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Warre Garden Hive

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Project by mut posted 07-25-2020 02:27 AM 964 views 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I finally took the plunge into beekeeping. Inspired by the book “The Idle Beekeeper” I dove in with my woodworking interest and built 2 Warre hives. I used 5/4 pine ‘hobby panels’ from the local lumberyard to skip a lot of edge-gluing. Much reading and research produced numerous free plans for the main hive. I used several variations by adding windows to each box, screened bottom boards, modified triangular top bars with 1/2 sides, top screens, stands and also built a feeder box (not pictured). I finished the first one and stocked it with a 3 lb. package of bees and a queen the end of June. 3 weeks later it has 2 full boxes of bees and comb and is going strong. The woodworking was not formidable but it was my first project using metric measurements. It is finished only on the outside with 2 coats of linseed oil. It is an interesting project, not only to build something new, but also make sure that is appealing to humans (a great addition to the garden) and make sure it is healthy for the bees.





7 comments so far

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

25788 posts in 2442 days


#1 posted 07-25-2020 04:32 AM

cool bee hive condo,hey we need more people helping our pollinating friends.bee colonies are under attack daily and are vanishing.without bee’s we are going to be in big trouble.whatever we can do to help them thrive is a good thing.nice project and a good one for our tiny friends.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View oldrivers's profile

oldrivers

3111 posts in 3025 days


#2 posted 07-25-2020 11:28 AM

Fanciest hives I have ever seen. Super good Job. I hope Bees are easier to keep In Washington that they are in Alabama I have lost a lot of Bees over the years so I just dropped that hobby.

-- Soli Deo gloria!

View RCCinNC's profile

RCCinNC

533 posts in 1785 days


#3 posted 07-25-2020 03:42 PM

That is probably the most stylish beehive I’ve ever seen! Beautiful. I’m sure the penthouse floor rent’s way past my pay grade. ; ) I really love it!
It’s good of you to support the bees, and also a bonus when you can take two hobbies and combine them. Your garden will be very pleased. My hope that you, your garden and your busy pollinators stay safe and healthy.
Any time you see a Mosquito Deleto Truck, be sure to slit the tires and ostracize the driver.


cool bee hive condo,hey we need more people helping our pollinating friends.bee colonies are under attack daily and are vanishing.without bee s we are going to be in big trouble.whatever we can do to help them thrive is a good thing.nice project and a good one for our tiny friends.

- pottz

Haha! Pottz! You old softy environmentally conscious guy you…Agree 1000%. Wine grapes need love too. My sister raises Monarchs and I talk to my garden pollinators….lately even more so…; )


Fanciest hives I have ever seen. Super good Job. I hope Bees are easier to keep In Washington that they are in Alabama I have lost a lot of Bees over the years so I just dropped that hobby.

- oldrivers

I’m so sorry to hear that. Between the pesticides, additional heat in the summers, and pathogens…I don’t really no what all is included with the bee die off…but it is an issue that doesn’t receive anywhere near enough attention.

Just another of one of my many soap boxes….

-- Live to putter...putter to live!

View awsum55's profile

awsum55

1285 posts in 1966 days


#4 posted 07-26-2020 04:31 PM

I just saw on “Sunday Morning” that there is now a killer hornet that is killing honey bees. They are 2” long and have large mandibles that they kill the bees with. The guy said it’s the worst sting he has ever had and if they don’t sting you they can bite you hard enough to remove a chunk of skin. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-gAVlh-7WZM

-- "The Answer Is Blowin'n In The Wind" John D, OP, KS

View mut's profile

mut

30 posts in 1660 days


#5 posted 07-26-2020 07:16 PM

That hornet is right here in our county. I have 2 traps that the state is monitoring trying to locate the nest.

View pottz's profile (online now)

pottz

25788 posts in 2442 days


#6 posted 07-26-2020 07:35 PM

yeah there trying hard to eradicate them before they have a good foot hold,if they fail and they spread it could totally devastate the bee population in this country and that would be catastrophic for our agriculture.pray they succeed.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View hockeyfan_019's profile

hockeyfan_019

69 posts in 691 days


#7 posted 07-28-2020 04:55 PM

I think your hive looks beautiful, but just a few comments that may help you out:
- Perhaps it is not your intended location, but just balancing on 2 loose boards isn’t the best idea. High winds can tip it over, or even a less-than-careful clumsy old beekeeper like me if I was not super cautious, which is not easy in the event you get a few of the girls inside your veil
- Build a simple but well anchored stand, on solid ground (or even just patio stones underneath). An 8 or 10” super can each weight more than 80# when it’s full of honey. Once it is on the stand, secure it down with a ratchet strap. In the first unexpected 70mph thunderstorm you see, you’ll be thankful
- Make sure your handles are stout enough to handle the stress of multiple supers
- What glue did you use? Titebond III has worked well for me, and it’s rated for water resistance
- Presumably this is pine, but is it finished? For my pine boxes, I use a treatment that helps block UV damage with as low toxicity as possible. Never finish the inside surfaces. Many folks even put BLO on the outsides, but it cracks over time, as does spar varnish and urethane. Latex works well (there is clear now) but has to be renewed periodically
- Warping can be a problem over time, so keep an eye on it. The bees fill gaps with propolis over time, but doesn’t look as nice
- When you open the screened bottom, try to do it for a short period of time, preferably in the evening. During the day, I found that bees end up getting trapped under there if you are not real careful. If you leave the cover off, they beard down below and sometimes build comb.

Altogether great job! You may want to join Beesource, where you will find a ton of other beekeepers that are more experienced than I am, but that is part of the fun!

-- Most of my tools are older than I am

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