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Covid-19 Cutting Board

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Project by ToddHolmDotCom posted 07-20-2020 08:30 PM 701 views 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have been practicing with inlays and had a 10”X10” piece maple that was about 1.25 thick. I was going to turn it into an end-grain cutting board but decided it would be more fun to turn it into this fun COVID cutting board. The lettering is Walnut, the virus is Bloodwood, and the toxic symbol is Purpleheart. When life gives you lemons you make lemonade, when life gives you a global pandemic you make cutting boards.

-- Todd "I am just a teacher and a carpenter, that doesn't mean I have a God complex. But I am complex."





6 comments so far

View ohwoodeye's profile

ohwoodeye

2526 posts in 4072 days


#1 posted 07-21-2020 12:26 PM

This one made me smile.
Exactly what your lemon statement says….....When something is kicking your butt sometimes you still have to find a lighter side to it all just to get through it. This does it for me. I am also thinking a cutting board with just a giant c-virus inlay would be clever.
Well done.

-- "Fine Woodworking" is the name given to a project that takes 3 times longer than normal to finish because you used hand tools instead of power tools. ----Mike, Waukesha, WI

View ToddHolmDotCom's profile

ToddHolmDotCom

98 posts in 3718 days


#2 posted 07-21-2020 02:15 PM

Thanks OhWoodEye. If we can’t have fun, what’s the point?

-- Todd "I am just a teacher and a carpenter, that doesn't mean I have a God complex. But I am complex."

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

7527 posts in 3123 days


#3 posted 07-21-2020 08:15 PM

Apart from being “sick as ” you have done a very good job. Lets hope it out lasts us all and serves as a reminder to future generations of what sent the world batty over and had to endure in 2019 2020.

-- Regards Rob

View hockeyfan_019's profile

hockeyfan_019

46 posts in 151 days


#4 posted 07-24-2020 12:23 PM

Looks great! You mentioned “practicing with inlays”, but this certainly doesn’t seem like a practice piece! How did you mark and cut all the sections? Presumably you used a CNC to get such a great fit between the positives and negatives around those complicated non-symetrical parts like the virus, but how did you prevent tear-out around the tiny little “pins”? How did you cut such sharp corners for the “spikes” in the ends of the “biohazard” symbols? Seems like whenever I try such things these kind of problems always result in disappointment lol, but yours turned out great, super work!

-- Most of my tools are older than I am

View ToddHolmDotCom's profile

ToddHolmDotCom

98 posts in 3718 days


#5 posted 07-28-2020 03:39 PM

HockeyFan—I did use a CNC for the inlays. There were a couple of practice runs on scraps first but I will also admit that there is a certain amount of luck involved. The hardest part was actually the bio hazard sign. The virus just required some node editing. I made sure that there was at least .1 inch of material everywhere. Every line was >.1 so there would be enough wood to allow for removing some of the surface. The Bio Hazard sign didn’t give me that luxury. The pointed ends were a problem. I will also admit there was a certain amount of luck involved. I was lucky more portions of the plug component didn’t chips off. I was lucky that the wood was a little forgiving. That isn’t always the case. The next one of these I made (one for each of my adult sons who returned home during the pandemic) I ended up with a lot of chip out and voids. But my suggestion is to cut off the excess of with a band saw or table saw leaving 1/16 of an inch and then run it through a drum sander or finish with a random orbital sander. Then fill any gaps with a little AC glue. Really the best advice is to keep the design simple and keep the lines at least .1 wide or more.

-- Todd "I am just a teacher and a carpenter, that doesn't mean I have a God complex. But I am complex."

View hockeyfan_019's profile

hockeyfan_019

46 posts in 151 days


#6 posted 07-28-2020 04:30 PM

Thanks Todd for the advice, and again for showing us your great work :)

-- Most of my tools are older than I am

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