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Staked Chair for my Granddaughter

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Project by Pat3 posted 08-16-2020 12:18 AM 561 views 1 time favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Originally I was making a second Staked Chair to match my first one, but I was going to saddle the seat, a first for me.
I was using Port Orford Cedar for the seat and back spindles. But somehow I drilled the first two leg holes in the seat at different angles. My thought was to throw out the seat and start over, but my wife suggested to practice saddling this seat since it was going in the burn pile anyway.

I was pretty happy with how it turned out so I drilled the holes for the front legs, hoping I could rectify the angle of the back legs. My wife suggested making it for our grand daughter instead of for the matching chairs. I agreed and decided to make all the chair parts out of Port Orford Cedar.
Here is a pic using dowels for the legs to show how badly the holes were drilled.

Next, I made the legs and spindles as per the instructions.

Here are the legs glued in with the holes re-drilled in the seat.

The spindle round tenons were made by hand using a chisel to rough size then sandpaper for a firm fit. I tried making several round tenon tools but they were way to finicky and shredded the wood, even with freshly sharpened blades. The chisel work was much more controlled and easier.

The Chair was finished with Tried and True BLO/Beeswax.

Now to make a Staked Chair for my Grandson.





13 comments so far

View swirt's profile

swirt

5656 posts in 3892 days


#1 posted 08-16-2020 02:27 AM

NIce recovery, and great looking results. Well done and congratulations on having a wise wife.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16984 posts in 3539 days


#2 posted 08-16-2020 02:37 AM

Wow, Pat, that’s nice work! I’m quite jealous… I gotta get into that kinda work! Q: what’s the tool shaping the tenon? Guessing a Veritas product? ;-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

View Pat3's profile

Pat3

156 posts in 2799 days


#3 posted 08-16-2020 03:23 AM

Thanks guys.

Smitty, yes it is the Veritas tapered tenon cutter. It works very well for use on the tapered leg tenons.

I forgot to mention that I purchased a Scorp from Barr Tools to use in saddling the seat. It is a beautiful, awesome tool that came wicked sharp and just sliced thru the wood. I highly recommend this tool.

I have one more Staked Chair to make, a smaller version for my grandson. Then I plan on building a Welch Stick Chair.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

16984 posts in 3539 days


#4 posted 08-16-2020 03:39 AM

Barr Tools…. i will tag this because it’s cool and I want to remember the tool reference. Thanks Pat, following for more!!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. - OldTools Archive -

View Pat3's profile

Pat3

156 posts in 2799 days


#5 posted 08-16-2020 04:08 AM

View mikeber's profile

mikeber

40 posts in 1780 days


#6 posted 08-16-2020 04:41 AM

Nice job Pat!
Is that a Veritas pull shave on your bench? Did you carve the entire seat with the Barr scorp?
I used a carving wheel with an angle grinder for the same purpose and it did the job quite easily but what a mess! I didn’t imagine that so much sawdust can come out of that poor seat! The scorp is probably less messy in that respect…

View Pat3's profile

Pat3

156 posts in 2799 days


#7 posted 08-16-2020 04:59 AM

Thanks Mike, and yes I used the scorp to “rough” out the most of the seat. Then I used the pull shave to smooth out the rough and high spots left by the scorp. This is where you would normally use a travisher but the pull shave worked very well. Then I used the spokeshave to further smooth out the seat, followed by a card scraper. And lastly I used some sandpaper for final smoothing.
No saw dust.
This was my first seat saddling and I was quite happy with how I turned out. I learned a lot and look forward to the next chair.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6263 posts in 1502 days


#8 posted 08-16-2020 12:53 PM

Well done! Nice to have someone to help with suggestions like that, too! Good job to both of you!

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Pat3's profile

Pat3

156 posts in 2799 days


#9 posted 08-16-2020 01:53 PM

Thanks Dave appreciate the comments.

I have enjoyed following your blog on the bookcases. I almost built a set a few years ago, it is a project I hope to complete one day.

View mikeber's profile

mikeber

40 posts in 1780 days


#10 posted 08-16-2020 06:16 PM

“Thanks Mike, and yes I used the scorp to “rough” out the most of the seat. Then I used the pull shave to smooth out the rough and high spots left by the scorp. This is where you would normally use a travisher but the pull shave worked very well. Then I used the spokeshave to further smooth out the seat, followed by a card scraper. And lastly I used some sandpaper for final smoothing.
No saw dust.
This was my first seat saddling and I was quite happy with how I turned out. I learned a lot and look forward to the next”.

Last week checked with Veritas and the pull shave has been discontinued….Another issue is sharpening all these curved tools.

I have to build a batch of chairs and was wondering what’s the most effective solution. Carving wheel is fast and easy, but again, it needs to be done outside. You won’t believe the amount of sawdust that a chair seat generates.

On a different note: if you consider building more chairs, a (simple) lathe is great for rounding the legs.
Anyway, after building a few chairs, I really appreciate your work! It’s a very common piece of furniture but very few woodworkers tackle it.

View Pat3's profile

Pat3

156 posts in 2799 days


#11 posted 08-16-2020 10:29 PM

Mike, thanks again for your kind words.

That is interesting news about the pull shave. Sharpening the pull shave blade was very easy to do free hand and Barr Tools put out a video on how to sharpen the Scorp which takes the mystery out of it.

Since I mainly use hand tools, I would recommend using the Scorp, then a Travisher, then Spokeshave and the card scraper and sandpaper if needed. It may sound like a lot, but you quickly move from one tool to the next to get the seat where you want it.

I thought about a lathe, but I just don’t want to give up the real estate in my small garage. Plus I prefer hand tools, a sharp chisel makes quick work of the round tenons.

For my Grandson’s chair, I expect to use round dowels for the legs and 1/2” dowels for the back spindles since his chair is going to be so much smaller than what I just made. I have the 3 boards ready to glue up for his seat.

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6263 posts in 1502 days


#12 posted 08-17-2020 01:14 AM

Thanks, Pat. There’s more to follow on the bookcases. I figured out a real time-saver on the back boards today, but need to glue up the next box to make sure I haven’t tricked myself. Either way, it’ll be worth writing about.

Plus with cut lists for the other three sizes of case, and 30-40 more to build, I’ll almost certainly have more stuff I figure out along the way.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Skylark53's profile

Skylark53

2824 posts in 3980 days


#13 posted 08-18-2020 03:13 AM

Time spent doing anything for a granddaughter is time well spent!!
WELL DONE!!!!

-- Rick, Tennessee, John 3:16

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