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Anybody else glue together all their scraps this Christmas and call it a gift?

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Project by Jeremymcon posted 12-27-2019 04:08 AM 1643 views 2 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I save all the scrap I generate from cutting board appropriate woods, and usually once a year make done end grain cutting boards if I haven’t found a better use for the stuff. This year I made a maple workbench top, and a walnut dresser with maple drawer sides, so lots of good scrap!

Not having a decent router or router table my preferred edge treatment has been a simple under bevel, which I still really like! Accomplished on the bandsaw and cleaned up with a handplane

As always these are “triple sanded” – wet and knock back the raised grain a few times with 1k grit until the grain doesn’t raise anymore. This technique is the secret to making good kitchen implements, in my opinion.





14 comments so far

View John's profile

John

1840 posts in 2080 days


#1 posted 12-27-2019 04:26 AM

They look awesome and I like the under bevel as well!

-- John, Sunshine Coast, BC, Canada.

View ScooterG's profile

ScooterG

29 posts in 463 days


#2 posted 12-27-2019 05:30 AM

Job well done. Great contrasting woods. I also built about 7 boards for Christmas, however, even though it was recommended to place them in water to raise the grain and then sand again, they looked so nice and it was so close to Christmas, I did not. I may be regretting that later on…..but yours look awesome.

-- Scooter G Designs

View Ivan's profile

Ivan

16097 posts in 3677 days


#3 posted 12-27-2019 05:32 AM

Beautiful irregular pattern!

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

4594 posts in 2432 days


#4 posted 12-27-2019 03:51 PM

I always glue up my scrap pieces but have yet to get anything as nice as these – thanks for sharing

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

5972 posts in 1384 days


#5 posted 12-27-2019 04:21 PM

Awesome looking scrap pile.

-- Think safe, be safe

View leec's profile

leec

22 posts in 1453 days


#6 posted 12-27-2019 10:40 PM

Been there, done that with my scraps, too! Coasters, cutting board, jewelry box.

-- Lee, Framingham, MA

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

414 posts in 1490 days


#7 posted 12-27-2019 11:11 PM

Nice! Like the coasters and the box in particular.


Been there, done that with my scraps, too! Coasters, cutting board, jewelry box.

- leec


View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

414 posts in 1490 days


#8 posted 12-27-2019 11:13 PM


I always glue up my scrap pieces but have yet to get anything as nice as these – thanks for sharing

- recycle1943

Thanks! But those segmented bowls are pretty sweet, if they’re made from scraps.

View Keith Hastings's profile

Keith Hastings

163 posts in 628 days


#9 posted 12-27-2019 11:29 PM

Great idea for getting rid of your scrap wood.

-- Keith

View AM420's profile

AM420

292 posts in 1193 days


#10 posted 12-28-2019 02:27 PM

I did the same for a gift exchange, but my scrap was a big piece of cutoff from my new cherry kitchen countertops, so it made the job a lot easier, but look a little boring with only one old type It was my first time adding a juice groove and finger slots on the side, which got a little off. ’m making a few more from the cutoff for a charity auction in a couple of months.

I’ve never heard of using up to 1k grit for a cutting board, does that help to keep the grain from continuing to raise? How many times does it usually take before the grain stops raising?

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

414 posts in 1490 days


#11 posted 12-28-2019 10:28 PM

The juice groove is a nice addition. I don’t really have a router setup, and I don’t think have the skill to add one by hand, so I never tried to add one. The 1k grit was mostly for the Walnut to keep the grain from raising. The maple would be plenty smooth with like 320 or 500 grit and probably just one or two sandings, but walnut likes to fuzz up. It takes 3 wettings and knocking back with 1k grit. I also just like feel of the board after the fine grit paper.

View AJ1104's profile

AJ1104

1107 posts in 2469 days


#12 posted 12-29-2019 09:42 PM

Great job on your cutting board gifts. Never mention scrap, they are made from prized select pieces! An overall perfect gift. Thanks for sharing!

-- AJ

View ScottinVa's profile

ScottinVa

44 posts in 2325 days


#13 posted 01-14-2020 01:38 PM

Nice board thanks for posting. I will consider that bevel edge for my own. How do you sand? I use a drum sander but haven’t gone close to 1k.

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

414 posts in 1490 days


#14 posted 01-14-2020 10:33 PM

Well I actually run the boards through my lunchbox planer with sacrificial backer glued on. So sanding isn’t as bad as it could be if I were starting from glue squeeze out. Up to 220 with a random orbit sander, then a quick 500 grit sanding by hand. Then when I wet the boards I knock back the raised grain with 1k by hand. 1k sounds like a lot of work but it really doesn’t take much hand sanding to knock back the fuzz. Raise the grain until it stops raising when wet – usually 3 times.

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