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Mini bench

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Project by Brett posted 03-28-2020 11:30 PM 1867 views 5 times favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I built a mini bench, following the article in Fine Woodworking by Steve Latta.

The benchtop is southern yellow pine, same as my main workbench. I found it difficult to drill an accurate hole by hand in southern yellow pine for the dowels used to keep the front of the legs and the front of the top in line, so I used pocket screws instead.

It’s interesting to see how much my main workbench has darkened since I built it 7 years ago. Look at these pictures, and compare them with my previous Ruobo bench project.

I had kept my hand planes on a shelf at the bottom of the pegboard, but I couldn’t reach them with the minibench positioned in the back right corner of my main bench (as shown in the second picture) . So I removed the shelf and now I am keeping my planes on the minibench. I have a small shop and i think this is a good compromise.

-- More tools, fewer machines.





3 comments so far

View swirt's profile

swirt

7795 posts in 4469 days


#1 posted 03-29-2020 01:53 AM

NIce addition to the bench.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

10247 posts in 2072 days


#2 posted 03-29-2020 03:02 AM

Your mini makes a fabulous shelf, and if pressed for height advantage you can always swing it into action. I’m liking these morphed Moxon’s, they can fill a lot of gaps in a regular bench.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Brett's profile

Brett

693 posts in 4180 days


#3 posted 03-29-2020 12:06 PM



Your mini makes a fabulous shelf, and if pressed for height advantage you can always swing it into action. I m liking these morphed Moxon s, they can fill a lot of gaps in a regular bench.

- therealSteveN


Thanks. I already have a traditional Moxon, but if I didn’t, I’d probably have made a morphed Moxon, too. On the other hand, I like the fact that my traditional Moxon and this minibench are at different heights (7 and 12 inches), which might be useful for different operations.

-- More tools, fewer machines.

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