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Misc Turned Firewood 2020

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Project by Lazyman posted 12-11-2020 04:44 AM 1117 views 0 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I thought that I would finally post some of the things I have turned over the last year or so. These are some of my favorites. I’m always looking for interesting things to try or sometimes it just evolves based upon the chunk of firewood I mount on the lathe.

1: Spalted Sycamore bowls a from a log a friend down in Austin collected for me. It sat around for a while before I was able to get it from him and the results of my sloth were pretty stunning.
2: Eastern Red Cedar bowl from a chunk of wood from LJ Duckmilk
3: 2 Bradford pear bowls from a large crotch. The bark inclusion and gap is filled with epoxy with a mica dye.
4: Arizona ash sphere and small platter made from the end that was mounted in the chuck. AA has a reputation as a trash tree but I have been pretty impressed with the quality of the wood I’ve gotten from this particular log.
5: Bradford pear hollow form from a 3-way fork with ebonized BP finial. I love the way that the bark on BP machines and polishes smooth.
6: Tiny Cedar vase sitting on live oak live edge “bowl”. The bowl was turned from this piece I sliced off a log when cutting some boards on my bandsaw. I was experimenting to see if I could turn this into a bowl.

Instead of creating another posting, here are a few more experiments

Eastern red cedar box

Ash Cedar Orb

Inception top (still spinning)

Heart rotted oak

Silver maple. Loose knot was filled with epoxy and dye

Ringmaster plywood orb.

Bradford pear hollow form. Experimented with coloring with Transtint dye. (I guess I forgot to take a picture with the ebonized finial I made for it.

Mesquite

Mesquite with Turquoise inlay

Bottom of the same bowl (with one of my favorite beers)

Time to go finish my beer.

EDIT: I realized that I got distracted by the beer and forgot to add some of the other photos I meant to upload:

Bradford Pear Globe. I used a diamond carbide tool to cut latitude and longitude lines and then applied transtint dyes. I was shooting for sort of a flame effect like they use on guitars but it didn’t really turn out that way.

Tiny sycamore vase:

I don’t remember if this elm or mulberry

Walnut and Hickory stopper for an old carafe:

Misc. wands for some Harry Potter fans
Red Mulberry with textured handle

Bradford pear with hand carved handle

Walnut with carved spiral

A couple of gear shift knobs made for charity auction

And finally a Pecan crotch bowl with turquoise inlay.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.





20 comments so far

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

10643 posts in 3263 days


#1 posted 12-11-2020 05:01 AM

Nice variety of projects. All look well done. Extra cool job with the Transtint dye.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13584 posts in 3600 days


#2 posted 12-11-2020 05:57 AM

Good stuff Nathan.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Keebler1's profile

Keebler1

1750 posts in 928 days


#3 posted 12-11-2020 06:07 AM

Well done Nathan.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8297 posts in 1802 days


#4 posted 12-11-2020 11:28 AM

Cool, Nathan! More things I need to figure out how to try!

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

5817 posts in 2842 days


#5 posted 12-11-2020 11:41 AM

nice work – I guess that kind of turning is not in my future, the ringmaster keeps me plenty busy

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

19186 posts in 2359 days


#6 posted 12-11-2020 01:33 PM

Very nice work Nathan. I like that you take the time to experiment and try different techniques. It certainly pays off for you. I love the BP hollow form with the ebonized finial. The bark inclusion looks great. I’ve done a few BP bowls and it always pays off to try to work some of the bark into the piece :-) I like the BP piece that you dyed too. That looks fantastic!

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

19186 posts in 2359 days


#7 posted 12-11-2020 01:35 PM

BTW, do you freehand your orbs or use a template or some sort of ball turner? Just curious because they look SOOOO much better than when I try to turn a ball :-)

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View MrWolfe's profile

MrWolfe

1668 posts in 1344 days


#8 posted 12-11-2020 01:35 PM

Great work Nathan.
The sycamore and the oak are my favorite two.
All of them are stunning.
Thanks for sharing.
Jon

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7836 posts in 2608 days


#9 posted 12-11-2020 02:40 PM

Thanks Guys.

Jon, the sycamore piece is my favorite in this lot too. I actually made a lid for the larger one out of Bradford pear, but the color just doesn’t look right in contrast to the sycamore so I’ll probably make a new one for it one of these days, if I don’t give it away before then.

Kenny, I turn the orbs freehand. The largest one that I have turned so far is about 9” across and the smallest is about 1.5”. They are not always as perfect as they look but as long as you are not making wood ball bearings :-), it doesn’t really matter. I started by using one of the YouTuber’s technique and got close enough but I usually wound up with an oblong sphere that took a lot more work to get round after parting and rotating it 90°. The trick that I learned from Doc Green is to use a bright light with a narrow beam shining straight down to cast a shadow onto the ways. The higher you hang it, the smaller the shadow. After getting a rough shape, you draw a circle on a piece of paper slightly smaller than the rough shape, place it on the ways beneath the piece and you can make it almost perfectly round by watching the shadow compared to the circle as you remove wood down to the line. I usually have to close the garage door and turn off the overhead lights in the shop to see the shadow well enough. After parting and rotating it 90°, you mostly just have clean up where you parted it off. I then typically sand it to up to about 1000 grit rotating about 45° and sand it again before moving on to the next grit. I turned a couple of cup blocks to hold the pieces after parting it off. I find I can make quick work of sanding with one of these from peachtreeusa.com

I think it was on sale when I bought it.

Another handy device for this is one of these Live Tailstock Chuck Adapter from PSI. This allows me to support the work between cup blocks when rounding the ends, sanding and applying a friction finish.

Docgreenwoodturner.com is a wealth of turning tips. In fact, I simply followed his written description of spindle turning technique when I first started rather that watching YouTube video.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View bushmaster's profile

bushmaster

4134 posts in 3503 days


#10 posted 12-11-2020 02:53 PM

Enjoyed seeing all your wood turning creations

-- Brian - Hazelton, British Columbia

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7836 posts in 2608 days


#11 posted 12-11-2020 03:36 PM

I realized this morning that I forgot to upload some images so I added a few more. I guess I got distracted by the beer.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

20261 posts in 2205 days


#12 posted 12-11-2020 04:09 PM

all beautiful stuff i hope i can do half as good someday.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7836 posts in 2608 days


#13 posted 12-11-2020 04:33 PM

Thanks Brian and Pottz.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View drsurfrat's profile (online now)

drsurfrat

993 posts in 407 days


#14 posted 12-11-2020 06:03 PM

It’s great to have a large collection of beautiful images to meander through. Thanks for sharing.

-- Mike (near Boston) ... Laziness is the mother of invention, necessity is the mother of exhaustion - me

View duckmilk's profile

duckmilk

4828 posts in 2545 days


#15 posted 12-11-2020 10:50 PM

Wow Nathan, that’s a lot of cool stuff. I saw a couple when I was at your place, but had no idea you had done that many. BTW, thanks again for the bowl I sent to my nephew.

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

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