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Multi-Wood Dining Table

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Project by MulliganWoodworking posted 07-10-2020 11:56 PM 600 views 1 time favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This was a small dining table/desk I made for en Etsy customer. I did a similar one 2-3 years ago, and it was really neat seeing how far I’ve come since then. The joints are cleaner and stronger, the table is more solid, and the overall look is miles ahead of what the first one was.

I used red oak, sapele, walnut, alder, and cherry, with sapele skirt and legs. The finish is my personal favorite: A Tung Oil Friction Finish, where the wood is oiled and then wet-sanded from 400 to 4000 grit. In the days after the initial finish, I continually hit it with a polishing pad to make sure it was as smooth and polished as I could make it, and it really paid off in the shine it has. As an added bonus, the legs are detachable for easy shipping and storage!

This was a really nice project. Simple, straightforward, and beautiful. And to top it off, the client loved it and posted a very nice review!

-- Mackenzie Mulligan, trying to get better every day at https://mulliganwoodworking.wordpress.com/





5 comments so far

View cracknpop's profile

cracknpop

437 posts in 3154 days


#1 posted 07-11-2020 04:33 PM

Very nicely done.
Curious, how long did your finishing process take, once you applied oil, wet sanding through all the grits? Did you apply oil with each sanding?
What grit did you sand to before oiling?
Thanks for sharing.

-- Rick - I know I am not perfect, but I will keep pressing on toward the goal of becoming all I am called to be.

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1461 posts in 1393 days


#2 posted 07-11-2020 05:45 PM

Very nice. One suggestion: round the corners.

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View MulliganWoodworking's profile

MulliganWoodworking

16 posts in 567 days


#3 posted 07-11-2020 05:52 PM



Very nicely done.
Curious, how long did your finishing process take, once you applied oil, wet sanding through all the grits? Did you apply oil with each sanding?
What grit did you sand to before oiling?
Thanks for sharing.

- cracknpop

Thanks!

I can’t take responsibility for the finish: I got it from here years ago. But it takes VERY little time compared to any kind of film/poly finish. For this one…an hour of active working time for the initial polish? Eh, probably more like an hour and half with the bottom being finished to 2000.

Be warned, though: It kills sanders. You’re going to want to buy a crap $35 sander off of Amazon for this, because it won’t last longer than 3 or 4 projects of this size.

Basically, I sanded it to 400 grit dry, then applied a very generous coating of slightly thinned tung oil (think puddles of oil rather than a thin coat). I let it sit there for an hour, reapplying oil wherever the wood was especially thirsty. When it looked like it was all evenly soaked, I wiped off most (but not all!) of the oil and got out my junk sander. I started at 400 again, then moved on to 800, 1200, 1500, 2000, and finishing off with an Abralon 4000 grit pad. Each time, following the method that I originally learned, I would do 10 times over the entire table before moving up in grit.

I could talk about this method for days, I love it so much. It produces a waterproof surface that looks and feels amazing. The only downside is that excess oil can sit in the wood for days, up to a week or two, and it will require wiping down once a day or so in order to avoid the oil getting on stuff or hardening on the surface. But if the table is placed in direct sunlight, that process is dramatically accelerated: in the summer here, if I were to leave the project outside in the sun for 5 minutes, I would come back to find the table covered in hard, shiny spots of oil that would require going all the way back to 800 grit to get off. However, with this one, I was able to “season” the table by placing it in sunlight for a couple minutes at a time, continuously wiping down the whole surface to get the extra oil out of there.

-- Mackenzie Mulligan, trying to get better every day at https://mulliganwoodworking.wordpress.com/

View MulliganWoodworking's profile

MulliganWoodworking

16 posts in 567 days


#4 posted 07-11-2020 05:53 PM



Very nice. One suggestion: round the corners.

- Madmark2

Thanks! If the client had requested it, I would have done it. As it is, the corners are just slightly dulled by a quick pass with the sander at each grit.

-- Mackenzie Mulligan, trying to get better every day at https://mulliganwoodworking.wordpress.com/

View swirt's profile

swirt

5321 posts in 3777 days


#5 posted 07-12-2020 02:19 AM

I like it. And thanks for all the details about the finish. I use pure Tung oil a lot, but rarely end up sanding it up to that high a grit. Great results.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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