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New Casting Process For Epoxy Hybrid Mugs

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Project by Jpaynewoodworking posted 02-10-2020 10:22 PM 760 views 1 time favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I thought for a while on a new way to make these wood epoxy hybrid mugs. The process that is called for by the instructions is uses for a solid wood shell. This involves boring out the center of the blank with a large bit and then inserting and gluing into place the steel insert from the kit. I did not like this process for making the epoxy hybrid mugs as it was time consuming and also there is a good bit of epoxy wasted to pour the blank and then just cut away the center. So I came up with a new process to make the mugs and cast the insert straight into the blank and turn away the excess. Below is a link to the article showing the new process. What do you guys think? What else could be cast this way? Let me know. In the comments.

https://jpaynewoodworking.com/making-an-epoxy-travel-mug-the-new-way/

-- Jeremy, Jpayne Woodworking ,jpaynewoodworking.com @jpaynewoodworking instagram and Youtube





9 comments so far

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2784 posts in 1407 days


#1 posted 02-11-2020 12:05 AM

Wait! What did I miss? Does the stainless steel cup go inside of the PVC then you stuff the wood around the sides and the bottom?? It looks like you just filled the PVC with wood chips.

What is that ring made of? Does that seal against the PVC? Inquiring minds want to know.

EDIT – I just read your article. Should have done that first I guess. I guess I need to create a ring (without a CNC) that is a snug fit on the rim of the mug??

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Jpaynewoodworking's profile

Jpaynewoodworking

31 posts in 588 days


#2 posted 02-11-2020 12:16 AM

Yes the ring is used to position the insert centered into the pvc mold I didn’t go into detail on this process yet as i want to figure out a way to make the ring maybe reusable before I go into detail about them. This one was made of scrap mdf and is turned away on the lathe.

-- Jeremy, Jpayne Woodworking ,jpaynewoodworking.com @jpaynewoodworking instagram and Youtube

View swirt's profile

swirt

5321 posts in 3775 days


#3 posted 02-11-2020 02:07 AM

That is a nice method you’ve come up with there. Saves a bunch of epoxy ($$).

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Jpaynewoodworking's profile

Jpaynewoodworking

31 posts in 588 days


#4 posted 02-11-2020 02:08 AM

yes it does one of the great benifits


That is a nice method you ve come up with there. Saves a bunch of epoxy ($$).

- swirt


-- Jeremy, Jpayne Woodworking ,jpaynewoodworking.com @jpaynewoodworking instagram and Youtube

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3860 posts in 2026 days


#5 posted 02-11-2020 04:55 PM

My first look had the same thoughts as Andy. Filling the PVC with epoxy then cutting away the center so you could slip in the cup (basically what you are trying to avoid 8^)

I can see how important centering in the pvc mold is unless you use some form of centering tenon as the lathe chuck (which you appear to do). I would guess you could make the ring reusable if you give it a healthy coating of wax before installing. It would be even better if the MDF was replaced with something like hdpe plastic or other somewhat flexible material.

View Jpaynewoodworking's profile

Jpaynewoodworking

31 posts in 588 days


#6 posted 02-11-2020 05:10 PM

Yes I want to design and make some silicone rings it’s just getting me perfect as well as strong enough for repeated use.


My first look had the same thoughts as Andy. Filling the PVC with epoxy then cutting away the center so you could slip in the cup (basically what you are trying to avoid 8^)

I can see how important centering in the pvc mold is unless you use some form of centering tenon as the lathe chuck (which you appear to do). I would guess you could make the ring reusable if you give it a healthy coating of wax before installing. It would be even better if the MDF was replaced with something like hdpe plastic or other somewhat flexible material.

- splintergroup


-- Jeremy, Jpayne Woodworking ,jpaynewoodworking.com @jpaynewoodworking instagram and Youtube

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

6553 posts in 3070 days


#7 posted 02-11-2020 07:00 PM

I reallylike what that turned out like, Great Job!

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2784 posts in 1407 days


#8 posted 02-11-2020 07:51 PM


Yes I want to design and make some silicone rings it s just getting me perfect as well as strong enough for repeated use.

My first look had the same thoughts as Andy. Filling the PVC with epoxy then cutting away the center so you could slip in the cup (basically what you are trying to avoid 8^)

I can see how important centering in the pvc mold is unless you use some form of centering tenon as the lathe chuck (which you appear to do). I would guess you could make the ring reusable if you give it a healthy coating of wax before installing. It would be even better if the MDF was replaced with something like hdpe plastic or other somewhat flexible material.

- splintergroup

- Jpaynewoodworking

I’m thinking an HDPE cutting board but without a CNC it’s gonna be tough tot get it exact. Anybody got any ideas? Maybe use a bandsaw circle cutting jig and a hose clamp to keep it tight once you get the size right?

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3860 posts in 2026 days


#9 posted 02-11-2020 07:53 PM

You know, having continuous issues with the fool toilets in this house, I spend an inordinate amount of time in the plumbing repair parts aisle. Lots of larger diameter flange gaskets, rings, widgets, etc. made with rubber and/or silicone (stretchable).

Might be worth a look next time you are in the hardware store.

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