LumberJocks

walnut measuring spoons

  • Advertise with us
Project by Jim Sellers posted 12-22-2020 05:07 AM 1292 views 3 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Made 10 sets of these since I had the jig and depths figured out. Mostly for gifting. Salad bowl finish. Didn’t do an exact grain count on accuracy but they’re close enough.

-- J.C.Sellers, Norcross, Ga. Just cut it right the first time. The best carpenters make the fewest chips.





15 comments so far

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

9454 posts in 2312 days


#1 posted 12-22-2020 08:01 AM

Neat spoons… Didn’t realise wanuts came in so many different sizes.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View swirt's profile

swirt

7779 posts in 4463 days


#2 posted 12-22-2020 02:03 PM

Those are beautiful. Impressive too making 10 sets.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

26546 posts in 2476 days


#3 posted 12-22-2020 03:32 PM

wow thats a lot of spoons,what was your technique doing these ?

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

27799 posts in 4597 days


#4 posted 12-22-2020 03:44 PM

Holy cow…that is a mountain of spoons ! Do you have a shot of you jig for making them?

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

4181 posts in 3774 days


#5 posted 12-22-2020 03:57 PM

Interesting, how did you do that.

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View Jim Sellers's profile

Jim Sellers

523 posts in 3826 days


#6 posted 12-22-2020 08:16 PM

Thanks for all the positive comments. It wasn’t really much of a jig. More like a piece of plywood notched to create stop blocks so the router had about a half inch of travel and was only used on the big spoon. The others were just plunge cuts at the correct depth for accurate measure.

-- J.C.Sellers, Norcross, Ga. Just cut it right the first time. The best carpenters make the fewest chips.

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

4942 posts in 3441 days


#7 posted 12-22-2020 09:31 PM

I think those are really cool! I have no clue as to how you made those!

-- Petey

View Pointer's profile

Pointer

465 posts in 2603 days


#8 posted 12-22-2020 11:16 PM

Those are very impressive. Of course we all want to know how you calibrated them. :)

-- Joe - I am not entirely worthless, I can always serve as a bad example.

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

26546 posts in 2476 days


#9 posted 12-23-2020 12:13 AM

i think he’s keepin his method a secret ?

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Jim Sellers's profile

Jim Sellers

523 posts in 3826 days


#10 posted 12-23-2020 05:25 AM

He heh . No secrets adjust the depth (rounded 1 1/2 bit) and check with the old standard aluminum set for accuracy.
Cut scoop first.Cut around scoop and handle with bandsaw, belt sander. I shoulda took some build pics.

-- J.C.Sellers, Norcross, Ga. Just cut it right the first time. The best carpenters make the fewest chips.

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

26546 posts in 2476 days


#11 posted 12-23-2020 04:09 PM



He heh . No secrets adjust the depth (rounded 1 1/2 bit) and check with the old standard aluminum set for accuracy.
Cut scoop first.Cut around scoop and handle with bandsaw, belt sander. I shoulda took some build pics.

- Jim Sellers


thats kinda what i was thinking.gotta try some.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

27799 posts in 4597 days


#12 posted 12-23-2020 04:38 PM

Jim. that must be a ball nose 1 1/2” bit….right? And the jig was for moving it about 1/2”.

Cheers, JIm

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Jim Sellers's profile

Jim Sellers

523 posts in 3826 days


#13 posted 12-23-2020 07:55 PM



Jim. that must be a ball nose 1 1/2” bit….right? And the jig was for moving it about 1/2”.

Cheers, JIm

- Jim Jakosh

That’s right Jim. it may have been 1 3/4

-- J.C.Sellers, Norcross, Ga. Just cut it right the first time. The best carpenters make the fewest chips.

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

27799 posts in 4597 days


#14 posted 12-24-2020 12:17 AM

Hi Jim. Where did you get that big of a bit? I looked and could not find one. I find it a lot of work to finish the inside of a spoon adequately. I have just finished some sanding balls that helped me with that but I like the idea of a big ball end cutter…I could use it in the mill.

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Jim Sellers's profile

Jim Sellers

523 posts in 3826 days


#15 posted 12-24-2020 04:07 AM



Hi Jim. Where did you get that big of a bit? I looked and could not find one. I find it a lot of work to finish the inside of a spoon adequately. I have just finished some sanding balls that helped me with that but I like the idea of a big ball end cutter…I could use it in the mill.

Cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh


Hey Jim, I checked and it IS a 1 1/2 ball nose. No guide bearings. It was in my collection and if I remember correctly I bought it from peachtree woodworking. It’s a freud so it shouldn’t be hard to find

-- J.C.Sellers, Norcross, Ga. Just cut it right the first time. The best carpenters make the fewest chips.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com