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Woven Charcuterie Boards

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Project by BCWP posted 01-09-2021 01:26 PM 811 views 1 time favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

After becoming mesmerized by some of the boards I saw on several posts, I decided I need to “branch out”.

These are my first 2 attempts, and although they look great from a distance, my next boards should be better.

Ultimately, I would like to make a top for a credenza that is about 5 feet long.

Am I being overly ambitious?

-- “Today is only one day in all the days that will ever be. But what will happen in all the other days that ever come can depend on what you do today." Hemingway - "For Whom the Bell Tolls"





11 comments so far

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

4635 posts in 2227 days


#1 posted 01-09-2021 03:52 PM

Overly? not at all!

It’s a learning curve for sure, like anything else. “Practicing” on serving board is probably the best way to tackle the techniques you are trying to perfect. Being careful with fit and avoiding defects like cracks and gaps takes experience.

In my opinion, the most difficult thing is taking an otherwise fine creation to the bandsaw to rip it apart for another series of inlays 8^)

View pottz's profile

pottz

14691 posts in 1989 days


#2 posted 01-09-2021 05:35 PM

thats very cool looking,a lot of work though.hey nothing wrong with being ambitious,i say go for it.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View OnhillWW's profile

OnhillWW

291 posts in 2237 days


#3 posted 01-09-2021 05:58 PM

Man that is beautiful. Did you start cutting wood with the end product fully formed in your mind (or on paper) or was there some “winging it” as you went along and perhaps a bit of serendipity? It is very artful.

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

View Skylark53's profile

Skylark53

2852 posts in 4065 days


#4 posted 01-09-2021 08:00 PM

This is nice. I like all the activity. The colors are great. The designs is interesting and fun to see each time its used. This is useful and gorgeous.

-- Rick, Tennessee, John 3:16

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

7214 posts in 1579 days


#5 posted 01-10-2021 01:13 AM



Overly? not at all!

It s a learning curve for sure, like anything else. “Practicing” on serving board is probably the best way to tackle the techniques you are trying to perfect. Being careful with fit and avoiding defects like cracks and gaps takes experience.

In my opinion, the most difficult thing is taking an otherwise fine creation to the bandsaw to rip it apart for another series of inlays 8^)

- splintergroup

Absolute agreement with Bruce.

Perhaps the express school for learning about glue ups.

How many bandsaw cuts, and how many clampings are we seeing there?

-- Think safe, be safe

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

3055 posts in 2954 days


#6 posted 01-10-2021 12:08 PM

Thanks for posting. I have been wondering how this is done. Another thing on my list. Very nice board.

-- Petey

View BCWP's profile

BCWP

28 posts in 945 days


#7 posted 01-10-2021 01:35 PM

Ain’t that just the truth! I shuddered every time I did it.


Overly? not at all!

It s a learning curve for sure, like anything else. “Practicing” on serving board is probably the best way to tackle the techniques you are trying to perfect. Being careful with fit and avoiding defects like cracks and gaps takes experience.

In my opinion, the most difficult thing is taking an otherwise fine creation to the bandsaw to rip it apart for another series of inlays 8^)

- splintergroup


Overly? not at all!

It s a learning curve for sure, like anything else. “Practicing” on serving board is probably the best way to tackle the techniques you are trying to perfect. Being careful with fit and avoiding defects like cracks and gaps takes experience.

In my opinion, the most difficult thing is taking an otherwise fine creation to the bandsaw to rip it apart for another series of inlays 8^)

- splintergroup


-- “Today is only one day in all the days that will ever be. But what will happen in all the other days that ever come can depend on what you do today." Hemingway - "For Whom the Bell Tolls"

View BCWP's profile

BCWP

28 posts in 945 days


#8 posted 01-10-2021 01:40 PM

No, I “wandered”, wondering how the end would look; if I would even like it. My band saw is too small, really, for a big job. Maybe I have to “acquire” a new one.

But then here in Ottawa, Canada, we have a place where I can rent time (Called “My Urban Workshop”). They have every tool one could ever want, and after being certified on a piece of machinery, it only costs $20CAD/h.


Man that is beautiful. Did you start cutting wood with the end product fully formed in your mind (or on paper) or was there some “winging it” as you went along and perhaps a bit of serendipity? It is very artful.

- OnhillWW


-- “Today is only one day in all the days that will ever be. But what will happen in all the other days that ever come can depend on what you do today." Hemingway - "For Whom the Bell Tolls"

View BCWP's profile

BCWP

28 posts in 945 days


#9 posted 01-10-2021 01:51 PM

I think it was 7 glue ups per board. Cutting the strips was difficult for me. I tried a jig that I saw on YouTube, and I ended up at the ER to have a fingertip repaired. (My error, not the jigs).

I finally used my helical planer. Because I did not want to trust the planer down to 1/8”, I placed a fairly long piece of flat, level wood under the knives, made sure the downside of the wood had some “grip” to it so it would not move. I made sure the top side was very smooth and sanded.

I then ran thin pieces if ash, maple, purple heart and walnut through the planer. I was quite surprised how easily the strips ran through.

Worked well, I thought, and very safe.

Overly? not at all!

It s a learning curve for sure, like anything else. “Practicing” on serving board is probably the best way to tackle the techniques you are trying to perfect. Being careful with fit and avoiding defects like cracks and gaps takes experience.

In my opinion, the most difficult thing is taking an otherwise fine creation to the bandsaw to rip it apart for another series of inlays 8^)

- splintergroup

Absolute agreement with Bruce.

Perhaps the express school for learning about glue ups.

How many bandsaw cuts, and how many clampings are we seeing there?

- therealSteveN


-- “Today is only one day in all the days that will ever be. But what will happen in all the other days that ever come can depend on what you do today." Hemingway - "For Whom the Bell Tolls"

View Wudmakr's profile

Wudmakr

6 posts in 44 days


#10 posted 01-11-2021 03:53 PM

That is so beautiful. I’d love to make a charcuterie board like this. Nice work!

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

2051 posts in 4086 days


#11 posted 01-11-2021 05:08 PM

Very nice work.

-- Chris K

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