LumberJocks

Yet Another Crosscut Sled

  • Advertise with us
Project by Calmudgeon posted 06-29-2020 11:33 PM 512 views 3 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

As summer arrives, I like to take a pause from paying jobs and focus for a couple months on my own work (I’m “retired”; I can afford this luxury). This year I decided to to a few things to improve efficiency and productivity around the shop.

One thing on that list was a truly accurate, expandable crosscut sled with a built-in tape measure and flip stop. This is the result.

Many will recognize that it’s based on the Woodsmith/ShopNotes Precision Crosscut Sled. I used their ideas as a jumping off point, modifiying the plan liberally to suit my needs. For instance, I wanted considerably more capacity than their plan offered, so I made the sled both deeper (front to back) and longer. The main ideas I borrowed from their plan:
  • The detachable extension
  • The movable offcut side, which allows for adjusting the kerf.
Other features:
  • 32” bed to the right of the blade, allowing for a 30” cut.
  • 62” bed with the extension, allowing for a full 5’ cut.
  • The basic sled (minus the extension) does not interfere with the router table at the end of the saw bed, which allows me to leave the router set up unless I need a very long cut.
  • The Woodsmith plan uses a Kreg track and Kreg flipstop. I just used some standard 1/4” t-track I had on hand and the Veritas/Lee Valley flip stop.
  • I used the Kreg 30” miter slot bar (aluminum). I’ve used the Incra bars (steel) on sleds in the past. I may live to regret this decision. I have some concern that the plastic adjustment screws used to snug the bar in the miter slot will wear over time and things will become sloppy. Time will tell.

I touched all the surfaces with a generous coat of tung oil. Then I applied an equally generous coat of paste wax to the bottom of the sled. It slides quite effortlessly.

A very amazing thing happened to me when I went to square off the fence. I was prepared to use William Ng’s “5 Cuts to a Perfect Crosscut Sled” method. I made the first four cuts on a 17” square piece of hardboard and then ripped a small strip off to test the accuracy. I measured both ends of the strip with a digital caliper. Bang on. The same width RIGHT TO THE THOUSANDTH OF AN INCH. I think the odds of that happening on the first attempt must be the same as winning the lottery or being hit by lightening. Needless to say I screwed that puppy down in a heartbeat.

Thanks for viewing. Constructive criticism and/or questions always welcome.

-- "As are the things we make, so are we ourselves." - Lin Yutang





7 comments so far

View kevin boes's profile

kevin boes

19 posts in 25 days


#1 posted 06-30-2020 01:09 AM

that is a nice cross cut sled its a monster nicely done

-- kevin indiana

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

2760 posts in 1985 days


#2 posted 06-30-2020 03:55 AM

Great post with words and pics…

-- Desert_Woodworker

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

1957 posts in 2720 days


#3 posted 06-30-2020 11:05 AM

Really nice sled. The same thing happen to me on my first attempt.

-- Petey

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

7594 posts in 3036 days


#4 posted 07-01-2020 03:04 PM

That’s very impressive.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

5757 posts in 1345 days


#5 posted 07-01-2020 09:59 PM

Wow that sled looks like it might have 2 zip codes. How much do you think it weighs? My first couple were huge like that, and since I have figured I’d rather have 2 or 8 of them, just to do a single purpose, and be able to make them smaller so I don’t get a strain moving them to the saw.

It looks awesome, just much larger than I would want to move around. Hope your back holds up.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Calmudgeon's profile

Calmudgeon

318 posts in 2198 days


#6 posted 07-01-2020 11:26 PM



Wow that sled looks like it might have 2 zip codes. How much do you think it weighs? My first couple were huge like that, and since I have figured I d rather have 2 or 8 of them, just to do a single purpose, and be able to make them smaller so I don t get a strain moving them to the saw.

It looks awesome, just much larger than I would want to move around. Hope your back holds up.

- therealSteveN

I’m guessing it’s somewhere around 30 lbs. or a little better. It’s more awkward than heavy. My goal was to have the basic sled large enough that it would accommodate 90% or more of my cuts. Without the extension the sled isn’t exceptionally large, and it’s certainly less cumbersome. Detaching and attaching the extension is simply a matter of screwing out or in two 5/16” knobs, so I can always do that at the saw.

I wanted the added capacity primarily for cutting stiles for larger doors (like upper kitchen cabinets).

I have three other sleds. One of them, believe it or not, is bigger and much heavier than this one. I use it to cut cabinet carcasse components to length. I’m looking to redesign it in the not too distant future.

-- "As are the things we make, so are we ourselves." - Lin Yutang

View hockeyfan_019's profile

hockeyfan_019

3 posts in 3 days


#7 posted 07-02-2020 08:33 PM

That sled looks awesome. Way better than my janky 1/2” exterior ply glued to a thin strip of pallet wood…

Funny though, I thought one time I was lucky enough to have cut several parts to the exact same size, as measured on my dial indicator. Wow! Then I noticed the pin was all the way out to the end of adjustment, thus guaranteeing that ANY part I tried to measure was exactly the same size… If it is digital, check your battery too, or I could tell you a story about that too LOL.

-- Most of my tools are older than I am

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com