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Another "Milkman's workbench."

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Project by D. B. posted 10-17-2020 07:37 PM 932 views 6 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I think we have all seen examples of the low-profile portable workbench called the “Milkman’s bench.” I made an English-style joiners bench and am very happy with using holdfasts. But occasionally I wish I had a vise. I thought the “Milkman” would be a cheap solution for me. I used the metal thread from large C clamps and a nut that fit the thread pattern to drive the vises. The end vise has a traveling wagon with tenons that fit into dados. The longer face vise is more like a twin screw Moxon. I added two guide dowels to help this vise face travel better. The frame is old dry oak, salvaged from the demolition of a 1950’s school house cloak room. I also used two blocks of an unknown hardwood and a salvaged table top made out of some sort of hard tropical wood. When not using it, it hangs on two pegs on the back of my main workbench, handy but out of the way.

It was a fun project and a useful addition to my stock holding devises. The joinery challenged me, but I learned a lot from this project, which I made mostly “by hand and eye.”

Comments welcomed.





11 comments so far

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

2334 posts in 2835 days


#1 posted 10-17-2020 08:37 PM

D.B. that looks like a great add to any shop. Thanks for posting.

-- Petey

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

2334 posts in 2835 days


#2 posted 10-17-2020 08:37 PM

D.B. that looks like a great add to any shop. Thanks for posting.

-- Petey

View SteveMI's profile

SteveMI

1165 posts in 4180 days


#3 posted 10-17-2020 10:08 PM

I need to make one of these.
Steve.

View pinebox's profile

pinebox

36 posts in 2854 days


#4 posted 10-17-2020 10:11 PM

I made one a long time ago with pallet scraps but am just about to start a new one with some oak I got recently. Your dowl idea is great and will definitely get copied. Thanks for showing it.

View swirt's profile

swirt

5581 posts in 3858 days


#5 posted 10-18-2020 01:44 AM

Great work. Looks to be very handy, especially with that super wide clamping area on the face.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

3830 posts in 3054 days


#6 posted 10-18-2020 06:17 AM

Great idea and fulfilment.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View D. B.'s profile

D. B.

32 posts in 2927 days


#7 posted 10-18-2020 10:46 AM

Thanks everyone!

View SubVette's profile

SubVette

177 posts in 2431 days


#8 posted 10-18-2020 06:16 PM

Great idea I need something like this, how did you get the c clamp apart to get the threads? Hack saw them? This is absolutely Brilliant!

-- John in Florida

View D. B.'s profile

D. B.

32 posts in 2927 days


#9 posted 10-18-2020 06:48 PM


Great idea I need something like this, how did you get the c clamp apart to get the threads? Hack saw them? This is absolutely Brilliant!

- SubVette

YES I cut the clamp apart with a hack saw. 1) cut the end off the turning rod, remove the rod, 2)cut the clamping end off.- it was just in the way as I worked. 3) Cut through the barrel of the clamp. Then I pried the two halves of the threaded barrel apart to slide the threaded screw out. Cheap Acme type threads!. Now you can match a nut to the threads, build the frame, assemble at the end re insert the rod and peen it into a mushroom.

View Chiaroscuro's profile

Chiaroscuro

140 posts in 1661 days


#10 posted 10-24-2020 06:11 AM

That is awesome! I would love to do the same eventually, though I’m more in favor of wooden screws (It’s an aesthetic thing for me but I also really like their action compared to metal). Love how you store it. Did you clamp it ‘upside down’ in the photo or had you not put in the dog holes yet?

-- Todd

View D. B.'s profile

D. B.

32 posts in 2927 days


#11 posted 10-24-2020 09:08 PM


That is awesome! I would love to do the same eventually, though I’m more in favor of wooden screws (It’s an aesthetic thing for me but I also really like their action compared to metal). Love how you store it. Did you clamp it ‘upside down’ in the photo or had you not put in the dog holes yet?

- Chiaroscuro

If you look closely in the pictures (zoom feature) you can see the dogs and holes. It is not the bottom of the milkman bench. DB

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