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Tiger Eye Bradford Pear Jar

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Project by Lazyman posted 06-03-2020 03:47 PM 656 views 3 times favorited 18 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is the item I made for the Turning box Swap2020 and sent to LJ stripit. This is my first true hollow form not made using the Ringmaster or bowl from a board technique. This is made from a piece of green Bradford pear found on someones trash pile waiting for pickup. When cutting the blank, I took care to not include any of the juvenile wood (sometimes called pith) to minimize warping. This piece is from a fork of the tree and has a little burl-like figure and bark inclusion. The grain seemed a little boring so I decided to try popping the grain using Trifern’s 2DYE4 technique to see if I could get sort of a tiger eye effect. I did an initial trace coat using walnut Transtint dye, sanded it back pretty aggressively and then applied an amber dye on top followed with just enough sanding to remove any raised grain. Its a great way to make what might otherwise be a pretty boring piece really pop.

The top and finial are turned from a Bradford pear branch, though the very tip was turned separately from a piece of silver maple. I hollowed the bottom of the top to make it dry more quickly and to lighten it. I initially tried the same walnut and amber dye technique but the color didn’t turn out the same, probably because it is mostly juvenile wood. I decided to go full contrast and use a heavy coating of black transtint dye.

Both are finished with gloss wiping poly made by mixing 2:1 of Minwax oil base gloss and mineral spirits. I applied so many coats I lost count. As a first hollowing attempt, it turned out well but I sort of chickened out and left the walls, especially near the base, a little thick so it is really too heavy, IMO. I may have to make a hollowing stabilizer tool to make it a little more stable when the walls start getting thin.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.





18 comments so far

View HokieKen's profile (online now)

HokieKen

14062 posts in 1914 days


#1 posted 06-03-2020 03:57 PM

Awesome Nathan. Just awesome. The finish is spectacular. I definitely need to try that method out.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

4498 posts in 2397 days


#2 posted 06-03-2020 04:12 PM

beautiful vessel and the top is a perfect contrast

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13395 posts in 3155 days


#3 posted 06-03-2020 04:31 PM

Nice work, beautiful.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4235 posts in 3727 days


#4 posted 06-03-2020 04:53 PM

Nice work, Nathan! I bet that was hard to give away.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

5408 posts in 1357 days


#5 posted 06-03-2020 05:49 PM

That came out dang pretty, Nathan. Good work on a piece of scrap wood!

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View duckmilk's profile

duckmilk

4185 posts in 2100 days


#6 posted 06-03-2020 06:21 PM

I like the look of the vase, and the finish shows the pattern off well. The contrasting top really … well … tops it off!

-- "Duck and Bob would be out doin some farming with funny hats on." chrisstef

View Lazyman's profile (online now)

Lazyman

5431 posts in 2163 days


#7 posted 06-03-2020 06:30 PM

Thanks guys. And yes Brandon, it was actually a little tough to give away but I give away most things I turn so it was inevitable — just not so soon after finishing it.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3736 posts in 3123 days


#8 posted 06-03-2020 06:42 PM

Now I know who to talk to about turning (once I get a lathe) and cool finishes to help out boring grain. And to think, that was probably destined for someone’s firepit.

Very nice work!!!

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Lazyman's profile (online now)

Lazyman

5431 posts in 2163 days


#9 posted 06-03-2020 07:21 PM

Thanks Earl. I’m still learning. In fact, it seems like I usually try something new on most of the things I turn. Definitely check out the 2DYE4 link in the OP for more info on the finishing technique I tried on this one and while you are at it, look through Trifern’s portfolio of projects. He’s done some pretty impressive things with that technique.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View toyguy's profile

toyguy

1735 posts in 4612 days


#10 posted 06-03-2020 07:25 PM

nice..

-- Brian, Ontario Canada,

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

24799 posts in 3881 days


#11 posted 06-04-2020 12:05 PM

That is a beautiful hollow form. I love the wood grain!! I have heard of Bradford pear but have not been able to find any .

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

9476 posts in 2818 days


#12 posted 06-04-2020 12:58 PM

That’s one beautiful piece of Braford pear. I had many logs atone time and they were always a surprise when turning. Nice work.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View Lazyman's profile (online now)

Lazyman

5431 posts in 2163 days


#13 posted 06-04-2020 01:57 PM

Thanks Dave and Jim.

Jim, It is also known as Callery pear (Pyrus calleryana) and around here is has been way over planted in people’s yards. It was planted because it has a short burst of white flowers in the spring and can actually have some nice fall color too. I consider it a trash tree (my forestry degree talking). The clones that all of the nurseries sold 25-30 years ago all have a fatal flaw. It branches in such a way that they all eventually lose large branches during heavy winds or ice and snow. That is good for me because it gives me a constant supply. It turns beautifully. One cool thing is that the bark stays on well too if you like to do live edge bowls and you can actually turn, sand and finish the bark for some interesting patterns. Check out my liquid wood project to see an example of the bark. Zoom the images to see a close up of the first image. Those brown patterns on the top 2 rippled bowls is bark.

Click for details

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

7570 posts in 1488 days


#14 posted 06-04-2020 02:18 PM

simply a very beautiful work of art GREAT JOB :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Lazyman's profile (online now)

Lazyman

5431 posts in 2163 days


#15 posted 06-04-2020 02:21 PM

Thanks Tony.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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