LumberJocks

Reclaimed Olivewood boxes

  • Advertise with us
Project by wildwoodbybrianjohns posted 11-04-2019 10:33 AM 956 views 2 times favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I bought two of these olivewood arched-ceiling beams awhile ago at a salvage yard, and I finally decided to make something out of them. They were roughly 1.5meters in length. These beams were hand-cut, not machined. I estimate that they are about 150 years old, the wood was very dry and the termites had come and gone long ago. I decided to keep the “live” edge and work with that as an elemental detail. It was quite a challenge to salvage enough material for these boxes due to the checking and termite damage, and also to match grain patterns as much as possible. I still have half of one beam material left.

Dimensions on the larger box are 23cm X 23cm, and the other is slightly smaller.
4mm brass pins are the hingeing mechanism, and I will trim them down some after finishing is done.
The inset compartment lid on the one box is held in place with R.E. magnets.
I will leave these raw as a finish and only use Linseed oil, depending on how much the wood wants to drink.
The liner is peel and stick velour, and is somewhat darker than in the photos.

Interior guts:

For this one, I will give credit to Andybb for the idea, although I was probably headed in this direction anyway, with carved interior elements, as opposed to the traditional tray-type compartments.

This interior is 100% my idea.

You may notice that the liners are buckled or ill-fitting, and that is because I tend to just lay them in without affixing them permanent, in case the buyer wants to change colour or material.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: The Big Bang: Nothing - exploded into Everything. Thanks to Nothing.





19 comments so far

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6013 posts in 1467 days


#1 posted 11-04-2019 11:51 AM

Fascinating wood, and some very interesting boxes. I would’ve been tempted to stabilize the wood before cutting it into pieces, but soaking it with linseed oil will get to a similar result. It’ll be interesting to hear how much it takes.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View hairy's profile

hairy

3121 posts in 4417 days


#2 posted 11-04-2019 01:15 PM

Very interesting boxes, nice work!!

-- Genghis Khan and his brother Don, couldn't keep on keeping on...

View BusterB's profile

BusterB

2298 posts in 2893 days


#3 posted 11-04-2019 02:10 PM

Nice work!!!

-- Buster, Ocoee TN (Critics are men who watch a battle from a high place then come down and shoot the survivors - Hemingway)

View swirt's profile

swirt

5577 posts in 3857 days


#4 posted 11-04-2019 02:39 PM

Amazing wood. I really like what you did using the wood inside the box to make the natural looking dividers.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View MrWolfe's profile

MrWolfe

1158 posts in 1008 days


#5 posted 11-04-2019 02:51 PM

That is some gorgeous wood Brian.
I like how the sides of the lidded box is asymmetrical when you view it straight on but its symetrical when seen from an angle. Your interiors are fantastic. Does the organic looking one have tourquoise as inlay? or is that epoxy? Either way they are great. Both boxes are unique and the compartment on the top of the taller box is very cool.
Excellent. i like the dewclaws on the feet.
Jon

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

2394 posts in 2588 days


#6 posted 11-04-2019 03:00 PM

Very unique and very beautiful. Was the any hint of the olive wood smell. I use to love the smell of it when I turned it.

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

2131 posts in 432 days


#7 posted 11-04-2019 05:34 PM

Jon, its tinted epoxy. As funds allow, I will eventually start using torquoise.

And thank you!

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: The Big Bang: Nothing - exploded into Everything. Thanks to Nothing.

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

2131 posts in 432 days


#8 posted 11-04-2019 05:44 PM



Very unique and very beautiful. Was the any hint of the olive wood smell. I use to love the smell of it when I turned it.

- PaulDoug

Yes, the wood still retains the characteristic smell of olivewood, just somewhat “dryer” if ya know what I mean.
Its funny that you like the smell of green olive, as I absolutely hate it in general; and they use it here for firewood and that smell carried in the smoke really irritates me. Kind of like the smell of sandalwood incense or perfume laced with it, I get an instant headache from it.

The wood is stable, and since these were ceiling beams, they were only subject to normal humidity variations, not soakings from rain. But it is also very dry, which suggests to me great antiquity because olivewood has a remarkable ability to retain its moisture content for considerable time.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: The Big Bang: Nothing - exploded into Everything. Thanks to Nothing.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

4055 posts in 2107 days


#9 posted 11-04-2019 05:56 PM

A fine transition from the beam to the box. Those spikes remind me of the Russian olive I use, it is often covered with long thorns 8^@

The interiors are also cool though I’m partial to black (which would really contrast that inlay). Good call on not making them permanent 8^)

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

2131 posts in 432 days


#10 posted 11-04-2019 07:12 PM


The interiors are also cool though I m partial to black (which would really contrast that inlay). Good call on not making them permanent 8^)

- splintergroup

Thanks Splint. I think a certain shade of blue goes well with olive wood. And the colour of the liner really is much darker than in the photos, like hamilton blue darker. That being said, I typically design the interiors to be changeable according to the buyer´s fancy.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: The Big Bang: Nothing - exploded into Everything. Thanks to Nothing.

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

2394 posts in 2588 days


#11 posted 11-04-2019 07:14 PM


Very unique and very beautiful. Was the any hint of the olive wood smell. I use to love the smell of it when I turned it.

- PaulDoug

Yes, the wood still retains the characteristic smell of olivewood, just somewhat “dryer” if ya know what I mean.
Its funny that you like the smell of green olive, as I absolutely hate it in general; and they use it here for firewood and that smell carried in the smoke really irritates me. Kind of like the smell of sandalwood incense or perfume laced with it, I get an instant headache from it.

The wood is stable, and since these were ceiling beams, they were only subject to normal humidity variations, not soakings from rain. But it is also very dry, which suggests to me great antiquity because olivewood has a remarkable ability to retain its moisture content for considerable time.

- wildwoodbybrianjohns

Agreed for the green. Russian Olive grows like a weed where I live. When it is in “bloom” green trees they do the same for me, I hate them.

The olive wood I turned was from the middle east, it was dry and I liked the faint smell it gave off when turned/sanded.

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

4794 posts in 2507 days


#12 posted 11-04-2019 07:51 PM

Brian,
very beautiful grain, I see 2 bookmatched lids ? and your attention to detail is somewhat anal but in this case, that is GOOD !

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

2131 posts in 432 days


#13 posted 11-04-2019 08:17 PM


I see 2 bookmatched lids ?

- recycle1943

Correcto!

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: The Big Bang: Nothing - exploded into Everything. Thanks to Nothing.

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

2131 posts in 432 days


#14 posted 11-04-2019 08:24 PM


The olive wood I turned was from the middle east, it was dry and I liked the faint smell it gave off when turned/sanded.

- PaulDoug

For future reference, any time I mention olive wood, I am only speaking of the meditarranean variety, and I most commonly use the wood from wild trees, not the cultivated ones they harvest olives from.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: The Big Bang: Nothing - exploded into Everything. Thanks to Nothing.

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

923 posts in 2177 days


#15 posted 11-04-2019 09:15 PM

Very creative. I visited your website. It’s impressive. Your doing some great work there. Who hosts your page?
There must be a lot of olive trees in Spain.

-- James E McIntyre

showing 1 through 15 of 19 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com