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Lamp

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Project by leftcoaster posted 11-19-2019 11:42 PM 771 views 3 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Lamp, made in a workshop taught by Jay van Arsdale.

Lamp is cherry. The Asa No Ha kumiko is made with basswood using the jigs designed by Mike P in FWW. The top is a piece of black bamboo. Some interesting fasteners.

Stock is machine milled and joinery is hand cut. No glue for the panels or kumiko.

The paper is Warlon – PVC faced washi paper that is tough and washable.

The paper has the same pattern as the kumiko.

This was my first project with curves- challenging! I did get a new curve bottom Japanese plane though. :-)





14 comments so far

View SteveMI's profile

SteveMI

1147 posts in 3856 days


#1 posted 11-20-2019 12:45 AM

I like this a lot. Never knew there was black bamboo.
Is there a wattage or type of bulb that is needed with PVC faced Washi paper?
Steve.

View leftcoaster's profile

leftcoaster

269 posts in 1438 days


#2 posted 11-20-2019 12:48 AM



I like this a lot. Never knew there was black bamboo.
Is there a wattage or type of bulb that is needed with PVC faced Washi paper?
Steve.

- SteveMI

Thanks Steve!

It’s an ordinary LED light bulb emitting no heat and so not a fire hazard.

View MrWolfe's profile

MrWolfe

472 posts in 685 days


#3 posted 11-20-2019 12:49 AM

Beautiful style and cool use of bamboo.
That kumiko is very cool. Can you post another pic detailing that?
Did you use pull saws and japanese tools for the handwork?
Great Lamp!!!
Jon

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

3676 posts in 3671 days


#4 posted 11-20-2019 12:54 AM

Very cool! Something made with kumiko is on my list of things to try.

-- Steven.......Random Orbital Nailer

View leftcoaster's profile

leftcoaster

269 posts in 1438 days


#5 posted 11-20-2019 01:13 AM


Beautiful style and cool use of bamboo.
That kumiko is very cool. Can you post another pic detailing that?

Sure, here’s a closeup, warts and all. This is compression fit, so no glue. the shoji frame is alternating lap joints with through tenons into the enclosing frame, which is finger jointed.

The outside frame is compression fit into a rabbet so that there is no light line around the frame. The outer parts of the frame are just a little thicker than the inner ones so that they appear the same thickness when the outer is partly concealed by the rabbet.

I cut the parts of the kumiko close to final shape with my Japanese dovetail saw (very fine crosscut). I then use a chisel to dial in the fit on jigs with the appropriate angles, as presented in FWW. They are basically shooting boards. You could also use a plane instead of chisels.


Did you use pull saws and japanese tools for the handwork?

Yes, only the milling was with power tools. For the roof panel, I resawed a 28” x 7” board by hand (workout! but I only have 4” resaw capacity on my bandsaw), book matched and laminated it, then cross cut it to make the two roof panels. They are planed slightly skewed to make them flex more easily when nailed to their curved supports.

Mortises are with Japanese chisels. Tenons I used one of my pull saws. I got the through tenons just right, so no need to flush trim.

I rough cut the curves on the bandsaw and planed them with a flat bodied Japanese plane. For the convex and flat surfaces I used regular kannas.

The form that supports the bamboo I made with the bandsaw. That’s the only thing I had to use sandpaper on—everything else is just planed. Properly sharpened Japanese planes leave a surface like glass!

Clear shellac is the finish


Great Lamp!!!

Thank you so much!

View leftcoaster's profile

leftcoaster

269 posts in 1438 days


#6 posted 11-20-2019 01:17 AM

By the way, if you look closely, you’ll see that the Warlon (paper) has the same pattern as the kumiko: asa no ha, or hemp.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4318 posts in 1136 days


#7 posted 11-20-2019 06:53 AM

Nice Japanese inspired lamp. Had you been influenced by, or practiced Japanese work prior to the class?

-- Think safe, be safe

View leftcoaster's profile

leftcoaster

269 posts in 1438 days


#8 posted 11-20-2019 10:25 AM



Nice Japanese inspired lamp. Had you been influenced by, or practiced Japanese work prior to the class?

- therealSteveN

Yes, I’ve been studying Japanese hand tools and joinery with Jay van Arsdale for a couple of years now. There is a lively community of likeminded folks in my area and also a national group called Kezurou-Kai USA.

Also in my area is Richard Wiborg, with whom I studied Chinese temple brackets – amazing person and very challenging craft: http://www.richardwiborg.com/Welcome.html

I really love the simple and pragmatic approach that this group has.

https://www.kezuroukai.us/

View swirt's profile

swirt

4394 posts in 3534 days


#9 posted 11-20-2019 02:21 PM

Wow. I really like the looks of that. Well done.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View stefang's profile

stefang

16862 posts in 3896 days


#10 posted 11-20-2019 09:41 PM

More like art with a lightbulb. Great Work!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Moron's profile

Moron

5043 posts in 4455 days


#11 posted 11-20-2019 10:38 PM

Black bamboo is obviously beautiful
Be careful if yr trying to grow it lol, makes dandelions look like saffron

Love the gentle curves of Japanese joinery and the simplistic virtues of how and why gentle curve changes everything into beautiful joinery

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Tom Regnier's profile

Tom Regnier

433 posts in 3109 days


#12 posted 11-21-2019 01:22 AM

Great looking piece…nice shape on the curves!

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

503 posts in 1854 days


#13 posted 11-21-2019 11:59 PM

That’s a great design. I looked up the web sights you posted. What great groups.
Where did you buy the PVC Washi paper and the lamp kit?

-- James E McIntyre

View leftcoaster's profile

leftcoaster

269 posts in 1438 days


#14 posted 11-22-2019 12:56 AM



That’s a great design. I looked up the web sights you posted. What great groups.
Where did you buy the PVC Washi paper and the lamp kit?

- James E McIntyre

Thanks James,

Yeah it really is a great group. At the last big event we had a group of blacksmiths join and they forged marking knives for people.

I actually used some Warlon paper Jay had but he gets it and the 1/8” double sided tape from someone in Oregon.

The lamp kit is from Ace Hardware – the one by me sells individual parts – socket, nipple, cross member, and plug/wire. I drilled a hole in a piece of stock to receive the wire and fed it up through the cross member and nipple to the socket. The cross member screws to the stock. The stock is mortised into the bottom part of the lamp body on two sides.

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