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Building a circa 1911 pump cart to be powered by a 1911 hit n miss engine

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Project by DaleMaley posted 10-31-2019 11:10 AM 1771 views 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The first week of September 2019, I bought a 1911 Waterloo hit n miss engine. These engines were often used on farms to pump water before electricity was available to the farm. They are called hit n miss because they are speed controlled. If the engine is running too fast, it stops firing. If the speed is too low, it starts firing…....giving the distinctive hit n miss sound.

The engine had a faded green oil soaked wood frame, which was original from the factory in 1911. I had a sneaking suspicion there was some beautiful oak hiding under that ugly veneer. I “kissed” the wood cart pieces in the planer, and behold, there was gorgeous white oak underneath !!

I will exhibit this engine next summer, and will power a new water pump cart, so the set-up will run for a few hours pumping water.

I wanted the new water pump cart to match the 1911 design of the engine cart. I even found some new steel wheels on Ebay made for hit n miss engine carts. I used white oak to build a very sturdy cart for the pump jack, water pump, and 5-gallon bucket. I really like how the new cart turned out.

It has been a journey getting the old 108 year old engine running, and then pumping water using an 1890 pump jack from my dad’s farm. You can see my woodworking web site for the trials & tribulations I have had on this project, using this link.

I also made a short video showing how the hit n miss engine pumps water.

https://youtu.be/YnkZFFkMl1Q

thanks

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/





9 comments so far

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

593 posts in 3521 days


#1 posted 10-31-2019 11:38 AM

I made a short video showing the pump cart being pulled and turned.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7XVzNjp6lc

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

1181 posts in 4098 days


#2 posted 10-31-2019 11:14 PM

I have always wanted to restore one of these. Looks great,,

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

593 posts in 3521 days


#3 posted 10-31-2019 11:52 PM



I have always wanted to restore one of these. Looks great,,

- becikeja

If you want to restore a hit n miss engine, you should read my web pages on this project….....the link is in the main post.

I suspect the magneto is broke on most old hit n miss engines…..............and it can cost $200 to $500 to get them rebuilt There is a $20 work around where you replace the magneto with a 6 volt lantern battery plus a coil. This is explained on my web site.

thanks

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View lightweightladylefty's profile

lightweightladylefty

3665 posts in 4998 days


#4 posted 11-01-2019 03:37 AM

Dale,

Thanks so much for sharing this. We have often thought of such a project. Maybe this will inspire my husband to pursue it!

L/W

-- Voltaire: “Those Who Can Make You Believe Absurdities, Can Make You Commit Atrocities” There are 112 genders (not including male and female) https://dudeasks.com/how-many-genders-are-there-in-2021/

View PPK's profile

PPK

1872 posts in 2095 days


#5 posted 11-01-2019 03:47 PM

Super cool! I’ve always been fascinated by hit and miss engines. Great job on the restoration & cart

-- Pete

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

9136 posts in 1998 days


#6 posted 11-01-2019 04:04 PM

i love everything about this post GREAT JOB :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

View awsum55's profile

awsum55

1191 posts in 1794 days


#7 posted 11-01-2019 05:06 PM

That is something new to me. I’ve never even heard of a hit and miss engine. You did an incredible job on the design of the cart and the restoration of the motor. Thanks for sharing this, this project kicks azz. It appears to work as you hoped it would. Congrats on your DT3

-- John D, OP, KS

View DaleMaley's profile

DaleMaley

593 posts in 3521 days


#8 posted 11-01-2019 05:18 PM



That is something new to me. I ve never even heard of a hit and miss engine. You did an incredible job on the design of the cart and the restoration of the motor. Thanks for sharing this, this project kicks azz. It appears to work as you hoped it would. Congrats on your DT3

- awsum55

Thanks!

The Waterloo Gasoline Engine Company made 15,000 of these engines in 1911 alone!! The company was later bought out by John Deere, but Deere kept on making the exact same engine with no design changes. There are quite a few left, to the point that you can buy repair parts from at least 10 different suppliers.

-- Dale, Illinois, http://dalemaley.webs.com/

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1764 posts in 2921 days


#9 posted 11-01-2019 09:02 PM

Very cool Dale.
On Labor day we usually take our 5th wheel up to Shaver Lake, CA and every year they have several vintage machines like yours on display and running in front of the museum. A couple of years ago they had a very similar engine running a can crusher. The kids loved it! I really dig this old stuff. Thank you very much for sharing it with us.

-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.

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