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nesting measuring cups of teak

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Project by Jim Sellers posted 10-28-2020 07:21 PM 1693 views 7 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Had a 2” thick teak board I wanted to do something with so decided to make a couple more sets of measuring cups. The extra thickness allowed room to make a full cup, unlike my previous sets that only went to 1/2 cup. Almost seems kinda sinful to waste 90% of the mass to make these. Like the others I make them in pairs with the handles cut from the underside of the cups to minimize waste. I really like the smell of teak in the shop. After cutting them out I was surprised at how blotchy and irregular the grain patterns were. We’ll just call them character traits.

for now just rubbed with mineral oil. In a few days when oil soaks in and dries I’ll put a salad bowl finish which will make them suitable for wet or dry and easy to wipe clean.

-- J.C.Sellers, Norcross, Ga. Just cut it right the first time. The best carpenters make the fewest chips.





17 comments so far

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

1740 posts in 2009 days


#1 posted 10-28-2020 07:30 PM

Very nice job. I feel your pain about wasting the 90% but you couldn’t have a measuring cup without that. Congratulations on a nice project

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

10889 posts in 3868 days


#2 posted 10-28-2020 07:56 PM

Wow, bet that took some time to make. Nice work!!

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Ron Stewart's profile

Ron Stewart

392 posts in 3963 days


#3 posted 10-28-2020 08:27 PM

Wow, those are impressive! I’d say you made good use of that teak board.

-- Ron Stewart

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

3220 posts in 1006 days


#4 posted 10-28-2020 09:23 PM

Cool project! I also like the way teak smells, but dont use it so much because of the gluing issues and need for epoxy. Good idea for Xmas presents, and no gluing required.

Interested in how you did the cutouts for the cups? Centering pins on forstners will leave their mark, but I dont see that here.

-- WWBBJ: the first to compare a woman´s cheek to a rose was a poet. The second, an idiot. Dali

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

27701 posts in 4564 days


#5 posted 10-28-2020 10:19 PM

Nice work, Jim Those are sure nice measuring cups..better than you can buy!!

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Jim Sellers's profile

Jim Sellers

520 posts in 3794 days


#6 posted 10-28-2020 10:27 PM

thanks guys for the compliments. Brian; I cut out the scoops undersized with a forstner bit then use the router with a dish bit with the bearing on top around templates made from 1/4 plywood. It leaves a nice rounded finished scoop. No sanding needed on the insides.

-- J.C.Sellers, Norcross, Ga. Just cut it right the first time. The best carpenters make the fewest chips.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

10488 posts in 3724 days


#7 posted 10-29-2020 12:22 AM

Those are really great. They will make a great Christmas gift idea.

View pottz's profile

pottz

25817 posts in 2443 days


#8 posted 10-29-2020 12:52 AM

those are a beautiful set of cups but my wife would never use them,she’s real big on sanitizing anything used for food prep and those would never pass her standards.damn nice work though.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View Eric's profile

Eric

5080 posts in 1332 days


#9 posted 10-29-2020 01:18 AM

Very nice job. They look great.

-- Eric, building the dream

View Jim Sellers's profile

Jim Sellers

520 posts in 3794 days


#10 posted 10-29-2020 02:16 AM

pottz once the oil soaks in and dries I’ll have a hard coat of salad bow finish applied and should be as sanitary as any other.


those are a beautiful set of cups but my wife would never use them,she s real big on sanitizing anything used for food prep and those would never pass her standards.damn nice work though.

- pottz


-- J.C.Sellers, Norcross, Ga. Just cut it right the first time. The best carpenters make the fewest chips.

View redtail's profile

redtail

111 posts in 2583 days


#11 posted 10-29-2020 01:10 PM

I really like these. How do you figure out the proper size of the hole so that they measure accurately?

View Jim Sellers's profile

Jim Sellers

520 posts in 3794 days


#12 posted 10-29-2020 01:36 PM

redtail – Trial and error in the begining. I have plywood templates for the hole diameters. I check volumes with store bought cups. I can always set router depth a little deeper if volumes are a little shy.


I really like these. How do you figure out the proper size of the hole so that they measure accurately?

- redtail


-- J.C.Sellers, Norcross, Ga. Just cut it right the first time. The best carpenters make the fewest chips.

View harum's profile

harum

435 posts in 3102 days


#13 posted 10-29-2020 03:10 PM

Thank you for sharing! These are outstanding! You used Forstner bits to cut out scoops. How did you shape the walls? Bandsaw, then rasps?
Best,
h.

-- "If you're not counting the ripples when throwing pebbles in the water, you're wasting your time."

View TDominy's profile

TDominy

225 posts in 4001 days


#14 posted 10-29-2020 03:11 PM

When I was in school, I worked for a Marine Woodworker. We did a lot of work in teak. It would come on skids also made of teak. The small is great in the shop. Someone mentioned gluing, we used Resorcinol glue. It was a liquid and a powder.

I love the measuring cups and will have to give it a try!

-- By hammer in hand, all things do stand.

View Jim Sellers's profile

Jim Sellers

520 posts in 3794 days


#15 posted 10-29-2020 05:46 PM

Here’s an amazon link to the type of bit used…...https://www.amazon.com/GKD-Template-Carving-Milling-Woodwork/dp/B0885RPVD1/ref=sr_1_128?dchild=1&keywords=router+bit+dish&qid=1603993149&s=hi&sr=1-128

I cut the hole undersized with a forstner bit, then with plunge router, sink in hole and cut around template.

-- J.C.Sellers, Norcross, Ga. Just cut it right the first time. The best carpenters make the fewest chips.

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