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Wooden Urns

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Project by WoodenDreams posted 03-28-2020 09:46 PM 446 views 1 time favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Made more to add to my inventory. Hickory, red oak, Mahogany and pine. All have locking miter joints and are top loading instead of the normal bottom loading. I include a small bottle of glue to seal the lid closed in each one. I put Titebond I into smaller bottles with instructions to a put a bead of glue into the channel and place the lid back on.





8 comments so far

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

24536 posts in 3838 days


#1 posted 03-28-2020 11:02 PM

Nice urns!!

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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a1Jim

118047 posts in 4310 days


#2 posted 03-28-2020 11:42 PM

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

1032 posts in 644 days


#3 posted 03-29-2020 02:46 AM

The funeral homes I deal with prefer red oak and the hickory urns with a routered accent over a straight cut accent. More visually appealing to sell. One funeral home gave me a plastic box that they put the bag of ashes in. So all the urns he orders, his containers must fit inside. But individuals that call me for a urn like the option of a larger choice to choose from. Some customers don’t want to turn them upside down and deal with the screws.

View Laughran's profile

Laughran

85 posts in 2661 days


#4 posted 03-29-2020 12:39 PM

Good timing. I was just asked by my sister to build an urn for my nephew and have been looking for ideas.
I have a question, by glueing the top and bottom on do you risk cracking from expansion and contraction?
Do they have to be sealed? I have been trying to figure out how this is done and have not found any information
regarding this.
Any tips would be appreciated.
Thanks
David

-- David

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

1032 posts in 644 days


#5 posted 03-29-2020 08:02 PM

The width is only about 6 to 7 inches, depending on the size made. not enough to worry about expansion. If final resting place is a cemetary, most cemetaries a have a policy to have urns buried in a vault.

The standard is 200cubic inches for inside measurement. Averaging 7”x7”x8 1/2” using 3/4” for top sides and bottom. For speed, Urn manufactures cut the miter joint on the table saw, cut a rabbit on one side of the board (for the bottom), then glue the sides together. Cut out a top piece slightly larger than the box, glue the top on, sand the sides to where the top is smooth with all side, then router the top edges to the shape desired. Spray finish. Cut the bottom piece (usually Masonite) to fit the rabbited section on the bottom, place in the bottom, drill in holes for the four screws to attach the bottom. That’s the production line method (precut slap it together).

View Jake229's profile

Jake229

22 posts in 135 days


#6 posted 03-29-2020 09:58 PM

Very nice! Have 3 to make for our angel greyhounds. Want to find nice plates for their names. Thanks for sharing!

-- Be safe out there

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WoodenDreams

1032 posts in 644 days


#7 posted 03-30-2020 01:42 AM

I use a local trophy shop for name plates. You can choose the size, style of name plate, type of coated finish (nickel, brass or antique), choice font type. They also predrill the corner holes if needed at no additional charge. From $7 to $10.

View Laughran's profile

Laughran

85 posts in 2661 days


#8 posted 03-31-2020 10:17 AM

Thanks for sharing, this helps alot

-- David

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