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Router Planer Jig

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Project by noynek posted 08-13-2020 11:06 AM 874 views 4 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’ve been wondering how to level some log rounds for various purposes including benches and epoxy art experiments. I really liked the adjustability of this design

The downside is that it takes a lot of space and isn’t very portable. That led me to design something that was lightweight, adjustable, and portable. It’s not the most stable, but it works well for my purposes.





8 comments so far

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

5425 posts in 1669 days


#1 posted 08-13-2020 12:00 PM

Cool idea. You would need a level floor… which is about as rare as a blade that never needs sharpening.

Seems like the Bosch’s sucker sucks (not).

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View noynek's profile

noynek

6 posts in 39 days


#2 posted 08-13-2020 04:54 PM

Thanks. After getting the height close to my workpiece, I use a level to dial it in. Of course as I’m sliding the router and rolling the jig around it could fluctuate if the floor is off. So far, my epoxy experiments suggest it’s cutting pretty flat though.

I had to get a third party dust shroud for the Bosch. It’s not perfect, but it’s much better than without.


Cool idea. You would need a level floor… which is about as rare as a blade that never needs sharpening.

Seems like the Bosch s sucker sucks (not).

- LittleBlackDuck


View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

7839 posts in 3113 days


#3 posted 08-13-2020 11:32 PM

Thanks there’s a lot of good ideas in that. I might just have to coy that down the road.

View swirt's profile

swirt

5458 posts in 3820 days


#4 posted 08-14-2020 02:44 AM

I like your solution for adjustable height. What LBD mentioned is not quite right. You don’t need a level floor, you just need a flat floor. Your “sled” will keep the top and bottom co-planar. I have done quite a bit of stump flattening with a version more like TZH’s that you linked to. I do it on a driveway that is flat but not level.

How do you store it? I could see how you could make it come apart… or I could also see it be useful with a detachable table top or something that would make it do double-duty.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View noynek's profile

noynek

6 posts in 39 days


#5 posted 08-14-2020 03:09 AM

Hey, I kinda figured the same about the floor, but I was trying to wrap my mind around it :).

I haven’t had to store it yet because I’m still experimenting with routing out log rounds and filling them with epoxy. I can break it into storable pieces with 4 screws. To make it easier I could replace those with bolts and wing nuts or knobs. I haven’t thought that far yet.


I like your solution for adjustable height. What LBD mentioned is not quite right. You don t need a level floor, you just need a flat floor. Your “sled” will keep the top and bottom co-planar. I have done quite a bit of stump flattening with a version more like TZH s that you linked to. I do it on a driveway that is flat but not level.

How do you store it? I could see how you could make it come apart… or I could also see it be useful with a detachable table top or something that would make it do double-duty.

- swirt


View noynek's profile

noynek

6 posts in 39 days


#6 posted 08-14-2020 03:12 AM

Wow, I love the work on your blog. I’m learning a ton.


I like your solution for adjustable height. What LBD mentioned is not quite right. You don t need a level floor, you just need a flat floor. Your “sled” will keep the top and bottom co-planar. I have done quite a bit of stump flattening with a version more like TZH s that you linked to. I do it on a driveway that is flat but not level.

How do you store it? I could see how you could make it come apart… or I could also see it be useful with a detachable table top or something that would make it do double-duty.

- swirt


View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

5425 posts in 1669 days


#7 posted 08-14-2020 05:43 AM


.... What LBD mentioned is not quite right. You don t need a level floor, you just need a flat floor….
- swirt

I stand corrected… I did mean flat floor… I can be forgiven as I’m only the son of a poor Hungarian fern cutter.

Though, for a “level” flat top, the base of the log and the jig would need to be as co-planar as possible… it’s just a case of your angle.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View swirt's profile

swirt

5458 posts in 3820 days


#8 posted 08-14-2020 07:34 PM



Wow, I love the work on your blog. I’m learning a ton.

Thank you. I try to include more build details there than I put on my project pages here. Glad to hear they are helpful. Cheers.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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