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First attempt at making a cutting board

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Project by Chris S. posted 01-13-2020 04:10 PM 550 views 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
First attempt at making a cutting board
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This is the first attempt I’ve made at making a cutting board. I loosely followed directions as I remembered them from a Youtube video for making a Walnut, Cherry, and Maple brick pattern cutting board. I realized after I was already committed to finishing that I had oriented the board in wrong direction and also realized that I need to work on my glue up skills.

-- Chris S.





6 comments so far

View Andre's profile (online now)

Andre

4270 posts in 2811 days


#1 posted 01-13-2020 05:05 PM

Looks pretty good, how thick? Wood shades make a huge influence on the overall appearance.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View Chris S.'s profile

Chris S.

4 posts in 869 days


#2 posted 01-13-2020 06:43 PM

Thanks for being kind :) The end result was 1 1/4” thick and approximately 9” wide x 14” long

-- Chris S.

View AJ1104's profile

AJ1104

1238 posts in 2664 days


#3 posted 01-14-2020 02:01 AM

Great job. Warning: These boards can be addicting!

-- AJ

View ScottinVa's profile

ScottinVa

44 posts in 2520 days


#4 posted 01-14-2020 01:57 PM

Hope you enjoyed the process and thanks for posting. Mistakes are part of it – I just made one of the best boards of my life, after immediately trashing an attempt where I did not do the layout correctly.

I don’t think I’ve seen this style of board in a long grain exposed setup. I always thought part of that was due to conflicting grain directions.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

7214 posts in 1579 days


#5 posted 01-14-2020 06:17 PM

Nice looking face board. Though I think through a year long cycle you will see some joint lines not staying together. So many end grain joins usually don’t fare too well, especially if your environment sees seasonal movement in wood. It’s never a given, but if there is breakage it will start where end grain is joined to anything. It’s a weaker connection, sometimes problematic.

Consider it a learning tool. Woodworking is pretty simple, and the parts you don’t pick up right away will usually point themselves out to you as you go along. Keep making, and soon this will be the blueprint for greatness.

The fact that you chased what many would have thought to be too complex, tells me this.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Chris S.'s profile

Chris S.

4 posts in 869 days


#6 posted 01-14-2020 07:17 PM

Thanks Steve, I hadn’t even thought about the walnut and maple being an end-grain glue up to the cherry in this board. I’ve read about that in some of the walk throughs I’ve found online and will keep an eye on the joints. I’m not too worried about this board surviving long term, I just wanted it to live long enough to survive me taking a picture of it as my first :)


Nice looking face board. Though I think through a year long cycle you will see some joint lines not staying together. So many end grain joins usually don t fare too well, especially if your environment sees seasonal movement in wood. It s never a given, but if there is breakage it will start where end grain is joined to anything. It s a weaker connection, sometimes problematic.

Consider it a learning tool. Woodworking is pretty simple, and the parts you don t pick up right away will usually point themselves out to you as you go along. Keep making, and soon this will be the blueprint for greatness.

The fact that you chased what many would have thought to be too complex, tells me this.

- therealSteveN


-- Chris S.

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