LumberJocks

Viewing case for model car

  • Advertise with us
Project by Planeman40 posted 10-07-2019 08:40 PM 428 views 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is a case I made for a car model, a 1/8 scale 1909 Fiat race car. The case is made with a walnut base, Lexan plastic, and polished brass fittings plus some plush fabric and mirror Plexiglas for the top of the base beneath the car. I had to make the Lexan viewing cover twice as it was a tight fit. Lots of time put into both car and case, much more than one would expect.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!





14 comments so far

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

2220 posts in 2242 days


#1 posted 10-07-2019 08:59 PM

Awesome case,,, awesome car. I would not surprise me how much time both took….

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4111 posts in 1113 days


#2 posted 10-07-2019 09:06 PM

When something is absolutely correct, either the item on display, or the display it is housed in, it’s as good as it can be. It brings to mind the question, who made the car?

Both items are certainly worthy of a closer look.

Thanks for posting.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1453 posts in 3299 days


#3 posted 10-07-2019 09:13 PM

If the question is “Who made the car”, I made the car. – Planeman

And I guess I should say the car and case are sitting on a roll-around stool/low work table I made years ago and is not part of the model and case. One of handiest projects I ever made. I use it constantly.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1931 posts in 3552 days


#4 posted 10-07-2019 09:29 PM

Nice job.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

View htl's profile

htl

4845 posts in 1698 days


#5 posted 10-07-2019 10:37 PM

Super nice work all the way around the project!!!

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs https://www.lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/130264

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

3014 posts in 1359 days


#6 posted 10-08-2019 02:01 AM

Love that case planeman.

Further to the ”Who made the car”, ”What is it made of”? Is it a plastic kit?

Back to the case. Incredible how many modelers neglect to cover up their creations, only to have it thrown out (or relegated to a dark area) after years of accumulated dust results in broken parts due to an over zealous cleanliness freak missus’s duster (said without malice).

Couple of questions:
  • Glalss or acrylic/perspex sides?
  • Glued or siliconed? What used.
  • More detail on the brass fittings, please.

I am interested as I am currently building a perspex display case for my 55+ year old heirloom... will be posting soon.
Some of the questions are based on my use of CA and perspex and many messes made by spilled CA on the perspex faces (not just the edges). Have found a fix and will be blogging as a future tip.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Ivan's profile

Ivan

15197 posts in 3406 days


#7 posted 10-08-2019 04:34 AM

Nice case – nice car too!

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

6152 posts in 2805 days


#8 posted 10-08-2019 04:03 PM

AWESOME

+

AWESOME

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1453 posts in 3299 days


#9 posted 10-08-2019 04:37 PM

To answer the question above . . .

“Couple of questions:

Glalss or acrylic/perspex sides?
Glued or siliconed? What used.
More detail on the brass fittings, please.

The material I used for the case is Lexan, a relatively non-breakable clear plastic akin to Plexiglas (Perspex for you Brits) that is used as replacement for window glass. Lexan, like Plexiglas, can be worked with sharp woodworking tools and is usually cut on a table saw. The thickness I used was 1/16” for a reason, but 1/8” is the usual thickness for these cases. There is a special glue used for Lexan and Plexiglas. You can buy it from the plastic sellers and even big box stores like Home Depot in the window glass section. It is applied using a small squeeze bottle with a hypodermic syringe type needle on the bottle. You will have to make a 90 degree wooden jig to hold the plastic in place while gluing. The glue is applied by VERY carefully dragging the needle tip down the inside of the plastic joint. If you “mess up”, it shows and you can’t remove it. Bonding is very slow to take place. Allow six hours before CAREFULLY removing the glued pieces from the jig. Allow it to sit until well into the following day for the glued joint to reach maximum strength. Do ONE JOINT at a time! Also, be sure to make all glued edges very smooth, not polished, but smooth. Ragged edges will show.

Glass can be used, but is prone to easy breakage. Generally, plastic is best.

The brass fittings were bought off-the-shelf. The round threaded brass knobs are lamp finials (the brass knobs that hold the shade on the top of the lamp). Lamp sellers and some hardware stores sell these. You can also buy them on the Internet. The brass corners were found on the internet. The 1/8” brass rods are from some 1/8” brass brazing rods I had with my welding supplies. A welding supplier can sell you a few. I just used a die to put some threads on the ends.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

3014 posts in 1359 days


#10 posted 10-08-2019 09:38 PM

Than


To answer the question above . . .
.....
- Planeman40

Thanks for the thorough answer Plaeman’.

Didn’t think it was glass, however, had to ask. Wasn’t aware that there was a special glue… that’s why I use CA, which does work, but makes one helluva mess if you even slightly deviate… and even more if your applier does a premature ejaculation over the face (as opposed to the edges).

Have found a way to clean up the spills… blog forthcoming.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1453 posts in 3299 days


#11 posted 10-08-2019 09:46 PM

_”Have found a way to clean up the spills… blog forthcoming.”

Now This I want to hear!!!

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

3014 posts in 1359 days


#12 posted 10-09-2019 11:55 AM



Now This I want to hear!!!
- Planeman40

As promised!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6478 posts in 2743 days


#13 posted 10-11-2019 09:04 AM

I was a bit of a perspex bin diver bandit when I was younger made quite a few items and use some special glue.
I think I still have it if your interested in knowing what it is
BTW you dont glue prespex edges just run it along the seam and it wicks in!

-- Regards Rob

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6478 posts in 2743 days


#14 posted 10-11-2019 09:59 AM

I was a bit of a perspex bin diver bandit when I was younger made quite a few items and use some special glue.
I think I still have it if your interested in knowing what it is
BTW you dont glue prespex edges just run it along the seam and it wicks in!

-- Regards Rob

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com