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Easy to build DIY Thickness Planer Stand.

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Project by James E McIntyre posted 11-17-2020 11:41 PM 1323 views 2 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is a simple and easy to build stand that can be used for a number of tools or tasks. It had no mortise and tenons but it’s very sturdy.

The wood is Cumaru. My neighbor built a deck and fence from it and through out a pile of it which I salvaged.

This wood is extremely hard and rot proof. It’s rated 3330LBf on the Janka Hardness Scale. It’s from Northern South America and has a high silica content. It’s very hard to work.


I added two cleats on the bottom from the same Cumaru 2” x 4” I made the wheel supports from. I cut it down to a 1-1/2” x 1-1/2” piece to fasten the top boards. This is what the wood looked like from aging in the sun before it was sanded and finished it with polyurethane.


Since the lumber was 3/4” thick I had to add a 2” x 4” piece to the inside of each leg to support the wheels.

It’s the same height of a Dewalt Planer Table which is listed at 30” h but is actually 29.5”
Dimensions are 29-1/2” high
Table top is 22-1/2” x 22-1/2”.
The base is 20-5/8” x 20-5/8”.
The table is 25-1/2” high without the 4” high casters.

It’s fastened together with #8×1-1/2” and 2-1/2” SS Phillips and Star drive screws.

Thanks for visiting.

-- James E McIntyre





15 comments so far

View oldrivers's profile

oldrivers

2422 posts in 2532 days


#1 posted 11-17-2020 11:59 PM

Beautiful build will serve you well for many years, good job.

-- Soli Deo gloria!

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

25717 posts in 4071 days


#2 posted 11-18-2020 12:31 AM

Great stand. James. I used the same locking casters on the one for our Az shop!

JIm

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View mel52's profile

mel52

1826 posts in 1230 days


#3 posted 11-18-2020 02:08 AM

Looks good and solid, should work very well for years to come. Great job. Mel

-- MEL, Kansas

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2036 posts in 1554 days


#4 posted 11-18-2020 02:27 AM

Very nice, I like the color and finish.

Did you consider using two fixed wheels and two swivels? It makes it easier to steer and won’t slide in the cross direction.

Alternatively you could use just two casters and make it move like a wheelbarrow. Lift the non-wheel side slightly and it’ll roll, set it down and the legs hold it steady. No flipping locking levers. That how this stand works.


The two lift handles were an excuse for lathe practice.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1024 posts in 2258 days


#5 posted 11-18-2020 04:31 AM


Very nice, I like the color and finish.

Did you consider using two fixed wheels and two swivels? It makes it easier to steer and won t slide in the cross direction.

Alternatively you could use just two casters and make it move like a wheelbarrow. Lift the non-wheel side slightly and it ll roll, set it down and the legs hold it steady. No flipping locking levers. That how this stand works.


The two lift handles were an excuse for lathe practice.

- Madmark2


Mark thanks for your comment. I used the front and back swiveling casters to move my stands in all directions. I put non swivel casters on on some of my shop tool bases and wished I hadn’t. This arrangement has such a greater spectrum of movement., especially in tire spaces.
I blocked you how did you get through you handsome bastard?

-- James E McIntyre

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

2891 posts in 2029 days


#6 posted 11-18-2020 09:54 AM

I did the very same thing, years ago. Only, I used standard Douglas Fir for the build. Draw-bore dowels and dovetails in the cross beams, and such. It was a big deal fro me, at the time. I put two non-swivel casters at the back and two swivel casters at the front. A very sturdy table it is. It was a table that was to hold my DeWalt Thickness Planer. Then, after discovering that it was too small, too insubstantial, for that purpose, and discovering that my Thickness Planer draws too much power from the house’s system, and was blowing out the circuit breaker, I decided that the table would be better used as a platform for my Carvewright. Then, the Carvewright broke down, and I haven’t garnered the wherewithal, or the incentive, to ship it to Texas for repairs. So, the Carvewright rests, for, lo these many years, under the table saw, for Future Mark to deal with (or not), and the table became the resting place for my bench grinder. It works well enough as that (for the time being, anyhow.)

That’s an excellent table you’ve built there, James.

-- Mark

View RCCinNC's profile

RCCinNC

426 posts in 1292 days


#7 posted 11-18-2020 03:46 PM

Sweet! Your “Camaru” is what I call “Ipe” I believe, and yes, it’s basically indestructible. Built several decks with it…absolutely gorgeous, and it’s exterior stable enough you can actually do some fairly fine detail work with it that doesn’t fall apart over time. I have scraps left over that make for excellent jigs too. Little tough on the saw blades and bits due to the silica content…can give ya some cruel splinters, and of course incredibly heavy…but an amazing material. Your bench looks great! Not only will it give you years of service, I assure you it will do the same for future generations. Nice Job!

-- Live to putter...putter to live!

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

4343 posts in 2188 days


#8 posted 11-18-2020 04:05 PM

I think that passes the “sturdy” test James, looks like fine furniture with that wood and finish 8^)
I can’t tell, does the table have pins or other methods to keep the planer from sliding around?

I thought about making a cart for my planer, but with the ever decreasing floor space, I just use my table saw top 8^)

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1024 posts in 2258 days


#9 posted 11-18-2020 08:39 PM

Thanks for the positive comments guys.

Mark I’d like to see your table.


Sweet! Your “Camaru” is what I call “Ipe” I believe, and yes, it’s basically indestructible. Built several decks with it…absolutely gorgeous,

- RCCinNC

RCCinNC
Ipe is similar but even harder it has a Janka test rating at 3510 LBf. That hard!

-- James E McIntyre

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1024 posts in 2258 days


#10 posted 11-18-2020 08:43 PM

I can t tell, does the table have pins or other methods to keep the planer from sliding around?

- splintergroup

Splinter thanks. I haven’t drilled holes in it yet for bolts. I’m looking at that top holding a drill but I can’t seem to do it. I have to take it off to store it so I use F-clamps for now.

-- James E McIntyre

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1024 posts in 2258 days


#11 posted 11-18-2020 08:47 PM



Great stand. James. I used the same locking casters on the one for our Az shop!

JIm

- Jim Jakosh

Thanks Jim J. I like these casters. I just wish they had 4” in stock instead of the 3” I used.

-- James E McIntyre

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2036 posts in 1554 days


#12 posted 11-18-2020 08:55 PM

Ipe is tough enough to hold machine threads. Drill and tap for whatever size mounting bolts that are called for and bolt directly into the wood.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1024 posts in 2258 days


#13 posted 11-18-2020 09:33 PM



Ipe is tough enough to hold machine threads. Drill and tap for whatever size mounting bolts that are called for and bolt directly into the wood.

- Madmark2

That is one tough wood MadMark. I probably wouldn’t have used the similar Cumaru if I didn’t get it for free

-- James E McIntyre

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

26793 posts in 4816 days


#14 posted 12-16-2020 12:29 AM

Nice job and congratulations on your ‘Daily Top 3’ award.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1024 posts in 2258 days


#15 posted 12-19-2020 07:01 PM



Nice job and congratulations on your Daily Top 3 award.

- Grumpy

Thanks Grumpy!

-- James E McIntyre

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