LumberJocks

Ready for a Beer II -- Ringmaster Edition

  • Advertise with us
Project by Lazyman posted 08-23-2019 08:07 PM 717 views 1 time favorited 23 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This was my woodworking item for the 2019 Beer Swap. I made them for LJ Steve . I decided to use my Ringmaster to make a can koozie and made a simple prototype using Douglas Fir that I re-sawed from a 4×4 with a bradford pear rim (4th and 5th picture, right koozie). The quarter sawn vertical grain resulted in a really cool pattern on the side. The rings were cut about 1/4” thick, glued on and turned and sanded on the lathe so that the walls are about 1/8” thick. The prototype turned out to be a little rough due to tearout of the DF endgrain so I made a second one to send to Steve from silver maple with a walnut rim. It had a somewant punky heartwood that I managed to orient to form nice pattern.

I personally like my beer poured into a glass so I ordered some can shaped glasses that were supposedly the same diameter as a standard can but proved to be about 3/8” larger in diameter. I decided to make a larger koozie just for the glass. Again I started with a Doug fir prototype but the koozie exploded as I was shaping the second to last ring. I then used some wedges I had left over from the vase I made last year to make a second one and managed to complete it without totally screwing it up. This was made by gluing walnut and maple wedges together, cutting it into squares and cutting rings on the Ringmaster. Here is a picture before glue up.

BTW, I was able to find all of the pieces of the doug fir glass koozie and glue it back together to make a glass koozie for myself. It had less chipout than the first prototype but you can definitely see the glue lines where I put the piece back together so I decided the maple and walnut one was a better one to send.

You can see the beer that I sent Steve along with the 2 koozies I sent here. His pictures are are probably better than mine so you can check those out too.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.





23 comments so far

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12887 posts in 2859 days


#1 posted 08-23-2019 08:19 PM

Nice work Nathan.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View HokieKen's profile (online now)

HokieKen

10743 posts in 1617 days


#2 posted 08-23-2019 08:31 PM

Very good stuff Nathan! I really love the branch marks in the koozie. I also like how the glass fits in the other one. I’ve been wondering how I could make a nice wood beer mug but still have at least some ability to see my beers. This prompts my little brain to ticking :-))

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3873 posts in 1866 days


#3 posted 08-23-2019 08:43 PM

Unfortunately Kenny,even though I intentionally made it a little shorter than the can koozie so you can see more of the beer in the glass, with the wider dimension of the glass, a 12 oz beer will just barely show the head above the rim of the wood in the walnut and maple one, though obviously you can see and smell the beer as you drink it. The DF prototype is a little shorter so I think that it will show the beer better. I remember you saying how beer in stainless steel tastes funny to you so when I stumbled upon these I had to get them for a koozie.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View HokieKen's profile (online now)

HokieKen

10743 posts in 1617 days


#4 posted 08-23-2019 08:47 PM

I was actually thinking about turning a sleeve that went almost to the top of the glass then maybe using a router fixture of some sort on the lathe and indexing it and routing windows in the center section. If that makes sense…

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3873 posts in 1866 days


#5 posted 08-23-2019 08:55 PM

That’s a good idea Kenny. You could make a router fluting jig for the lathe to cut some slots every 60 degrees or so.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View RichBolduc's profile

RichBolduc

1080 posts in 595 days


#6 posted 08-23-2019 08:59 PM

Nice one! I did koozies last year. There’s a koozie kit I found on crafts supply USA I think if you ever want to make more.

Rich

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3873 posts in 1866 days


#7 posted 08-23-2019 09:07 PM

I actually bought a kit on a clearance table for 75 cents at Woodcraft a couple of months ago. It was basically a foam liner and a plastic ring for the rim. I couldn’t figure out why you would put s plastic rim on it, though I did include the foam liner.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

4029 posts in 2456 days


#8 posted 08-23-2019 09:13 PM

Nathan, that is some awesome turning. I really like the style of these. Super job.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

4114 posts in 1061 days


#9 posted 08-23-2019 09:46 PM

Very nice work, Nathan!

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

1345 posts in 1589 days


#10 posted 08-23-2019 09:53 PM

Very nice craftsmanship in that project.
Something beautiful and original from nothing more than otherwise re sawn scrap.
Very nice work, What did you finish them with Nathan?
They certainly popped great.
Regards
Anth

-- To be a true artist one must stick to their own thought process

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3873 posts in 1866 days


#11 posted 08-23-2019 10:05 PM

Thanks Anth. The silver maple and the douglas fir glass koozie were simply finished with a spray on oil based polyurethane, inside and out. The maple/walnut wedge and the doug fir can koozies were finished on the outside with CA but I just used the spray on poly on the inside. I didn’t get the inside smooth enough for the CA to work well in there, plus it is just too hard to apply inside.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3873 posts in 1866 days


#12 posted 08-24-2019 01:51 AM

Thanks everyone!

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

3030 posts in 2827 days


#13 posted 08-24-2019 02:40 AM

Nathan – great project – as always. They have a hint of a rustic look but they are definitely upscale.

When I read that you used a ringmaster I thought of some of the translucent segmented bowls Dick makes (Recycle1943). Maybe you can incorporate some acrylic panels in one of your coozies?

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3873 posts in 1866 days


#14 posted 08-24-2019 04:32 AM

Thanks Earl. I was thinking the same thing after Kenny mentioned cutting slots so you can see the beer. I’ve been following Dick and his translucent bowls for a while now too.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View MJR's profile

MJR

233 posts in 893 days


#15 posted 08-24-2019 03:25 PM

Very nice! I’m going to make some Ringmaster mugs and vases soon, I actually taught Dick the finer points of epoxy resin and he taught me his method of making bowls with a ringmaster lathe that he actually sold me, LOL He had an “extra” one that he got at a county fair by trading a guy that bought one but wasn’t interested in using it anymore. You can see my bowls and bowls with epoxy and lampshades with epoxy in my projects.

showing 1 through 15 of 23 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com