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Kumiko Angle and Thickness Jigs

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Project by DreganTepis posted 02-25-2020 04:12 PM 1078 views 9 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I wanted to learn Kumiko, so it is high time I made the necessary tools!

Angle jigs are cut at 45, 22.5, 67.5, and a bunch of 90s! The jigs are double sided, so I can cut other angles if needed for more complex patterns in the future. Steel threaded inserts and aluminum stops to adjust length. Finished in monocoat pure.

The thickness sled is unfinished, because I wanted to try it out first. The bed is made of 3 – 3/4” flatsawn oak pieces turned on their side and glued together to make a laminated quatersawn base. This gives me a capacity of 2-1/4” by 28”. Wings were rabbited to the same width as the plane, and matched the dept of the bed. Attached with two stainless insert per side. Front stop is adjustable and replaceable. Thickness is determined by placing material under the wing of the desired thickness and tightening the screws. This can also be used for non-parallel shapes, such as chopsticks and wedges, by using different thicknesses front to back or side to side. I can achieve very accurate dimensions with this!

Last pic is my first attempt… A pattern called “Asa no ha”. It’s going much better than I thought!

For anyone wondering why I wanted to get into Kumiko; My next big project will be an entertainment center, and it will need airflow for the electronics. Instead of metal or plastic vent inserts, I decided to make airflow part of the aesthetics. I will be using a series of these patterns in a frames to make an alternative to a raised panel door for the cabinet.

-- Red pencil, red marker, marking knife... doesn't mater, the wood will end up the same color.





8 comments so far

View mafe's profile

mafe

12507 posts in 3765 days


#1 posted 02-25-2020 05:29 PM

Nice, I never saw how this was made before, just watched a handful of videos.
Fine jigs.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- MAD F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

1697 posts in 2625 days


#2 posted 02-25-2020 08:29 PM

Dregan, I don’t know the art form. I do think the finished product is really cool. Those jigs are fantastic. Perhaps I should make a thickness jig for splines? Looking forward to new work from you.

-- Petey

View DreganTepis's profile

DreganTepis

82 posts in 1187 days


#3 posted 02-25-2020 08:34 PM



Dregan, I don t know the art form. I do think the finished product is really cool. Those jigs are fantastic. Perhaps I should make a thickness jig for splines? Looking forward to new work from you.

- Peteybadboy

Thank you sir! Yes, it would be great for getting an exact thickness for miter splines, and you could get away with a much shorter bed since you wont need cabinet-door size pieces!

-- Red pencil, red marker, marking knife... doesn't mater, the wood will end up the same color.

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2854 posts in 2866 days


#4 posted 02-25-2020 10:49 PM

Pretty handy thin strip jig, can be used for a lot of applications. I see you gauge the material final thickness by setting the side rails with shims, slick. I think I’ve got to make one of these, to create small box partitions.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4516 posts in 2664 days


#5 posted 02-25-2020 11:26 PM

Very interesting and unique.

View swirt's profile

swirt

4921 posts in 3648 days


#6 posted 02-26-2020 02:52 AM

Very clever jigs. Nicely done. Good luck with your adventure.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

3613 posts in 2844 days


#7 posted 02-26-2020 07:15 AM

Very nice. I hoppe we will see more from this.

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View Kcmwoodworks's profile

Kcmwoodworks

8 posts in 49 days


#8 posted 02-28-2020 01:57 AM

once You start it’s hard to stop I have a stack of different jigs the hard part is figuring which patterns to use. Enjoy the journey. Be sure to post picks of the finished project.

-- KCM

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