LumberJocks

Funnel Bowl Failure!

  • Advertise with us
Project by MovingChips posted 12-23-2020 03:11 PM 784 views 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have mixed emotions about this finished project. It seemed to be one failure after another, which I believe is partly because of my inexperience. I’m a little disappointed at myself and yet I think it turned out alright. What do you think?

Next project, I will be downsizing to something much smaller.

Link to the video: Funnel Bowl Failure turned into success?





6 comments so far

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

26060 posts in 4159 days


#1 posted 12-23-2020 04:24 PM

Good looking bowl. I think we all have made a funnel at one time. I use a drill to start out removing the center and the bottom of the hole is where I stop. If I go further, I am heading towards a funnel. I’ve had a few students make funnels because they enjoy the turning so much, they forget about the stop point. They are usually “fixable”.

Cheers, Jim

ps. I commented before watching the video. You did not go too deep. You created two inner areas. When a funnel is created by going too deep, the piece comes off the lathe and is sometimes damaged beyond repair.

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View MrWolfe's profile

MrWolfe

1516 posts in 1177 days


#2 posted 12-23-2020 04:41 PM

I’m new to turning also so its great to learn from others. I really like your videos especially all the info you put about the wood species, where its from, janka hardness and allergies. Subscribed! Could you have created a dowel to fit in the funnel hole and then finished it out and called it a feature instead of a failure?
Good video production values.
Keep it up.

View MovingChips's profile

MovingChips

248 posts in 294 days


#3 posted 12-23-2020 04:46 PM



Good looking bowl. I think we all have made a funnel at one time. I use a drill to start out removing the center and the bottom of the hole is where I stop. If I go further, I am heading towards a funnel. I ve had a few students make funnels because they enjoy the turning so much, they forget about the stop point. They are usually “fixable”.

Cheers, Jim

ps. I commented before watching the video. You did not go too deep. You created two inner areas. When a funnel is created by going too deep, the piece comes off the lathe and is sometimes damaged beyond repair.

- Jim Jakosh

Woodturning is addicting and I can see myself turning a log into a toothpick very easily. Yeah this funnel was completely my fault and I may still revisit this by plugging it.

View MovingChips's profile

MovingChips

248 posts in 294 days


#4 posted 12-23-2020 04:51 PM



I m new to turning also so its great to learn from others. I really like your videos especially all the info you put about the wood species, where its from, janka hardness and allergies. Subscribed! Could you have created a dowel to fit in the funnel hole and then finished it out and called it a feature instead of a failure?
Good video production values.
Keep it up.

- MrWolfe

Honestly… this bowl seemed to be cursed. I really just wanted to get past this project. After editing the video I have been thinking about plugging and revisiting this on the lathe. So to answer you question, absolutely could have plugged it and called it an intentional design feature. LOL

I’m glad you like the video. I am finding the information about the wood fascinating too.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2951 posts in 4496 days


#5 posted 12-23-2020 06:40 PM

We all start out with some hard knock learning. You video was entertaining. As far as the bowl being “cursed” is concerned. I only complain about that when I find major defects in the wood (voids, cracks and rot) as I turn it.

Your imbalance problem in this case is more of a factor of the size and weight of your lathe. With more experience you will also gain confidence in making the bowl walls and bottom thinner. For most bowls a 1” thick bottom is too thick. I do like the outside design and shape. Also in the video I could see ripples in the bottom, they can be hard to flatten out sometimes. Sanding with a coarse sand paper on a flat piece of scrap helps or use a large 1” bull nose scraper or a flat ended scraper works for me being careful to use the tool rest as a straight edge guide. The “funnel” hole can easily be fixed by drilling a larger hole with a clean cutting Forstner drill bit and them turning a plug to fit. Without a Longworth type lathe mount you will need to sand the plug smooth by hand.

I think you will find it a lot easier to turn bowls if you get a lathe chuck to mount them on. My favorite way to mount a bowl is to use a router with a template guide to cut a circlar recess or dado about 3/16” deep in what I intend to be the top of the bowl. I then turn and sand the bottom and lower part of the sides to completion and create a new recess for the chuck mount in the bottom (some people make and use a spigot instead). I can then turn the inside of the bowl and it is done. The recess in the bottom is left but a spigot can be cut off. One advantage of a recess in the bottom is that I can remount the bowl for application sanding or buffing of the finish. I sometimes decorate the bottom recess with a slightly raised center and making a 3/8” wide full depth ring for the chuck jaws. Sometimes I decorate the raised center with a beaded ring pattern.

-- Les B, Oregon

View MovingChips's profile

MovingChips

248 posts in 294 days


#6 posted 12-23-2020 06:58 PM



We all start out with some hard knock learning. You video was entertaining. As far as the bowl being “cursed” is concerned. I only complain about that when I find major defects in the wood (voids, cracks and rot) as I turn it.

Your imbalance problem in this case is more of a factor of the size and weight of your lathe. With more experience you will also gain confidence…..

- LesB

That is a lot of great information. I will have to put some of this to use in future projects. Especially like the flat scrap wood and sand paper for making it flat and removing the ripples, very simple, cheap and easy to remember.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com