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Finishing Room Exhaust Fan

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Project by woodbutcherbynight posted 10-14-2020 03:43 PM 803 views 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My new finishing room needed a exhaust fan. Key here is that I want to use the windows I have and no new holes in building, and it must be easy to remove for the winter. Used a attic fan from the borg and with framing it just fits in the window. Put a window screen over the side facing out to keep bugs out, on the inside I used 1/4 mesh to keep inquiring fingers, and Father Murphy moments out. Installed a switch and ran the power cord out the bottom. Keeping it neat but functional.

Works perhaps too well. Close the door and open the window on opposite side of room and you can watch the screen get sucked inside. LOL. Even so, cools the room down some but more important will exhaust the fumes when I get my spray equipment set up.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.





13 comments so far

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

25485 posts in 4023 days


#1 posted 10-14-2020 03:51 PM

Great design, Gunny , to make it removable for the winter!!

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View hoss12992's profile

hoss12992

4177 posts in 2810 days


#2 posted 10-14-2020 04:07 PM

Great job buddy

-- The Old Rednek Workshop https://www.facebook.com/theoldrednekworkshoptn

View Ivan's profile

Ivan

16403 posts in 3785 days


#3 posted 10-14-2020 04:12 PM

Hot days are gone…but for next summer…

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View LesB's profile

LesB

2674 posts in 4360 days


#4 posted 10-14-2020 05:54 PM

Looks good.

I would caution you about chances of fire or explosion from spray or fumes. If the motor is not spark protected (proof) and the fumes reach a combustable stage you could have a disaster on your hands.

Also you may consider a filter to catch any over spray that will be drawn to the fan and end up sticking to it.

Finally in some locations building codes could require some sort of fire suppression features for a room dedicated to finishing or spraying. You can ignore that but if there is a fire your insurance may question the situation.

I ran into this when I built a new shop and on the plans I listed a side room as a finishing room and they wanted me to install a sprinkler system…..I immediately changed the name to a “sport” room. Actually that is what it turned out to be used for. I do my spraying outside.

-- Les B, Oregon

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

6639 posts in 3326 days


#5 posted 10-14-2020 07:03 PM



Looks good.

I would caution you about chances of fire or explosion from spray or fumes. If the motor is not spark protected (proof) and the fumes reach a combustable stage you could have a disaster on your hands.

Also you may consider a filter to catch any over spray that will be drawn to the fan and end up sticking to it.

Finally in some locations building codes could require some sort of fire suppression features for a room dedicated to finishing or spraying. You can ignore that but if there is a fire your insurance may question the situation.

I ran into this when I built a new shop and on the plans I listed a side room as a finishing room and they wanted me to install a sprinkler system…..I immediately changed the name to a “sport” room. Actually that is what it turned out to be used for. I do my spraying outside.

- LesB

Good points on the fire issue. Like you I spray outside then bring them into this room to cure for a few days. really don’t care for the poly / lacquer or whatever else I use smell. Now the filter idea for keeping the dust down, that is good idea, Thanks!

Yeah insurance can be a real pain. Had apartment complex behind me send 10 nasty letters about cutting a tree down. Small problem, the tree in question is in my neighbors yard. Took a nasty letter from my attorney to get them to bother the neighbor, not me.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View hutchmp's profile

hutchmp

72 posts in 3869 days


#6 posted 10-14-2020 07:42 PM

I like it! Unless you are doing some extremely heavy production level spraying, there should be no issue with the build-up of fumes. Stating this from experience as an operations manager of a chemical company that had Division 1 Class 2 explosion proof repackaging rooms for solvents. Typical solvent-based finishes don’t have enough volatiles in them to build up to a level that can cause an explosion.

As for the insurance issue brought up, it’s not an issue either. It’s a temporary use room for DIY work if I understood your write up. Unless it specifically forbids this in your insurance policy, you would be covered under what they call the “Dumb Ass Clause”. What it means is that if the homeowner does something stupid that causes damage to the insured property (unintentionally) the claim must be covered. So if you smoke and one night smoke in bed which leads to fire, it will be covered. I am also an insurance adjuster and we see this all the time.

-- Hutch

View Bearpaw's profile

Bearpaw

270 posts in 4638 days


#7 posted 10-14-2020 08:04 PM

No more hot tub?

-- "When we build, let us think we build forever." John Ruskin

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

5962 posts in 1738 days


#8 posted 10-14-2020 09:07 PM

Great way to distribute your paint ’butch’... should save a fortune in paint brushes. A finishing room is not very mobile, however, a detachable fan is a mark of genious… of Da Vinci magnitude.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

6639 posts in 3326 days


#9 posted 10-14-2020 09:11 PM



No more hot tub?

- Bearpaw

Someone made me an offer, was too good to pass up.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View mel52's profile

mel52

1744 posts in 1182 days


#10 posted 10-15-2020 01:38 AM

Sharp idea. I may have to try something like this in one of my windows in my shop. Thanks for sharing. Mel

-- MEL, Kansas

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

9808 posts in 2960 days


#11 posted 10-15-2020 03:21 AM

I like it, good idea. I did something slightly like this in my basement for spraying. No problems after 4 years. Your lungs will thank you.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View iminmyshop's profile

iminmyshop

345 posts in 2911 days


#12 posted 10-15-2020 03:54 AM

If you are not using flammable liquids, I don’t see the problem.
What do you do in the colder months when you want to keep the heat in? Or is that not a problem where you live? Around here it can go well below zero in the winter.

-- http://www.alansfinewoodworking.com/

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

6639 posts in 3326 days


#13 posted 10-15-2020 04:53 AM


If you are not using flammable liquids, I don t see the problem.
What do you do in the colder months when you want to keep the heat in? Or is that not a problem where you live? Around here it can go well below zero in the winter.

- iminmyshop

4 screws and it is out of the window, takes a minute to put the lower window pane of the storm windows back in. Have a place in the crawlspace under this building for it to go with other fans I use in main shop. They are designed the same way.

For winter heating this 10×12 room stays at 55F by using a radiator heater. Our winters rarely go and stay below 30F for any length of time.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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