LumberJocks

Homemade 20 inch disc sander.

  • Advertise with us
Project by Ken90712 posted 02-06-2021 02:00 PM 1246 views 5 times favorited 24 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’m just getting into segmented turning, although I love it I need to be sure before dropping 2k on a 20 inch disc sander. Not that I don’t normally look for reasons to buy tools lol.

It is made out of two 3/4 inch MDF plates laminated together. Cut round on bandsaw and trued up on lathe. Then built table with a stop underneath to line up perfectly by sliding it on the bed. Has 1 1/4-8 face plate mounted to back of discs.

Works out amazingly well for very little money. Use 20 inch stick on discs. Run it approximately 600 rpms. Thx for looking. Cheers.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"





24 comments so far

View  woodshaver Tony C   's profile

woodshaver Tony C

7923 posts in 4403 days


#1 posted 02-06-2021 02:13 PM

There is something so satisfying about making something a $2K machine can do!
Nice work

Ken! Love your shop the space alone make me drool!

-- St Augustine FL, Experience is the sum of our mistakes!

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

17984 posts in 4239 days


#2 posted 02-06-2021 02:54 PM

Thx Tony, was just thinking of and looking at your rocking chairs. I need to go get the plans printed. So many project and such little time lol cheers

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

7456 posts in 1624 days


#3 posted 02-06-2021 04:13 PM

I like it. Clever to use the lathe motor, and speed control for it.

Have you removed a PSA disc from the plywood yet? Wondering if that will be problematic. Or did you coat the plywood with something to fill in the pores?

-- Think safe, be safe

View MrWolfe's profile

MrWolfe

1514 posts in 1173 days


#4 posted 02-06-2021 04:56 PM

I agree… very clever and bookmarked for future reference.
Great idea and build.
thanks for sharing.

View savannah505's profile

savannah505

1870 posts in 4636 days


#5 posted 02-06-2021 05:08 PM

Good job Ken. I’ve made many tools that don’t exist out there or I needed and couldn’t afford. “therealSteven” is right about what he said. If that becomes a problem, then a possible solution is to laminate the front and rear with a laminate. Do both sides to prevent warping and use epoxy as your adhesive. Your glue has to be stronger than the adhesive on the sanding discs so the sanding disc pulls off and not the laminate.

-- Dan Wiggins

View lew's profile

lew

13331 posts in 4805 days


#6 posted 02-06-2021 05:41 PM

Fantastic build, Ken.

As some of the others have mentioned about removing the PSA disc. Years ago I made a smaller version and used Formica on the surface to facilitate removal. Have you considered getting a 1 1/4×8 tap and making threaded wooden faceplates that can be glued directly to your shop made accessories. It really saves tying up a metal faceplate.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile (online now)

woodbutcherbynight

8729 posts in 3459 days


#7 posted 02-06-2021 06:12 PM

Love stuff like this. Good advice on the Formica. Both sides provides stability. Definitely use epoxy.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View htl's profile

htl

5375 posts in 2209 days


#8 posted 02-06-2021 10:35 PM


Have you removed a PSA disc from the plywood yet? Wondering if that will be problematic. Or did you coat the plywood with something to fill in the pores?

- therealSteveN

Heat will break the glue loss very quickly.

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs https://www.lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/130264

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

6909 posts in 1871 days


#9 posted 02-06-2021 11:43 PM

Neat idea… I have done similar (I mean using a lathe to advantage variable speed), however, I opted for hook and loop. The starter (loop) sheets are expensive, at least in Australia, (probably) $20-$30 for your size and the discs may be hard to source (unless you buy in rolls and cut your own), but the convenience speaks for itself. Makes changing grit a helluva lot easier.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View swirt's profile

swirt

6102 posts in 4022 days


#10 posted 02-07-2021 01:13 AM

Clever solution and probably better than can be bought.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

26055 posts in 4155 days


#11 posted 02-07-2021 05:08 AM

Nice handy tool, Ken. I have a 1644 lathe, so mine is only 15 1/2”. Nice work on it. They sure come in handy. I have heard that they make hook and loop pads at 10” so I may make a 10” one with hook and loop sanding discs for easy changing!!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Ivan's profile

Ivan

16718 posts in 3917 days


#12 posted 02-07-2021 10:46 AM

EXCELLENT …THE MONSTER!!!

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

6921 posts in 2437 days


#13 posted 02-07-2021 02:22 PM

Nicely done. I may finally have to do this. Adding to my favorites as a reminder. Did you consider attaching a block you can clamp into a chuck instead of attaching a faceplate?

I am also thinking about making the Shipwright drum sander. That might also be handy to have when doing segmented glue ups.
Click for details

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

6909 posts in 1871 days


#14 posted 02-07-2021 02:53 PM



.... Did you consider attaching a block you can clamp into a chuck instead of attaching a faceplate?
- Lazyman

Alternatively a Lathe Spindle Tap so you can just thread it onto the spindle.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

6921 posts in 2437 days


#15 posted 02-07-2021 03:17 PM

I thought about that LBD but I was a little concerned about stress or flexing on such a large disk. It seems like clamping a block in your largest jaws on the chuck might be a little more rigid. Maybe that’s not a problem.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

showing 1 through 15 of 24 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com