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Sanding Station

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Project by RyanGi posted 01-15-2021 04:17 PM 987 views 4 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is a sanding station I made specifically to create a co-planer space for my Flat Master v-sander and my oscillating sander to sit on that allowed out feet onto my assembly table.

The carcass is 3/4 ply, held together with pocket hole screws. I banded all the edges with walnut for color contrast and then added birch splines to the banding as a accent. The whole thing rests on 4” poly castors.

There’s an end door (under the oscillating sander) that houses a stand alone dust collection system. It’s just a bucket head vac and a bucket top thein-style separator, but both tools are connected to it and it works well enough. Both main tool and the vac system are tied together with a machine-start switch so the vac comes on with the tools and stay on about 8 seconds after they turn off. Which I think helps a lot with keeping the light dust down.

Leveling the tools so everything lines up was a bit of a chore, and I had to cobble together a leveling system on them to make it all work..and math…

There are two drawers for hand sanding tools and storage, which is awesome because I’ve got a fair amount of sanding tools.

I finished it in straight amber shellac. My goal, if you can call it that, was to see if I could reproduce that 50s ‘shop furniture’ color pallet…in an effort to match my shop cabinets which were taken from an old university chemistry lab years ago when they were demo’ing it. To be honest, it’s not my favorite style of finish, aesthetically, but it came out the way I wanted it to so I’m happy with that.

This was a fun, functional project that has paid me back 10x over. Having the Flat Master set up the way it is has become my go-to method for level sanding. I added an extruded piece of aluminum track that is dead nuts square to use as a clamp on fence so it also functions like a gentle joiner.

Overall a great built for me functionally!

-- I like chips...and sawdust...but mostly chips...with vinegar





7 comments so far

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

8492 posts in 3275 days


#1 posted 01-15-2021 04:48 PM

That’s a great looking set up.

View RyanGi's profile

RyanGi

24 posts in 46 days


#2 posted 01-15-2021 05:15 PM

Thanks! I’m happy with it.

-- I like chips...and sawdust...but mostly chips...with vinegar

View woodchuckerNJ's profile

woodchuckerNJ

1453 posts in 2643 days


#3 posted 01-15-2021 06:29 PM

gotta ask how you leveled it? everytime you move it you will have to relevel it unless you have a 3 point system.

That’s how I have done my carts, made them touch on 3 points with 4 wheels. Doesn’t matter what the ground does.
If you’ve ever dealt with metal working lathes, or surface plates you realize how sensitive things can be, and how much twist can be done w/out proper leveling or a 3 point system.

Looks good though. Curious about the fence, your shots don’t show everything.

-- Jeff NJ

View RyanGi's profile

RyanGi

24 posts in 46 days


#4 posted 01-15-2021 07:02 PM


gotta ask how you leveled it? everytime you move it you will have to relevel it unless you have a 3 point system.

Looks good though. Curious about the fence, your shots don t show everything.

- woodchuckerNJ

I rarely move it, and if I do I have line ups for putting in back in place. Of course, it’s set up to use the assembly as an outfeed table, not a true joiner bed…being wood on rollers it’s never going to be truly ‘co-planer’ so I probably should have chosen another word. But it really seems to line up well each time I’ve moved it back, at least for what I’m using it for. And of course you’re right, in my metal working the three-point reference is king…but then .001” is a big deal deal there too!

I attached some pics of the fence. It’s just an extruded track that I hold in place with some clamps. I put some grippy tape on the bottom, leave space for the mouth of the machine to help keep it from slipping and to raise it up just enough not to sand the fence.

The Flat Master is a really simple design, but it does require an understanding of setup and use to be used successfully. There are a bunch of videos on it, but the biggest part is that (since stock is fed manually across it) constant feed speed is important. In fact you can tune how much stock you’re removing, at least to a degree, based on feed speed. Of course that means you need to be consistent with your feeds! Having the fence helps give a second reference point to push against which helps with maintaining that constant feed.

Anyway, it’s one of my favorite tools. Great family owned company from Canada.

-- I like chips...and sawdust...but mostly chips...with vinegar

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

7746 posts in 3418 days


#5 posted 01-15-2021 07:19 PM

Looks good and well thought out as to what you wanted it to do. Nice work.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View TheOCDmaker's profile

TheOCDmaker

24 posts in 21 days


#6 posted 02-08-2021 01:57 PM

very cool set up. i am planning how to set up my new tiny shop and i like the idea of being to lower the cabinet and sort of let the tool tops be the outfeed instead of setting them and taking them down or making flip tops etc. looks like the v-sander is basically a drum sander type set up? also, what do you have stuck to the side of your extruded aluminum fence? hardboard? (pic is hard to tell) anyway, thanks for sharing. this will definitely help me and has already got some wheels turning… ;)

-- AL, The OCD Maker, http://www.

View RyanGi's profile

RyanGi

24 posts in 46 days


#7 posted 02-08-2021 03:04 PM


looks like the v-sander is basically a drum sander type set up? also, what do you have stuck to the side of your extruded aluminum fence? hardboard? (pic is hard to tell) anyway, thanks for sharing. this will definitely help me and has already got some wheels turning… ;)

- TheOCDmaker

That’s just some adhesive non-skid that I put on there to keep it from slipping when its in place with clamps. The fence is on its side in that pic.

The basic concept of the sander is that, unlike a drum sander, there’s no spring pressure pushing the sanding drum into the wood. As a result, as the drum spins, the paper is ‘thrown’ away from the drum creating an air gap which reduces heat. I can confirm I’ve never seen pitch staining, burning or burnishing with this setup…supposedly all due to the lack of spring pressure and the Velcro backed paper.

The downside is that there is no auto feed, so you manage the feed manually. And the feed is directly related to how much material is removed on each pass…so an inconsistent feed rate yields an inconsistently sanded panel. I haven’t found it to be much of an issue, but the fence really does help with larger pierces to kind of give you a purchase point to push against as you feed.

The drum is a non-static material so the sawdust just drops off it to a vacuum port below. I’ve set it up with a small bucket head vac and machine power switch. Works great with very very little uncollected dust.

Also of interest, since a more coarse grit paper is thicker (because of the larger grit size), there’s no need to adjust the drum position to increase or decrease cut. A more coarse paper will naturally sit higher and therefor be more aggressive, a finer grit paper sits lower and is less aggressive yielding a more refined finish.

I can’t tell you how much I’ve enjoyed this machine. Once set up, and (in my case) leveled for out feed, it just works. I can’t remember the last time I used my ROS.

-- I like chips...and sawdust...but mostly chips...with vinegar

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