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Cherry and Ash Stool with scooped seat

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Project by Andrew Nemeth posted 04-11-2020 01:02 PM 825 views 3 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here is a recently completed four legged stool with a scooped seat. Cherry seat, ash legs and stretchers, and accented with walnut wedges. Finished with urethane/BLO/OMS, wiped on, and top-coated with paste wax. This is my first attempted at scooping/saddling a seat and the first time I have used turned tapered tenons and matching mortises. The design is loosely based on Fabian Fischer’s stool featured in the September/October 2016 issue of Fine Woodworking magazine.

All comments and critiques are appreciated.





11 comments so far

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

8251 posts in 1678 days


#1 posted 04-11-2020 03:05 PM

GR8 wood choices on this beautiful stool love the walnut wedges GREAT JOB :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

View observer100's profile

observer100

476 posts in 2076 days


#2 posted 04-11-2020 06:13 PM

Very attractive looking project!

-- Seeing is believing.

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

1798 posts in 2076 days


#3 posted 04-11-2020 08:35 PM

I personally think it is superb.
Very nice work.
Did you shape (scoop) the seat by hand?
Kind Regards
anthm

-- There is no hope for any of us if we keep apologizing for telling the truth.

View Andrew Nemeth's profile

Andrew Nemeth

6 posts in 2769 days


#4 posted 04-11-2020 08:54 PM

Thank you all for the comments!

Anthm, I did a majority of the sculpting of the concave surface with a cutzall disk in an angle grinder, followed by a flap disk and a gooseneck cardscraper, and finally sanded with a ROS and then by hand. The convex curves were sculpted with a bench plane, followed by a spokshave, and then sanded with a ROS and then by hand.

I’m seriously looking at a travisher, scorp or other drawknife for future scooping/saddling. The cutzall was easy to use, and fast, but it generates so much dust and is loud. I think I’d much prefer getting set up with the right hand tools for future seats.

View swirt's profile

swirt

5838 posts in 3938 days


#5 posted 04-12-2020 03:04 AM

Beautiful stool. Nice color combos and good looking joinery.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View putty's profile

putty

1300 posts in 2572 days


#6 posted 04-12-2020 01:24 PM

Very Nice!
what angle did you splay the legs at?

-- Putty

View Dave Polaschek's profile (online now)

Dave Polaschek

6628 posts in 1548 days


#7 posted 04-12-2020 04:59 PM

That’s a good looking stool! Nicely done!

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Andrew Nemeth's profile

Andrew Nemeth

6 posts in 2769 days


#8 posted 04-12-2020 05:00 PM

Thank you putty and swirt!

Putty, the front legs ended up splayed about 10deg. with 7deg. rake. and the rear legs ended up splayed about 8deg with 7deg rake. Some of my measurements ended up quite different from Fabian Fischer’s stool from fine woodworking which listed the front legs as 8deg. splay with 12 deg. rake and the rear legs as 6deg. splay with 15deg rake. I originally drilled and reamed at his angles but the rear legs looked to vertical when viewed from front or back and both sets of legs looked too spread out when viewed from the sides. I’m no expert, so I was just using Fischer’s numbers without thought. However, once I stuck the legs into the mortises and looked at it, it just didn’t look right to my eyes. Fortunately, since I tapered all of my mortises, and I had extra length on each leg to extend my tenons so they would be longer (and wider), I was able to just ream out the holes while adjusting the splay and rake of each hole until the geometry looked right. Fischer’s article implies you can make a taller or shorter stool using the same geometry for the legs by simply lengthening the legs. However, I suspect the geometry given would look best on a shorter stool (in the article it looks like he is building a mid height stool). As I was building a tall stool with a seat height of 25”, the original geometry just didn’t do it for me. Maybe someone with more experience building different height stools can chime in and let us know if they change the geometry of their legs based on different height stools or if the just keep the geometry the same and simply extend the legs.

View aurora's profile

aurora

238 posts in 4218 days


#9 posted 04-14-2020 08:35 PM

a beautiful piece of art! nice build

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

26793 posts in 4817 days


#10 posted 04-15-2020 03:30 AM

Nice job and congratulations on your ‘Daily Top 3’ award.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View Andrew Nemeth's profile

Andrew Nemeth

6 posts in 2769 days


#11 posted 04-19-2020 03:11 PM

Thank you aurora and Grumpy!

Grumpy, if you don’t mind me asking, what is a ‘Daily Top 3’ award? I’m kind of new to the LJ community and am just learning the ins and outs.

Thanks Again!

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