’t know what it is, but it’s hard hard hard. Harder than Scotty B at a Nickelback set. Here’s just a few shots of me fumbling with the mouth.


It looks like there’s no avoiding a short span b/w the sole/frog and the infill where the iron won’t be supported. I don’t think it’s a big deal b/c it’s set back and the sole/frog is so thick (3/16 at 18 degrees). I could have tapered the infill all the way to the edge but it was going to be hard to drop in the infill b/c I had already sealed up the case in real life. I would have left the back off and trimmed the infill to fit, should I have thought of it.

I was going to use a really nice piece of burl from this company I love. I backed out b/c I don’t know, I like the contrast b/w dark infill and brass. No other reason, really.

I won’t go a lot into this but I cut the front and back plates. I tapped them and secured them with a stainless hex bolt, which I’ll later file down and cut a straight slot into. No other reason than I like the traditional look and I will be using the rear button for setting.

The jig came in handy for transferring the dovetails and I simply had to trim the ends to accommodate the assembled case. Really helped me with alignment.

I have the case now, so I’ll turn my attention to the infills. I should have addressed the infills before I closed the case.

“Rosewood”, not rosewood. Looks like Paduak but doesn’t really cut like it. Anyhow, I think it’s pretty.




Now onto peening and I peened the Biden out of this thing. This may be out of sequence. I was way too aggressive and my oversized dovetails, tabs, whatever you like to call them, were no match for the pounding. Looking back, I like the character in the final product, but I should have given myself more metal to work with and I should have dialed it down a bit. I followed it up with a few passes on a scary sharp plate.

I debated long and hard whether to use a lever cap or a wedge. Wanting to make life difficult, I went with a cap. I don’t care for the caps that screw into the sides, I’d rather have one that’s captured under the cross member. The one pictured is before a lot of fitting, so it got much thinner as I fitted it.


This just kind of happened. I tapped a brass rod and ended up using a stainless bed bolt that I happened to have lying around. I simply cut off the ‘woodscrew’ half of it. I cut it long, then trimmed it at the end of this saga.

Here’s where I marked it for trimming (in the future)

Here it is cut down to size


Here it is all dressed for prom. I considered brass-blacking it, then scuffing it up, but I figured I can always due that once it’s a little more beaten up. I also didn’t stamp it anywhere.



So it was….fun? It was a challenge for me, but I’m not in a real rush to do it again. I can tell you, though, whatever Bill Carter, and Marcou on the other technical extreme, charge for their planes, it’s not enough. If you know me, you know I take a ton of build pictures. If there’s anything you’d like to see, I probably have it. Since I haven’t said anything mean spirited yet, Covid is benign to the healthy, masks don’t work, and the naked rna vaccine codes for other stuff and will probably give you autoimmune disease. The Great Reset is real and communism is the goal. Climate changes, ask the middle ages or gobekli tepe. Thanks for looking!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog





25 comments so far

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13615 posts in 3747 days


#1 posted 02-09-2021 03:45 PM

Also, I really wanted to sneck the iron but that weird ebay damascus wouldn’t take a hit from the wire feeder lol

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

26062 posts in 4159 days


#2 posted 02-09-2021 04:06 PM

Man that is a great achievement with the tools you had to work the metal. I was looking at the process shots and thought you needed a milling machine but you came through great. That first shot looks like a dial indicator and I thought you did have a mill there! You have a plane to be real proud of!!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13615 posts in 3747 days


#3 posted 02-09-2021 04:12 PM

Ha! you caught the dial indicator! I wondered if a shrewd eye would catch it. It was a take on the “project made of wood” thing lol. Thanks for the kind comments. A blacksmith of mine said that you can’t instill ‘soul’ into a tool if you let a cnc do it. No offense to cnc owners (me included), but I think there’s some truth to that.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

3408 posts in 3830 days


#4 posted 02-09-2021 04:18 PM

Al -

That is a sweet little plane.

Damascus steel is 2+ layers of alternating steel. The layers are forge welded and can have different patterns based upon folding over, twisting, drilling, cuts, etc… then hardened.

The most amount of layers that I have heard about was something like 2000 different layers but that gets seriously crazy.

Nice work.

-- David in Palm Bay, FL

View Andre's profile

Andre

4455 posts in 2860 days


#5 posted 02-09-2021 04:43 PM

WAY too ambitious for me:) do need a Pic of some Shavings? An yup agree with your final statement.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

11043 posts in 3346 days


#6 posted 02-09-2021 04:50 PM

Definitely looks like a ton of work, and I have always been amazed at how little (my opinion) people like you mentioned sell them for (Including our very own TerryR when he was making them)

Also, that rant at the end LOL. I miss you hanging around the HPOYD thread ;-)

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13615 posts in 3747 days


#7 posted 02-09-2021 04:53 PM

Dave, thanks, bro. I guess my ebay damascus must really be damascus, just a lower order laminate lol. I’ll tell you what, though, I think I said ‘hard’ 10 times b/c it really is that hard. I’m going to buy a rockwell (sp?) scratching kit just to find out for sure.

Andre, you only have to do it once! My bad on the shavings. You will have them before the day’s end. It works as advertised but the mouth is wider than it should be. I haven’t fooled with it beyond standard smoother shavings and I haven’t plopped it on the shooting board yet. It’s literally hot off the press, having been ‘completed’ last night. They’re never really completed, after all. I owe you guys a lot of posts on hpoyd but like everyone, life’s a little shaken up by a lot of ridiculousness.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3264 posts in 3729 days


#8 posted 02-09-2021 05:14 PM

Great achievement! The rant at the end just looked like expressing facts to me.

View 55woodbutcher's profile

55woodbutcher

78 posts in 880 days


#9 posted 02-09-2021 05:25 PM

Wonderful!

View 987Ron's profile

987Ron

805 posts in 370 days


#10 posted 02-09-2021 05:25 PM

Enjoyed the pictures and descriptions. Great perseverance and workmanship. The finished project is something to always have where it can be seen.

-- Ron

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13615 posts in 3747 days


#11 posted 02-09-2021 05:29 PM

I’ve always loved you, Grandpa

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Don W's profile

Don W

19988 posts in 3621 days


#12 posted 02-09-2021 10:19 PM

Pretty nice for a southern doctor! It’s definitely a lot of work!

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13615 posts in 3747 days


#13 posted 02-09-2021 11:06 PM

Is West Virginia the South? Lol, I was born in Texas, so I’ll take it!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Don W's profile

Don W

19988 posts in 3621 days


#14 posted 02-09-2021 11:53 PM



Is West Virginia the South? Lol, I was born in Texas, so I ll take it!

- Bertha


Definitely south of NY ;-)

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13615 posts in 3747 days


#15 posted 02-10-2021 01:09 AM

Good point. I got those shaving pics for you.

This is medium set on mahogany:

Pretty thin:

Decent on end grain:

Peekaboo window doesn’t seem to clog.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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