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End vise anti-racking jig

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Project by Oldtool posted 07-30-2019 10:51 PM 2416 views 3 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’m posting this as an easy possible solution for those that use their end vise to either clamp a component on one side, or as I do – clamp along the from edge of the bench for sticking molding or planing long narrow boards. Hopefully this will benefit some others, especially if there is no wagon vise.

Picture two shows all the needed materials I used: a 1/4” poplar dowel, a 3/4” oak dowel, a small block of cherry to be used for center drilling the oak dowel, and a block of hard maple to extend my vise jaw.

Picture 3 shows a dowel drilling block as described somewhere on the web, can’t remember where I saw it, but basically: I drilled a 3/4” hole through the block for the larger dowel, and a 1/4” hole – centered on the first & on the top, to guide the drill bit to the center of the larger dowel.

Number 4 picture shows the drilled dowel & centering block.

Picture 5 shows the drilling spacing on the dowel. I used 1/4” holes with 1/4” between the circumferences or edges of the holes – which equals 1/2” center to center. Then I drilled another series of holes directly in between the first set, at 90 degrees from the first. This yields 1/4” increments for rack adjustments. So far I have found this to be sufficient to my needs, with some experimentation yielding a maximum vice rack or distortion at about 1/8”.
If this is too course for others, I believe that the oak dowel can be drilled three ways or directions, by rotating 60 degrees each time, to yield much closer spacing. I’ve not attempted this though.

Picture 6 shows how the dowel will resist against the added maple block, in my case. This was only done because I have no space to drill a 3/4” hole directly behind the jaw due to the factory screws between each of the stabilizers and the adjustment screw, as shown in this under bench photo:

As for the oak dowel, I made it long enough to reach as far as possible when in & flush with vise face, with drilling enough quarter inch holes to permit use with the vise open as far as it goes. Opening or extracting the dowel when in flush is very easy by reaching under the bench, it is very loose in the hole, but stable due to the length – it doesn’t fall out.

Also, needing some lathe time, I decided to make a pin to replace the dowel, with a cap copied from a brass adjustment screw from my antique plow plane.

Time has shown this set up to work very well, and the pin allows a great deal of vise pressure to be applied, with the pin exposed top & bottom of the dowel. The shearing force to break it is much greater than any I’ve applied. I have clamped a 3/8” board at about 24” long on the front of the bench between the vise dog & a bench dog to the point where it bowed up.

Hopefully this will benefit someone else, and should there be any questions, please contact me.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln





11 comments so far

View oldrivers's profile

oldrivers

2725 posts in 2806 days


#1 posted 07-30-2019 11:16 PM

Thanks!

-- Soli Deo gloria!

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

8414 posts in 1822 days


#2 posted 07-31-2019 12:10 AM

Nice simple solution!

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

5845 posts in 2862 days


#3 posted 07-31-2019 12:41 PM

I can see how that would help

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - my biggest fear is that when I die, my wife sells my toys for what I told her I paid for them

View RCCinNC's profile

RCCinNC

513 posts in 1566 days


#4 posted 07-31-2019 01:12 PM

Much more elegant solution than the usual “find a piece of wood to use as a spacer about the same thickness and hold it in place on the other side of the vise face all the while trying to clamp your workpiece in an appropriate position without dropping it or the wood spacer or both” technique.

Thanks for the detail! like it!

-- Live to putter...putter to live!

View swirt's profile

swirt

6624 posts in 4212 days


#5 posted 07-31-2019 01:19 PM

Very clever.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View SMP's profile

SMP

4816 posts in 1145 days


#6 posted 07-31-2019 02:15 PM



Much more elegant solution than the usual “find a piece of wood to use as a spacer about the same thickness and hold it in place on the other side of the vise face all the while trying to clamp your workpiece in an appropriate position without dropping it or the wood spacer or both” technique.

Thanks for the detail! like it!

- RCCinNC

Haha, I was literally doing that the other day, wasn’t until it fell about 10-12 times that I stuck a dab of glue on and clamped an offcut to keep it from falling and went to grab lunch whil the glue dried.

View awsum55's profile

awsum55

1132 posts in 1748 days


#7 posted 07-31-2019 09:21 PM

Thanks, that is much easier than what I’ve been doing. I thought I just had a crappy vise, I didn’t know this was a common problem.

-- John D, OP, KS

View  woodshaver Tony C   's profile

woodshaver Tony C

8277 posts in 4593 days


#8 posted 08-01-2019 12:13 PM

Great idea! Thanks! I was just using my vice and thinking about the racking.

-- St Augustine FL, Experience is the sum of our mistakes!

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

1761 posts in 2876 days


#9 posted 08-01-2019 09:53 PM

Very clever. I use scraps and what ever I can find. I may need to do something like that myself.

-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.

View JCinVA's profile

JCinVA

245 posts in 2070 days


#10 posted 08-03-2019 02:39 AM

What an ingenious idea and well documented project. The turned pin is a nice touch too!

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