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Large Wormy Cherry Bowl

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Project by JoeinDE posted 05-19-2020 06:08 PM 693 views 1 time favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My neighbor had a cherry tree taken down in his back yard. I asked if I could have some of the wood and after drying it in my garage for three months, I have now turned seven or eight bowls from it. This is the largest, although there will be a larger on coming later. My lathe can handle 16” diameter and to date I have only turned one bowl that size.

This is 12” diameter and 4” tall. I left a good amount of mass in the bottom for stability. I could have made this deeper, but chose not to. The cherry was wet-sanded to 600 grit and finished with butcher block finish (mineral oil and bees wax). The holes were filled with gorilla glue, which I won’t do again. I don’t like the look of the dried glue. I’ll use either wood glue or epoxy from now on.

This was sent to my cousin and his wife as a wedding gift.

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/JMsWoodCreations





5 comments so far

View socrbent's profile

socrbent

1051 posts in 3765 days


#1 posted 05-19-2020 06:43 PM

Nice Cherry bowl. Suggestion: I have found that epoxy colored with lamp black artist watercolor from Hobby Lobby works well with cherry and other woods. Tiny amounts of the paint makes the epoxy look uniformly black.

-- socrbent Ohio

View JoeinDE's profile

JoeinDE

450 posts in 4819 days


#2 posted 05-19-2020 07:36 PM



Nice Cherry bowl. Suggestion: I have found that epoxy colored with lamp black artist watercolor from Hobby Lobby works well with cherry and other woods. Tiny amounts of the paint makes the epoxy look uniformly black.

- socrbent


Thanks for the suggestion. I’ve used two-part clear epoxy on the inside of many things that I want to hold water, but I’m not worried about the color there. I’ve also seen some light blue dyed epoxy with cherry that also looks really nice.

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/JMsWoodCreations

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

10225 posts in 2069 days


#3 posted 05-19-2020 11:16 PM

I love that “bad” wood. I say embrace the imperfections.

Killer bowl.

-- Think safe, be safe

View LesB's profile

LesB

3506 posts in 4938 days


#4 posted 05-20-2020 04:49 PM

Looks great.

I have had good results using medium or thick CA glue on small cracks and holes. The medium and thick take longer to set up and therefore it will seep down into the openings. It may take a couple of hours for them to set up completely in deep or wide holes. You can use an accelerant to quick cure the surface so it doesn’t run out.
I find this much easier than using epoxy and get similar results.

On larger voids and cracks I first pack them with fine sawdust collected with a belt sander or orbital sander that has a dust collector built in. Then I use thin CA glue to presoak the sawdust followed IMMEDIATELY by medium CA glue. The thin glue acts as a wicking agent for the thicker glue. You can use matching colored sawdust or contrasting. If you have voids or chipping while turning it can be touched up with more glue. I keep a collect sawdust from various woods in small containers so I have them when I need them. There are also some colored CA glues available if you want to accent the feature.

-- Les B, Oregon

View JoeinDE's profile

JoeinDE

450 posts in 4819 days


#5 posted 05-21-2020 01:41 PM



Looks great.

I have had good results using medium or thick CA glue on small cracks and holes. The medium and thick take longer to set up and therefore it will seep down into the openings. It may take a couple of hours for them to set up completely in deep or wide holes. You can use an accelerant to quick cure the surface so it doesn t run out.
I find this much easier than using epoxy and get similar results.

On larger voids and cracks I first pack them with fine sawdust collected with a belt sander or orbital sander that has a dust collector built in. Then I use thin CA glue to presoak the sawdust followed IMMEDIATELY by medium CA glue. The thin glue acts as a wicking agent for the thicker glue. You can use matching colored sawdust or contrasting. If you have voids or chipping while turning it can be touched up with more glue. I keep a collect sawdust from various woods in small containers so I have them when I need them. There are also some colored CA glues available if you want to accent the feature.

- LesB

Thanks for the tips. I do the same with fine sawdust for filling gaps in end-grain cutting boards.

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/JMsWoodCreations

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