LumberJocks

1958 My first project

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Project by ChuckJR posted 02-05-2020 10:20 PM 878 views 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

In 1958 I was a junior in high school.
I make my first project in the
Woodworking shop, at Barrington IL.
The shop was big, It comprised of
woodworking equipment & hand
tools, A complete machine shop,
foundry, sheet metal equipment &
welding equipment. By 1961 the
school board delete all the
industrial classes.





14 comments so far

View pottz's profile

pottz

8430 posts in 1663 days


#1 posted 02-05-2020 11:07 PM

yeah i had woodshop and metal shop in junior high mid 70’s and thats all gone now,real sad these kids are exposed to the trades anymore.
ps-almost forgot,welcome to lumber jocks hope you enjoy it here.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View ChuckJR's profile

ChuckJR

13 posts in 65 days


#2 posted 02-06-2020 12:00 AM

My grand kids come from school and starte playing the games.

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

625 posts in 333 days


#3 posted 02-06-2020 12:13 AM

We didn’t have either shop class in junior high but a semester of each was required as freshman in high school. Our high school shop even incorporated AutoCAD if you kept with it. By the time i was a senior you could do your own plans, print them out on a plotter and take them to the shop. We even had competitions you could enter for metal, wood, or drafting with all the area schools. I graduated in 98 and the programs were still going strong. I went to high school by Wichita, KS where aviation factory work used to be a big deal so that’s my guess why we had such strong programs.

Anyway enough about memory lane. Welcome to LJs!

View Rich1955's profile

Rich1955

93 posts in 69 days


#4 posted 02-06-2020 12:40 AM

We are fortunate to still have wood shop and automotive shop at our high school. Not to many school dist. have them anymore. There is a need for these classes because not everyone wants to go to college and create a huge debt. There is such a need for people to get into the trades.

-- Rich

View pottz's profile

pottz

8430 posts in 1663 days


#5 posted 02-06-2020 12:55 AM



We are fortunate to still have wood shop and automotive shop at our high school. Not to many school dist. have them anymore. There is a need for these classes because not everyone wants to go to college and create a huge debt. There is such a need for people to get into the trades.

- Rich1955

good point because from what ive read there is a huge shortage of workers in fabrication shops and metal working that can pay up to 100g a year with the right skills but the kids today arnt exposed to the trades in school anymore so they dont pursue those jobs thinking their low paying menial work.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1603 posts in 2315 days


#6 posted 02-06-2020 04:13 PM

Jr. High was my introduction to wood-shop. I had a wonderful teacher, Mr. Tyndal, who was very patient with us. It was by far the best memory I have of school. The smells, the sounds, the textures are a memory that is precious to me. I was broken-hearted when my oldest child reached Jr. High and I learned that the program was gone and our shop was converted into a library. I immediately went and found the principal to find out why this had happened. Mr. Tyndal had retired and they could not find a teacher to replace him. What a HUGE loss.
Kids learn so much from working with their hands.

-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

625 posts in 333 days


#7 posted 02-06-2020 04:24 PM



good point because from what ive read there is a huge shortage of workers in fabrication shops and metal working that can pay up to 100g a year with the right skills but the kids today arnt exposed to the trades in school anymore so they dont pursue those jobs thinking their low paying menial work.

- pottz

Educators themselves are more to blame for this than anything else. My brother and I both wish we hadn’t gone to college and gone into a trade. We wasted years and money just trying to figure out what we wanted to do. But from junior high on you’re basically told if you dont go to college you’re going to be a failure.

Which is total BS. Anyone who can think on their own and problem solve will make a fine living as a skilled tradesman. My brother at least graduated college…i quit when i was teaching professors how to write code. Both of us are still paying back the money borrowed to end up in careers we dont much care for but they pay really well so it is what it is.

View pottz's profile

pottz

8430 posts in 1663 days


#8 posted 02-06-2020 04:51 PM

i guess i was stupid enough to realize i didn’t know what i wanted do and didn’t waste the time and money,ended up in the construction supply industry,making pretty good money inspite of being told like you were, if you dont go to collage you’ll be digging ditches.funny how i make more than some of the ones that went.kinda tiered of the business myself but the woodworking fills my soul.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3442 posts in 1901 days


#9 posted 02-06-2020 06:09 PM

Great memories!

Our junior HS (grades 7-9) had booth wood and metal/trades shop I took all I could schedule.

Some memories (this is the mid 70’s) include having to pay $1.25/bf for walnut and $0.50/bf for Honduran mahogany. Only other wood available was pine.

View pottz's profile

pottz

8430 posts in 1663 days


#10 posted 02-06-2020 07:18 PM

i only took one semester of wood shop though,i had better tools at home and the teacher only let the “adavanced” students use the major power tools like the tablesaw and bandsaw,i was using those since i was about 12 so i went into the metal shop where the teacher let us use everything from lathes to welders to the forge.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View metolius's profile

metolius

137 posts in 1409 days


#11 posted 02-06-2020 07:59 PM

I am very happy that my son’s middle school still runs shop class for 7-8 grades.

The equipment is ok. Good benches with old wilton vises; professional dust collection with an outdoor cyclone. Plus some tech such as 3D printers and simple CAD. The kids are permitted to use the drill press and belt sanders and hand tools at will. The table saw, bandsaws, and lathes require supervision.

A term goes through a pair of defined projects and free time for a personal make. This year, their main project is a car with a rubber band driven axle. Given a set of wheels, a rubber band and pine, they are graded on how many feet they can get it to go.

Not all local middle schools have a shop. That’s sad.

-- derek / oregon

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

4337 posts in 2656 days


#12 posted 02-06-2020 09:23 PM

I was lucky to have school in the early 1970’s. We had what they called industrial arts in middle school. First quarter was mechanical drawing. Then this was used to design your wood work projects in the second quarter. Third was a quarter of leathercraft. Also a quarter of home economics where we learned to cook. It was great to be exposed to so many skills. The wood shop had table and band saws, lathe, planes fully equipt. I don’t recall any incidents either.

Welcome to lumberjocks and that’s a nice bowl.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View pottz's profile

pottz

8430 posts in 1663 days


#13 posted 02-06-2020 11:10 PM

mine was very similar,i quarter of drafting then electrical,wood shop then metal shop.electric shop had a ham radio and they would talk to guys all over the world,but the old guy that taught it wouldn’t let you use it unless you learned (morse code) he said companies were dying trying to find guys that knew it-lol.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View plang's profile

plang

124 posts in 4033 days


#14 posted 02-09-2020 05:06 AM

My wife and I live near Dallas and we have one of our grandsons living with us. His high school offers only a welding class which he has taken some interest in. It is very upsetting that our school system has deleted those wonderful industrial classes. I took one year of woodworking in high school and have some good memories of this class. Because of this class I was able to turn some of the knowledge and love of working with tools that I started to woodworking as a wonderful hobby and have enjoyed it for the past 25 years. If you have any schools in your area that offer any industrial art classes, take a moment to let such teachers know how much appreciate what they do. If only one student goes through his or her class and goes on to have a career that teacher has succeeded.

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