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Cherry & oak floating top coffee table

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Project by Antti posted 08-09-2019 06:03 AM 597 views 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Slow but steady, the coffee table is finished. The idea was to get it ready for christmas, and as that deadline passed so did the inspiration, for a while. It took some revving of the engine to get going with the shaping of the top as well as identifying & correcting the cause for slight rocking of the bottom. Now with some days of ”own time” in the end of summer vacation, I managed to complete the project!

The joints are bomb-proof, with two slats reinforcing the (weak) miters. The top is screwed on, with room for wood expansion in the holes for the respective dimension.





6 comments so far

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

1376 posts in 1594 days


#1 posted 08-09-2019 08:34 AM

Very very nice, i would be interested to hear your technique for how you made the top.
Nice work

-- To be a true artist one must stick to their own thought process

View Antti's profile

Antti

79 posts in 3094 days


#2 posted 08-09-2019 09:39 AM

Thank you.
Re your question about the top: I jointed and planed four boards, then glued them together. Then I planed that ”wider board” smooth and to some random thickness around 25 mm (1 inch). I then screwed piece of plywood to the middle of that board with a single screw (which became the middle of the circle). The plywood had another, larger hole for seating a plunge router’s collet(?) so that the edge of the bit would fall to the correct distance from that middle point. I routed only a shallow groove first by rotating the plywood holding the router. Then I band sawed along that groove, flipped the piece the other way, and finally routed the edge fully smooth against the shallow groove with a bearing bit (on a router table).

Then I marked a smaller circle on the bottom side, maybe inch and a half from the edge with a felt tip marker, and draw a line also on the edge to mark my desired thickness. Then it was a lot of sweat with block plane and a rasp towards those lines. When I was relatively close, I made a jig (of sorts): A piece of plywood with the (a section of) the same radius as my table top. I glued small stops to the plywood, so that the table top would stay in a fixed position relative to that plywood base. I tried to aim the position so that when my sanding block would rest on the edge of the (larger) plywood base, the sandpaper would be in a good angle relative to the shape I was after. All this was just eyeballed, and I’m sure the shape is not absolutely true or identical on every side. My plywood base was also changing shape due to the sandpaper hitting it every now and then. No matter, as long as the part you see – the edge – from above is somewhat level!

View Ivan's profile

Ivan

14957 posts in 3351 days


#3 posted 08-09-2019 09:48 AM

Beautiful joinery and floating effect.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

1376 posts in 1594 days


#4 posted 08-09-2019 10:01 AM


Thank you.
Re your question about the top: I jointed and planed four boards, then glued them together. Then I planed that ”wider board” smooth and to some random thickness around 25 mm (1 inch). I then screwed piece of plywood to the middle of that board with a single screw (which became the middle of the circle). The plywood had another, larger hole for seating a plunge router’s collet(?) so that the edge of the bit would fall to the correct distance from that middle point. I routed only a shallow groove first by rotating the plywood holding the router. Then I band sawed along that groove, flipped the piece the other way, and finally routed the edge fully smooth against the shallow groove with a bearing bit (on a router table).

Then I marked a smaller circle on the bottom side, maybe inch and a half from the edge with a felt tip marker, and draw a line also on the edge to mark my desired thickness. Then it was a lot of sweat with block plane and a rasp towards those lines. When I was relatively close, I made a jig (of sorts): A piece of plywood with the (a section of) the same radius as my table top. I glued small stops to the plywood, so that the table top would stay in a fixed position relative to that plywood base. I tried to aim the position so that when my sanding block would rest on the edge of the (larger) plywood base, the sandpaper would be in a good angle relative to the shape I was after. All this was just eyeballed, and I’m sure the shape is not absolutely true or identical on every side. My plywood base was also changing shape due to the sandpaper hitting it every now and then. No matter, as long as the part you see – the edge – from above is somewhat level!

- Antti

That’s very very nice work. Hand crafted.
Very nice

Regards Anth

-- To be a true artist one must stick to their own thought process

View swirt's profile

swirt

4160 posts in 3456 days


#5 posted 08-09-2019 03:01 PM

Very nice results! well done.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7498 posts in 3852 days


#6 posted 08-10-2019 05:24 AM

An elegant design and well excuted!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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